WNPR

Washington

Confusion Reigns As GOP Scrambles To Avert A Government Shutdown

Updated at 12:20 PM President Trump injected fresh confusion into tense negotiations to avert an impending government shutdown with a morning tweet that indicated he opposed the House stop-gap funding bill. "CHIP should be part of a long term solution, not a 30 Day, or short term, extension!" Trump tweeted Thursday morning. The House funding bill includes a six-year renewal of the popular Children's Health Insurance Program, which GOP leaders included as a potential sweetener to get the votes...

Read More
jeroen_bennink / Creative Commons

Connecticut and several other states are asking a federal appeals court to overturn a recent vote by the Federal Communications Commission. The FCC rolled back net neutrality regulations -- potentially paving the way for internet service providers to selectively favor online content.

Connecticut's Supreme Court has rejected a claim that the state's educational funding formula is unconstitutional. 

Updated at 12:20 PM

President Trump injected fresh confusion into tense negotiations to avert an impending government shutdown with a morning tweet that indicated he opposed the House stop-gap funding bill.

"CHIP should be part of a long term solution, not a 30 Day, or short term, extension!" Trump tweeted Thursday morning. The House funding bill includes a six-year renewal of the popular Children's Health Insurance Program, which GOP leaders included as a potential sweetener to get the votes they need to pass the stop-gap measure.

In the competition for Amazon's second headquarters, just 20 metropolitan areas remain in the running.

Last year, Amazon set off a hyper-competitive proposal process, saying that it plans to invest $5 billion in building a second headquarters that could create up to 50,000 high-paying jobs.

The Seattle-based company, which is a financial supporter of NPR, says it reviewed 238 proposals in the U.S., Mexico and Canada. Here are the metropolitan areas that made the cut:

2017 was among the warmest years on record, according to new data released by NASA and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration.

The planet's global surface temperature last year was second warmest since 1880, NASA says. NOAA calls it the third warmest year on record, due to slight variation in the ways that they analyze temperatures.

Both put 2017 behind 2016's record temperatures. And "both analyses show that the five warmest years on record have all taken place since 2010," NASA said in a press release.

As President Trump approaches his first anniversary of taking office, he and others are taking stock.

"2017 was a year of tremendous achievement, monumental achievement, actually," Trump told members of his Cabinet last week. "I don't think any administration has ever done what we've done and what we've accomplished in its first year."

The president has delivered on some of his major campaign promises. Other pledges are still works in progress, while some commitments have been quietly discarded.

JR P (Flickr) / Creative Commons

With an already long feeling winter -- and it's still January -- it's a good time to plan your flower gardens. One design that everyone loves is the English cottage garden.

Marchers head down Main Street in Middletown during an annual celebration Monday honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
VANESSA DE LA TORRE / WNPR

Evan Davis was still on the school bus Friday morning, rolling up to Middletown High School at 7:00 am, when he saw a fellow student in the campus parking lot holding a Confederate flag.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal speaking to reporters in Hartford on November 13, 2017.
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal is prepared to vote against a short-term funding bill that would prevent a government shutdown at the end of the week.

woodleywonderworks/flickr creative commons

A lot more attention has been paid in recent years to addressing the needs of kids with severe developmental delays and diagnoses like autism. But a new study finds that we're not offering the best help to kids who may have more moderate needs.

Pages

Get The News

Trouble Keeping Up With News?

Get the WNPR email newsletter daily.

Special Coverage

WNPR's Coverage of a Drug Crisis

The nation is in the midst of a opioid crisis, and so is Connecticut.

Live Event

A Conversation About The Opioid Epidemic

Join WNPR's Where We Live for a documentary screening and panel discussion.

New Programs For 2018

Feast Your Ears!

WNPR presents new weekend programs for lovers of food, music and culture.

Special Coverage

Puerto Rico and Connecticut After Hurricane Maria

Follow @WNPR on Twitter

The Beaker

Gone Forever, But Still Sought

For millennia the great auk was revered, then humans killed them all.

WNPR Shows

Call in to talk about where we live and who we are. Our show highlights Connecticut's diverse communities -- and we want to hear your stories.
We feature topics that vary widely from day to day. You'll hear a thoughtful, smart, interesting conversation with amazing guests.
Connecticut's best journalists come out of the political trenches every Wednesday for our weekly news roundtable.
Get ideas for easy cooking and healthful living every week.
Our weekly show is about all of New England, America's oldest place, at a time of change.