Adnan Syed, Subject Of 'Serial,' Asks To Be Released On Bail

Adnan Syed, whose murder conviction was exhaustively explored in the first season of the hit podcast Serial, has asked a judge to release him on bail.His lawyers said they filed the request in a Maryland court on Monday.Syed is currently waiting to go to trial — again. This summer, a judge agreed that Syed's defense attorney had mishandled his case during his murder trial in 2000, and granted a new trial."Syed has now served more than 17 years in prison based on an unconstitutional conviction...
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Business Briefs

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Cigna Simplifies Opioid Addiction Treatment

Bloomfield-based health insurer Cigna has agreed to end a policy that required physicians to fill out extra paperwork before they could give patients a drug used to treat opioid addiction.
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What have you always wondered about? WNPR is taking your questions.
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Presidential Campaigns Blast AT&T-Time Warner Merger

AT&T's proposed $85.4 billion purchase of Time Warner is already raising eyebrows among an important constituency: politicians. Reaction to the deal, which was announced Saturday night, has been swift, and skeptical, from both sides of the aisle.At a rally in Gettysburg, Pa., earlier Saturday, after news of the deal had started to trickle out, GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump said it was "a deal we will not approve in my administration because it's too much concentration of power in...
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Jill Kaufman / New England Public Radio

Thirty-seven states now provide some kind of opportunity for all registered voters to cast their ballots before Election Day. Massachusetts is the newest kid on the block with in-person "early voting" that started on Monday, October 24.

Rhoda Baer/National Cancer Institute / Creative Commons

A growing number of adolescents in Connecticut and nationwide are protecting themselves from human papillovirus (HPV), new data show, but disparities persist in who is getting vaccinated.

Refugees from around the world continue to find homes in Massachusetts.

The number of Syrian refugees, in particular, has more than doubled here over the last year, despite heated national rhetoric around immigration.

Increased Interest Greets New Refugees

In the basement of the First United Baptist Church in Lowell, newly arrived refugees from Syria and Afghanistan stand shoulder to shoulder with new arrivals from Somalia.

For Ross Roberts, it was a lack of resources that drove him from the classroom. For Danielle Painton, it was too much emphasis on testing. For Sergio Gonzalez, it was a nasty political environment.

Welcome to the U.S. teaching force, where the "I'm outta here" rate is an estimated 8 percent a year — twice that of high-performing countries like Finland or Singapore. And that 8 percent is a lot higher than other professions.

From the outset, Democrats needed a very big-wave election to get to the 30 seats they need to win back control of the House. Then, a video of Donald Trump surfaced showing the GOP nominee making lewd comments, and later multiple women accused him of groping them. That left some wondering if these scandals could trigger that wave.

But that simply hasn't happened.

Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act prohibits employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of several things, among them race. The law, however, doesn't define "race."

It also doesn't say anything about hair.

Which brings us to Chastity Jones.

Ray Hardman / WNPR

When the famous Austrian pianist Paul Wittgenstein lost his right arm in World War I, composers lined up to write works for the pianist featuring the left hand only. One of those works, Maurice Ravel's "Piano Concerto for the Left Hand," will be performed this Sunday by the West Hartford Symphony Orchestra. The soloist for that performance lost the use of his right hand in an unthinkable family tragedy.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

A Canadian startup, Dream Payments, will be relocating to grow its business in Connecticut, after winning the state’s first ever international pitch competition. 

Long Wharf Theater

Long Wharf Theater in New Haven is participating in a unique national collaboration that looks at the issue of police brutality and the Black Lives Matter Movement.

neetalparekh via flickr.com / Creative Commons

Connecticut business leaders are sounding the alarm about the state’s economic direction after the third straight month of job losses.


2016 Election

Campaign Coverage: 2016 Election

Election Day is almost here. Catch up on the latest in campaign coverage from NPR and WNPR reporters.


Visitors Get Glimpse Of Block Island Wind Farm In Test Phase

The nation’s first offshore wind farm off the coast of Block Island is in the middle of its testing phase. It’ll start producing electricity next month. Delegates from various federal Sea Grant programs around the country got a boat tour of the turbines to learn how the Ocean State got this project done.
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Harriet Jones / WNPR

Trade Mission Brings Together Tibet and Connecticut

Running a small business will always be a challenging way of life. But if your home country is occupied by a foreign power and you are part of a diaspora of refugees spread across the world, your challenges rise to a new level.
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More News: Creative Science

Out Of This World: How Artists Imagine Planets Yet Unseen

When scientists recently announced that they had discovered a new planet orbiting our closest stellar neighbor, Proxima Centuri, they also released an artist's conception of the planet.The picture of a craggy canyon, illuminated by a reddish-orange sunset, looked like an image that could have been taken on Mars by one of NASA's rovers. But the alien scene was actually completely made-up.It's part of an ever-increasing gallery of images depicting real planets beyond our solar system that, in...
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The Beaker

This "Ghost" Hates The Color Green

It's a rare example of a flowering plant that doesn't have any green chlorophyll.

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Special Coverage

WNPR's Coverage of a Drug Crisis

The nation is in the midst of a opioid crisis, and so is Connecticut. We're focusing this week on special reporting.

More News: Protests

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Photos: a Visit to the Standing Rock Pipeline Protest Camp in North Dakota

Since April, protesters against an oil pipeline have been camping in tents, tipis, and trailers at a site just across the Missouri River from the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota. For a few days, I stayed at the camp, and met people who gathered there to support the effort.
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More News: Sports

West Point - The U.S. Military Academy

Big 12 Dashes UConn's Hopes of "Power Five" Conference Membership

UConn will not be moving to the Big 12 after all. After months of speculation, the athletic conference decided Monday to nix plans for expansion, dashing the hopes of UConn and 10 other schools who were under consideration to join.
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More News: Environment

Lori Mack / WNPR

Clean Water Advocate Stops in New Haven During Swim Across Long Island Sound

Clean water advocate Christopher Swain stopped in New Haven during a 130-mile swim from Montauk to New York City.
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Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Some Taxes, Some Restructuring: Hartford Mayor Pitches Ideas to Help Municipalities

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin is continuing his effort to highlight the capital city's structural financial problems. And he's giving state lawmakers a few suggestions on how to fix them.
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