North Dakota

Tensions Escalate As Police Clear Protesters Near Dakota Access Pipeline

In North Dakota, tension over the 1,200-mile Dakota Access oil pipeline is escalating. Police and National Guard troops arrested more than 140 protesters near a construction site Thursday.The Standing Rock Sioux have sued to stop the pipeline from crossing under the Missouri River next to their reservation, claiming the project would destroy sacred sites and threaten the water supply.What started months ago as a dispute between a tribe and the federal government has escalated into clashes...
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Carol Rosegg / Westport Country Playhouse

Bridgeport Boy Brings "Camelot" to Life at Westport Playhouse

Sana Sarr is 11 years old. He goes to a magnet school in Bridgeport. He's in the sixth grade. And right now, five times a week, he opens each performance of Westport Country Playhouse’s current production of the Lerner and Loewe musical Camelot with this line: The ancient and glorious tale of King Arthur,
Queen Guinevere, and what befell them...
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Tribute Bands vs. the Originals: Who Knows the Music Better?

Tribute bands -- bands that emulate famous groups or individual performers -- are a big business. Elvis and The Beatles might be the inspiration for the tribute band trend, but tribute acts have become a subculture all their own.
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What have you always wondered about? WNPR is taking your questions.
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Updated at 3:56 p.m.

Newly discovered emails being examined by the FBI in relation to Hillary Clinton's email server came to light in the course of an unrelated criminal investigation of Anthony Weiner, a source familiar with the matter tells NPR's Carrie Johnson.

Weiner is the estranged husband of close Clinton aide Huma Abedin; he has been under scrutiny for sending illicit text messages to an underage girl.

UW Health / Creative Commons

The state is looking for a transportation company to get low-income Medicaid patients to their medical appointments.  This comes after legislators overrode a veto of a bill by Governor Dannel Malloy.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The Veterans Administration is attempting to reduce the number of former service members suffering opioid abuse and overdose. The VA is now part of a working group with the Department of Defense trying to take a comprehensive look at the problem. 

The Connecticut Mirror

Access Health CT, the state’s health care exchange, said its hoping to grow enrollment next year, despite challenges over rates, competition, and access. 

Open enrollment in health care plans for 2017 begins on Tuesday, November 1. If people want their plans to start on January 1, they must be enrolled by December 15.

When Katlyn Burbidge's son was 6 years old, he was performing some silly antic typical of a first-grader. But after she snapped a photo and started using her phone, he asked her a serious question: "Are you going to post that to Facebook?"

She laughed and answered, "Yes, I think I will." What he said next stopped her.

"Can you not?"

That's when it dawned on her: She had been posting photos of him online without asking his permission.

Amtrak has reached a $265 million settlement with people affected by last year's derailment in Philadelphia that killed eight and injured more than 200 others.

A federal judge approved the deal this morning. "The settlement is $30 million dollars less than the cap on damages for an accident like this," as NPR's Jeff Brady reports. "But attorneys for the victims say this agreement will get money to their clients more quickly than if the case were litigated."

Lisa Brettschneider flickr.com/photos/flyfarther79 / Creative Commons

The big day is almost upon us. Halloween is coming up soon, and one of the traditions is to carve a Jack O'Lantern. I like tradition, but if you're interested in something different this year in Jack O'Lanterns,  try decorating some other winter squashes, too. 

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

There are signs.

That's the message Sandy Hook Promise wants to get out to schools -- most teenagers make a warning of some kind before going on a shooting rampage, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A Connecticut man is suing the Boy Scouts of America, claiming he was sexually abused by a Boy Scout leader in the 1990s.

A Mediterranean-bound convoy of Russian warships will not be stopping for fuel at a Spanish port, Russia said Wednesday, after Spain's NATO allies objected to the refueling plan.

NATO members are worried the ships are intended to support increased Russian airstrikes in Syria. The convoy includes Russia's only aircraft carrier.

Some ships in the convoy had been planning to stop for fuel in Ceuta, a Spanish enclave in North Africa directly across from Gibraltar. It's normal practice for Spain to allow Russian warships to stop at its ports, The Associated Press reports.


2016 Election

Campaign Coverage: 2016 Election

Election Day is almost here. Catch up on the latest in campaign coverage from NPR and WNPR reporters.


As Number Of Syrian Refugees Resettled In Mass. Increases, Community Shows Support

Refugees from around the world continue to find homes in Massachusetts.The number of Syrian refugees, in particular, has more than doubled here over the last year, despite heated national rhetoric around immigration.Increased Interest Greets New RefugeesIn the basement of the First United Baptist Church in Lowell, newly arrived refugees from Syria and Afghanistan stand shoulder to shoulder with new arrivals from Somalia.Theyre all sifting through sweaters, scarves, jackets and hats, looking...
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Ray Hardman / WNPR

Left Handed Pianist's Quest for Perfection After Childhood Tragedy

When the famous Austrian pianist Paul Wittgenstein lost his right arm in World War I, composers lined up to write works for the pianist featuring the left hand only. One of those works, Maurice Ravel's "Piano Concerto for the Left Hand," will be performed this Sunday by the West Hartford Symphony Orchestra. The soloist for that performance lost the use of his right hand in an unthinkable family tragedy.
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More News: Agriculture

Lisa Brettschneider flickr.com/photos/flyfarther79 / Creative Commons

Connecticut Garden Journal: Unusual Halloween Pumpkins

The big day is almost upon us. Halloween is coming up soon, and one of the traditions is to carve a Jack O'Lantern. I like tradition, but if you're interested in something different this year in Jack O'Lanterns, try decorating some other winter squashes, too.
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The Beaker

This "Ghost" Hates The Color Green

It's a rare example of a flowering plant that doesn't have any green chlorophyll.

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Special Coverage

WNPR's Coverage of a Drug Crisis

The nation is in the midst of a opioid crisis, and so is Connecticut. We're focusing this week on special reporting.

More News: Protests

© Council Brandon

Photos: a Visit to the Standing Rock Pipeline Protest Camp in North Dakota

Since April, protesters against an oil pipeline have been camping in tents, tipis, and trailers at a site just across the Missouri River from the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota. For a few days, I stayed at the camp, and met people who gathered there to support the effort.
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More News: Code Switch

Dreadlocks Decision Raises Another Question: What Is Race?

Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act prohibits employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of several things, among them race. The law, however, doesn't define "race."It also doesn't say anything about hair.Which brings us to Chastity Jones.In 2012, Jones, who is African-American, was denied a job because she wouldn't cut off her dreadlocks. Jones sued, saying the company was guilty of race-based, disparate treatment. When the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against her...
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More News: Environment

Lori Mack / WNPR

Clean Water Advocate Stops in New Haven During Swim Across Long Island Sound

Clean water advocate Christopher Swain stopped in New Haven during a 130-mile swim from Montauk to New York City.
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More from WNPR

Out Of This World: How Artists Imagine Planets Yet Unseen

When scientists recently announced that they had discovered a new planet orbiting our closest stellar neighbor, Proxima Centuri, they also released an artist's conception of the planet.The picture of a craggy canyon, illuminated by a reddish-orange sunset, looked like an image that could have been taken on Mars by one of NASA's rovers. But the alien scene was actually completely made-up.It's part of an ever-increasing gallery of images depicting real planets beyond our solar system that, in...
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