The Wheelhouse Digest
11:37 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Foreshaw Asks for Clemency; Explosives in Fairfield; Debt Crisis

The federal shutdown has been tough on a lot of people, as was made eminently clear this morning during the Wheelhouse episode of Where We Live, when plenty of impassioned callers made their frustrated views known. Making matters a little tougher, the U.S. Treasury Department is running out of cash to pay its bills. More on that below in The Wheelhouse Digest, plus a link to watch the Bonnie Foreshaw clemency hearing live from Niantic.

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Tamara Miller, daughter of victim Joyce Amos, testifying at today's clemency hearing for Bonnie Foreshaw.
Tamara Miller, daughter of victim Joyce Amos, testifying at today's clemency hearing for Bonnie Foreshaw.
Credit CT-N

FORESHAW'S CLEMENCY HEARING
Having served more than 27 years, Bonnie Foreshaw appears before a state panel.

Likely the longest-serving female inmate in the state, Bonnie Foreshaw is before a state panel this morning asking for clemency after serving over 27 years in prison for killing a pregnant woman in the 1980s. Superior Court Judge Jon Blue has already testified to explain why he thinks her legal representation at the time was ineffective. Also testifying today was victim Joyce Amos's daughter, Tamara Miller.

Watch more here at WNPR.org.

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Ammonium nitrate, among the chemicals allegedly found at a home in Fairfield on Tuesday.
Ammonium nitrate, among the chemicals allegedly found at a home in Fairfield on Tuesday.
Credit Teravolt / Wikimedia Commons

CHEMICALS FOUND IN FAIRFIELD HOME
About 100 pounds of explosives were found in vats in a garage.

Telling police he was working on a bomb for rock star Keith Richards, Joseph Callahan of Fairfield was arrested Tuesday and charged with illegal possession of explosives, first-degree reckless endangerment, and the manufacture of bombs.

Read more at The Stamford Advocate.

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Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

DEBT CRISIS EXPLAINED
Just why would a debt default be so dire?

U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew said the Treasury Department will begin to fall short of cash to pay its bills by October 17. On NBC's "Meet the Press," Lew said, "A failure of Congress to act would for the first time put us in a place where we're defaulting on our obligations as a government." Treasury debt is key to the global economy. What are the options? Jim Zarroli explains.

Listen more here at WNPR.org.