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Students and Schools

  

This reporting initiative is made possible by the Nellie Mae Education Foundation — working to reshape public education to better prepare all students for the future.

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New Haven Promise

For some, the journey to higher education can feel more like a dead end -- an opportunity stifled by rising tuition fees and the weight of student loans.

Here in Connecticut however, initiatives such as New Haven Promise and Hartford Promise are working to make college more attainable to students.

This hour, we find out how. We sit down with officials from each Promise program and we also hear from you. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Over 200 Hartford teachers could be laid off as the school district grapples with declining enrollment and rising costs. 

"Free" is a word with a powerful appeal. And in the past year or so it has been tossed around a lot, followed by another word: "college."

Both Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton spent a lot of time talking about free tuition. And this week, the promise has been taken up by one of the largest public university systems in the country: New York state's.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In Bridgeport, the typical story goes something like this: A superintendent comes in eager to make his or her mark on a failing district. They stay two or three years, then they're gone.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

U.S. Education Secretary John King Jr. made a stop in New Haven Monday as he wraps up his "Opportunity Across America" tour.

If you got 13 percent back on your investments every year, you'd be pretty happy, right? Remember, the S&P 500, historically, has averaged about 7 percent when adjusted for inflation.

What if the investment is in children, and the return on investment not only makes economic sense but results in richer, fuller, healthier lives for the entire family?

WNPR/David DesRoches

Federal and state laws require students to take several standardized tests each year, but critics argue that these so-called high stakes tests aren't a reliable way to see how well students know certain subjects.

Nancy Eve Cohen / New England Public Radio

In the weeks after Election Day, in response to current events, the U.S. flag on the main flagpole at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts has alternately been flown at full-staff and half-staff, burned, removed, and now replaced.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Creative Commons

What is the future of higher education?

This hour, we preview an upcoming Connecticut Forum with one of the forum panelists -- Dr. Freeman Hrabowski, III. The President of the University of Maryland Baltimore County tells us how his school encourages diversity and innovation.

Part 1 of our series "Unlocking Dyslexia."

"It's frustrating that you can't read the simplest word in the world."

Thomas Lester grabs a book and opens to a random page. He points to a word: galloping.

"Goll—. G—. Gaa—. Gaa—. G—. " He keeps trying. It is as if the rest ­­of the word is in him somewhere, but he can't sound it out.

"I don't ... I quit." He tosses the book and it skids along the table.

Javon Franklin

A Connecticut native credits the Talcott Mountain Science Center in Avon for helping him become one of the most syndicated puzzle-makers in the world. 

mygueart/iStock / Thinkstock

A new report from Connecticut Voices for Children shows that school arrests have decreased significantly in Connecticut. But the decline wasn't nearly as steep for black and mixed race students.

WNPR/David DesRoches

Before last Thursday, David Coss warned his AP government students that he wasn't going to be in class the day right after the election.

"Common Core is a total disaster. We can't let it continue."

So said presidential candidate Donald Trump in a campaign ad on his website.

To make sure there's no confusion about where he stands on the learning standards that are now used by the vast majority of states, Trump also tweeted earlier this year:

"Get rid of Common Core — keep education local!"

www.audio-luci-store.it / Creative Commons

Some students in Connecticut will go from preschool through high school graduation without ever having a teacher of color. Some districts only have a single black teacher. Others might have only one Latino teacher.

WNPR/David DesRoches

As kids poured into David Coss's AP government and politics class, the conversations had already started.

Jameziecakes / Creative Commons

Public school superintendents in the state’s three largest cities — Bridgeport, New Haven and Hartford — have all recently announced their resignations.

This hour, we look at superintendent turnover in Connecticut.

For Ross Roberts, it was a lack of resources that drove him from the classroom. For Danielle Painton, it was too much emphasis on testing. For Sergio Gonzalez, it was a nasty political environment.

Welcome to the U.S. teaching force, where the "I'm outta here" rate is an estimated 8 percent a year — twice that of high-performing countries like Finland or Singapore. And that 8 percent is a lot higher than other professions.

COD Newsroom / Creative Commons

As traditional college graduates shoulder large student loan debt and companies hunt for skilled labor, technical and vocational high schools are garnering more attention. Do skills like 3D printing and precision machining really help students get jobs and higher wages?

This hour, we explore the value of career and technical education in Connecticut and nationwide.

Jonathan McNicol / WNPR

See, we were supposed to send a whole team of people to the first presidential debate on Long Island. We were supposed to do an episode of The Colin McEnroe Show from Hofstra.

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