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Students and Schools

  

This reporting initiative is made possible by the Nellie Mae Education Foundation — working to reshape public education to better prepare all students for the future.

See additional work from the Journalism and Media Academy's Youth Media project »

High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Sep 4, 2012
Mark Yaworowski

When Kerry Christianson first rode a horse, she needed people on each side of her to make sure she did not fall. Her posture was poor, and she needed to wear a special brace, so someone could hold her. Now, she is able to sit upright in her saddle, and hold her head steady. This is thanks to High Hopes Theraputic Riding in Old Lyme, Connecticut.

Real Life Survival Guide Episode 57

Aug 27, 2012
Cindy Papish Gerber

When the calendar switches from August to September, I can't help but think about the various ways I have felt about fall over the years: nervousness and corduroys, preseason soccer, returning to college, and now, getting the kids OUT OF THE HOUSE!

Senator Who?

Jul 30, 2012

HARTFORD, CT - Some politicians believe that young people, between the ages of 18 and 26, don't care about politics. Senator Grump C. Mudgeon is one of those politicans. He claims that young people don't watch the news, pick up newspapers, or even register to vote.

The CPBN Media Lab went out in search of young people at the University of Hartford and Trinity College. After showing people Grump's message, which urges youth to avoid the polls, we filmed their reactions. "Who is this?" asked Andre Dixon, former UCONN student.

Chion Wolf

As the University of Connecticut gets bigger - with more global aspirations - what does that mean for the state university system?

This fall, Dr. Elsa Núñez starts her seventh year as president of Eastern Connecticut State University. Some view it as UConn’s little sister campus in nearby Willimantic. But Núñez has bigger plans. She wants ECSU to make a name for itself as a first-choice liberal arts school.

The Rise of Women

Jul 13, 2012
UNE Photos

Women outpace men in colleges and graduate school and account for half of the workforce, so why are there still so few women in top jobs?

Because women have more education and career opportunities than ever before, because they’ve entered male-dominated fields like medicine, the military and engineering in numbers only dreamed about by their grandmothers...there’s a case that we’ve reached a kind of “gender equity.”

But women hold only 14% of corporate executive jobs.  Only a third make partner in law firms, and their wait is longer.

Youth Violence

Jul 3, 2012
Chion Wolf

When violence strikes a city – as Hartford was struck last month in a weekend of shootings that left two dead and eight wounded  – you have to ask why, and you have to ask how can we prevent this from happening again?

Especially when the violence involves young people, a city stops and ponders. One of the dead was a 16-year old Windsor High student, shot while attending a Sweet Sixteen birthday party.

Connecticut’s House of Representatives has unanimously passed a wide-ranging education reform bill. Legislators describe the bill as an important step toward improving the state’s public schools and closing Connecticut’s achievement gap.

The chamber erupted in cheers after the 149 to zero vote, giving final legislative approval to a compromise education reform measure. 

Jonathan McNicol photo

Connecticut is going for education reform. We hear from teachers this time about what reforms they think will provide the best outcomes for students.

Diane Orson

Governor Malloy was in New Haven last night for a Yale conference on the future of education. In contrast to recent town hall meetings, this time the Governor was met by a receptive audience.

Governor Malloy outlined key proposals in his school reform package to nearly 200 people at the Yale School of Management’s Education Leadership Conference.

On the highly-charged issues of teacher evaluation and tenure, the Governor said there needs to be honest and frank discussion.  

frankjuarez, creative commons

A coalition of… coalitions has coalesced in support of Governor Malloy’s education reform legislation.

The group includes organizations that support boards of education and superintendents, the business community and charter school advocates.

The Connecticut Supreme Court has ruled that Scholastic Book Clubs, Inc. must pay the state millions of dollars in taxes and penalties. The court found that teachers in the classroom act as local salespeople for the out-of-state bookseller. 

The Connecticut Supreme Court unanimously reversed a trial court judge’s decision, and ruled that Scholastic Book Clubs, Inc should pay the state more than 3 million dollars in sales tax, interest and penalties. 

Is Adult Education Right For Teens?

Mar 15, 2012

INTRO: More and more Connecticut teens are leaving high school for adult education programs. Some say these programs offer more flexibility to kids who would otherwise just drop out of school. But others say adult education is not for teens. WNPR’s Neena Satija reports.

Reporter Roundtable

Mar 13, 2012
Chion Wolf

While we’ve been obsessed with the big changes that may be coming to the state’s education system - there’s plenty more that lawmakers are considering.

On that long list: Red light cameras, hotel taxes, racial profiling, Sunday liquor sales and the death penalty. There’s also news about more firings over the D-SNAP scandal, and there’s the state of the budget in a slow-recovery economy.  Some economists are saying that it will take several more years to undo the damage of the last recession.

Union leaders representing Connecticut teachers say they agree with many of Governor Malloy’s education reform proposals, but are concerned that new teacher evaluations be used fairly. 

Earlier this year, Connecticut teachers’ unions agreed to a process that evaluates teachers based, in part, on student performance. This plays a key role in Governor Malloy’s education proposals. 

Teachers Unions

Mar 7, 2012
LizMarie_AK, creative commons

Connecticut teachers have been feeling under fire since Governor Malloy announced a sweeping new education plan.

Among the many points in his 163-page plan that’s now being debated by the legislature is a provision to change the rules on teacher tenure.

Malloy says that unions have already agreed to a deal that would tie student performance to teacher evaluations – but they’re cool to the Governor’s tenure plan.

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