Science

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

New Haven-Based Scientist Looks Forward to Watching Decades of Work Fly in Space

A local astronomer will be watching closely Friday morning as decades of his work flies into space aboard a Japanese rocket.
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Jazz Corridor

William P Gottlieb / Wikipedia

Donn Trenner’s Memoir Celebrates His Seven Colorful Decades in Music

An immodestly gifted musician yet extremely modest gentleman of the old school, the noted pianist, conductor and arranger Donn Trenner, an 88-year-old New Haven native, has performed with such jazz giants as Charlie Parker, Stan Getz, Chet Baker, Gerry Mulligan, Oscar Pettiford, and Ben Webster.
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Further unraveling a project that's been a sign of cooperation, North Korea is ordering all South Koreans from a jointly run industrial complex, after South Korea announced it would suspend work there in retaliation for Pyongyang's recent missile launch and nuclear test.

North Korea is also freezing all assets related to the Kaesong Industrial Complex and cutting two communications hotlines between the neighboring countries.

From Seoul, reporter Haeryun Kang tells our Newscast unit:

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has suspended his campaign for president.

"And while running for president I tried to reinforce what I have always believed — that speaking your mind matters, that experience matters, that competence matters and that it will always matter in leading our nation," said Christie in a post on Facebook.

The decision comes after a sixth-place finish in New Hampshire, where Christie had banked so much of his political capital.

Carly Fiorina is exiting the Republican presidential race after a seventh-place showing in last night's New Hampshire primary.

"While I suspend my candidacy today, I will continue to travel this country and fight for those Americans who refuse to settle for the way things are and a status quo that no longer works for them," said Fiorina in a statement.

It was a rumor that had many Twitter old-timers up in arms: Twitter is changing its signature structure of real-time posts in reverse chronological order.

It's true. The company now says it's got a new algorithm to predict which tweets you might not want to miss. Those selected tweets, minutes or hours old, will display at the top when you log in after an absence. The rest of the tweets below will remain in real-time and reverse chronology.

CT Senate Democrats

A report by the Connecticut Women's Education and Legal Fund shows victims are staying longer at the state's domestic violence shelters, creating a strain on shelters' resources and available space.

A New York congressman has called on Amazon to ban the sale of gun-shaped phone cases. Though officials say the online giant already has such a ban in place, one of its third-party retailers was able to slip through the cracks.

Democratic Congressman Eliot Engel last week called for the retail giant to stop the sale of cell phone cases that are made to look like guns. Although Amazon itself does not sell them, Engel found that a third-party retailer was able to list this type of case on Amazon’s online marketplace.

c-George/iStock / Thinkstock

About half of Connecticut businesses oppose the idea of the state getting further into the retirement business. That’s the finding of a survey commissioned by the Connecticut Retirement Security Board. 

Wikimedia Commons

Could King Henry VIII have suffered from the same brain injuries affecting some modern-day football players? That's the question at the center of a new study looking at traumatic brain injury. 

Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders won clear, early and decisive victories in the New Hampshire primary Tuesday night.

Trump beat the GOP field by double digits. He got 35 percent of the vote, well ahead of surprise second-place finisher John Kasich, who pulled in 16 percent. Kasich was followed by Ted Cruz at 12 percent, Jeb Bush at 11 percent and Marco Rubio, who, after a poor debate performance Saturday, faded to fifth just shy of 11 percent.

Hartford Yard Goats / Facebook

When the city of Hartford needed land for its $350 million stadium and downtown development project, it couldn’t come to an agreement with a certain property owner on a price. So the city took some of the land it wanted by force, and decided to pay $1.9 million for it -- an amount its owner said was "wholly inadequate."

Now, the matter is in court, and the two sides are in front of a judge arguing over how much the city should actually pay. 

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More News: Health Care

Connor Tarter / Creative Commons

Connecticut Touts New Insurance Enrollments Under Obamacare

More than 116,000 people signed up for private insurance through Obamacare in the program's third year of open enrollment.
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The Radius Project

Mapping Hartford in a New Way

Hear lively stories about Hartford that just might surprise you.

The Beaker

The Colorful Magic Of Sea Slugs

This splashy group of gastropods can be found in oceans worldwide.

More News: Disease

Lori Mack / WNPR

Connecticut Officials Are Sued Over Ebola Quarantines in 2014

Several people quarantined in Connecticut after returning from West Africa during the Ebola epidemic in 2014 have filed a class-action lawsuit against state health officials, saying they were essentially imprisoned based on politics and not any legal or scientific reason.
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Zoned

"The Driving Boom Is Over"

It’s a little bit of a head-scratcher that Gov. Malloy wants to widen major highways in the state.

On Course

Is There a Way to Combine Logic and Creativity in the Classroom?

Thinking logically and creatively at the same time is the best way to solve complex problems. Why not teach both to students?

More from WNPR

Pete Jelliffe / Creative Commons

Upstate New York Town Looks to Microgrid to Avoid Outages

A town in upstate New York is planning to pull its municipal buildings completely off the grid to prevent future power outages.
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