WNPR

Washington

Rick Gates Pleads Guilty And Begins Cooperating With Mueller's Russia Investigation

Updated at 5:28 p.m. ET Rick Gates, the business partner of Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, pleaded guilty on Friday to two charges and will begin cooperating with federal prosecutors investigating the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Gates appeared in federal court on Friday afternoon. He told Judge Amy Berman Jackson he was making the plea of his own free will. Under U.S. sentencing guidelines, Gates could get between four and...

Read More
Fran Rabinowitz, the president of the Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents, called for changes to gun legislation Thursday at East Hartford High School. She was supported by student leadership at the school.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

East Hartford High School students are joining a national chorus of voices against gun violence. They want to be heard by legislators in Washington D.C.

Lori Mack/WNPR

The Federal Communications Commission has ordered Obama-era net neutrality rules to end April 23. That essentially opens the door for internet service providers to treat certain content differently. That has technology companies raising the alarm.

No Connecticut athletes are returning to Pyeonchang with medals.
Jeon Han / Republic of Korea

Connecticut’s eight Winter Olympians all failed to medal in the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Games.

The state’s last competitor in the games, Julia Marino of Westport, finished 10th in the women’s big air snowboarding event Thursday in Pyeongchang.

Babe Ruth in his first year with the New York Yankees in 1920.
Paul Thompson / Public Domain

Seventy years after Babe Ruth's death, a long-lost radio interview with the baseball legend has turned up in the archives of Cheshire Academy, a private school in Connecticut. It's part of a collection of interviews donated two decades ago by sports announcer Joe Hasel, an alumnus of the school.

In trying to clarify his Wednesday comments about arming teachers and other school personnel, President Trump, a day later, aligned himself even more closely with the National Rifle Association on the issue of teachers with guns and beefing up school security.

So much so, they seemed, at times, to be reading from the same script.

Here's how the day started — with NRA Executive Vice President and CEO Wayne LaPierre at the Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC (emphasis ours):

Updated at 8:32 p.m. ET

A federal grand jury unveiled new charges on Thursday against Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and his business associate Rick Gates, accusing them of a broader range of financial crimes.

Before a screening of "Black Panther," artist Martha Walker-Dawkins paints the face of Zaniah Welsh, a fourth-grader at West Hartford's Smith STEM School. Engineer David Johnson sponsored the event to inspire students.
Vanessa de la Torre / WNPR

As a child in the Midwest, David Johnson said he dreamed of becoming an engineer.

Heather Katsoulis / Creative Commons

A new lobby group is hoping to persuade Connecticut lawmakers to change the way the state votes in presidential elections. The group Making Every Vote Count is hoping to create a system where the winner of the national popular vote always wins the presidency. 

Tom Moore's head of school security recently came to him with a suggestion: trauma bags. These are tools the military often uses in battle and include clotting agents to stop massive wounds. Schools are now stocking up.

"That's not something you do lightly," said Moore, superintendent of schools in West Hartford, Conn., a leafy suburb outside the state's capital city. "I want people to understand this is the reality. This is what we have to do."

Moore said it's a sad state he finds himself in — buying items used by armed forces for teachers.

Updated at 3:40 p.m. ET

Just over a week after 17 people were killed at Parkland, Fla., high school, National Rifle Association executive vice president and CEO Wayne LaPierre gave a fiery, defiant speech at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC, on Thursday at the National Harbor in Maryland. LaPierre defended Second Amendment rights and warned of a "socialist agenda" intended to strip firearms away from law-abiding citizens.

Pages

Get The News

Trouble Keeping Up With News?

Get the WNPR email newsletter daily.

Special Coverage

WNPR's Coverage of a Drug Crisis

The nation is in the midst of a opioid crisis, and so is Connecticut.

Movies

Before a screening of "Black Panther," artist Martha Walker-Dawkins paints the face of Zaniah Welsh, a fourth-grader at West Hartford's Smith STEM School. Engineer David Johnson sponsored the event to inspire students.
Vanessa de la Torre / WNPR

STEM-Hero? Black Engineers Look To 'Black Panther' To Recruit Students Of Color

As a child in the Midwest, David Johnson said he dreamed of becoming an engineer.

Read More

A Note To Our Audience

Connecticut Public Radio's coverage of the 2018 elections.

Three exciting live events with leading Connecticut women.

The Beaker

Are Cows Pessimists?

New research sheds light on bovine cognition.

Special Coverage

Puerto Rico and Connecticut After Hurricane Maria

Follow @WNPR on Twitter

WNPR Shows

Call in to talk about where we live and who we are. Our show highlights Connecticut's diverse communities -- and we want to hear your stories.
We feature topics that vary widely from day to day. You'll hear a thoughtful, smart, interesting conversation with amazing guests.
Connecticut's best journalists come out of the political trenches every Wednesday for our weekly news roundtable.
Get ideas for easy cooking and healthful living every week.
Our weekly show is about all of New England, America's oldest place, at a time of change.