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Science

The Snip

Feb 16, 2017
Ciro / flickr creative commons

Whether you're a man or a woman, if you're of reproductive age, vasectomies matter to you.

Are you a man who can't wait to get your vasectomy? Or does the very thought make you cringe? Are you a woman urging your man to get one?

Lifelikeapps / Creative Commons

This is a rebroadcast of our February 17, 2016 show on hearts. February is heart awareness month.

Heart disease is still the biggest killer in the United States, even though fewer people die from from heart attack and cardiac arrest than ever before.

Digital Vision / Thinkstock

This hour: breakthroughs in brain science.

Coming up, we take a look inside the minds of so-called "superagers" -- older adults whose brains are not only challenging the hands of time, but also raising some big questions within the scientific community. What are some of the best tips and tricks to keep your brain young and healthy? We take a closer look. 

JD Hancock / flickr creative commons

  At 8:30 pm on Thursday, September 8, 1966, NBC aired the premiere of a new series called "Star Trek". The episode was "The Man Trap." The star date was 1513.1, in case you're interested in that kind of thing.

I am not interested in that kind of thing.

Anjan Chatterjee

I find great joy in walking in the dead of winter along the river trail near my house. Everything leaves my mind as I watch the Canadian geese take flight, their wings flapping together as they lift and swoop over my head. I'm in awe of their beauty.

Old Rollei / Creative Commons

Have you ever woken in the middle of the night, looked at the clock, and noticed that it's the same time you woke up the night before - and the night before that? How does your body know what time it is?  You're not sure but the passage of minutes makes you worry that if you don't get back to sleep, you'll be too tired in the morning to get your work done on time. You can't get back to sleep. The minutes are ticking. You feel the pressure of the clock bearing down on you. 

Derek Σωκράτης Finch / flickr creative commons

So, it turns out the world didn't end last week.

And while it might seem like the events of the last year or so are the disease, maybe they're really just the symptoms; maybe they're really just signs of the dystopia around us.

But, then: Which dystopia?

DAVID SCHEEL / Flickr Creative Commons

The octopus has always been the stuff of spine-tingling legend, like that of the Kraken, the many-armed sea monster believed to drag ships to the bottom of the sea after dining on the crew. Or  Gertie the Pus, the giant Pacific octopus that lives under the Narrows Bridge connecting Tacoma, Washington to Gig Harbor.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This year marks an important milestone in our nation's history -- 35 years since the discovery of HIV/AIDS. This hour, we look back to see how far we've come in understanding, treating, and destigmatizing HIV/AIDS in America. 

Hubble ESA / Creative Commons

Scientists say that the asteroid that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia four years ago was a rare event, unlikely to happen more than every 100 -200 years. But a research in the scientific journal Nature said the earth should expect and plan to get hit by Chelyabinsk-sized asteroids more often -  maybe every decade or two! 

And we thought the election was rough. 

Ken Hawkins / Creative Commons

Whether it's red or white, boxed or bottled -- few beverages stimulate the senses quite like a glass of wine does. Still, the science behind how the human body "tastes" wine -- well, it's more complex than you might think. 

haru__q / flickr creative commons

There's a theory that ours isn't the only universe. That there are, actually, infinitely many universes.

That there are, then, infinitely many yous.

Edoardo Di Falchi / Flickr

Why is there something rather than nothing? This has been described as perhaps the most sublime philosophical question of all. Today, on The Colin McEnroe Show, we answer it. But as we do, we realize that it's not just a philosophical quandary; it's a scientific, cultural, and theological one as well.

University of Liverpool Faculty of Health & Life Sciences / Creative Commons

They're moms and mentors; mathematicians and microbiologists.

This hour: women in STEM. We hear from a team of women scientists and engineers, and consider what's being done to foster the next wave of female STEM leaders. 

Ryan Lackey / Flickr

As social creatures we know that isolation can be emotionally difficult, but research shows that it can be psychologically damaging as well. So why then, would anyone live this way by choice? This hour, we hear two such cases of isolated living.

Guillaume Flament / flickr creative commons

Colin is back, and we've got some questions, and we're guessing you do too.

Javon Franklin

A Connecticut native credits the Talcott Mountain Science Center in Avon for helping him become one of the most syndicated puzzle-makers in the world. 

Every morning in a government office building in Boulder, Colo., about a dozen people type a code into a door and line up against a wall on the other side. There are a couple of guys in military uniform, and some scientists in Hawaiian shirts. They work at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and they're here for a daily space weather forecast.

What can you say about the sun? It sits not only at the center of our solar system but has, over time, been at the center of religions, scriptures, songs, art and countless other aspects of our culture.

Jeng_Niamwhan/iStock / Thinkstock

Why are some people more susceptible to addiction than others? How does genetic makeup influence a person’s chances of becoming an addict? This hour, we find out how researchers at Yale University and The Jackson Laboratory are working to better understand the science of addiction. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In a world of buzzing smartphones, endless meetings and persistent deadlines, how can we be more in-tune with ourselves and more creative in our endeavors?

This hour, we talk mindfulness and creativity in the 21st century.

A large space rock came fairly close to Earth on Sunday night. Astronomers knew it wasn't going to hit Earth, thanks in part to a new tool NASA is developing for detecting potentially dangerous asteroids.

An experimental lander from the European Space Agency is making its final descent toward Mars, preparing for a controlled landing on Wednesday.

The Schiaparelli probe detached from its mothership, the Trace Gas Orbiter, on Sunday.

There was a moment of alarm when, after separating from the ship, Schiaparelli didn't send the expected signals back to scientists on earth. It did send back a "carrier signal" to show it was operational, but didn't communicate any telemetry data about its status or location.

Pez Owen was flying over the desert in her single-engine Cessna airplane when she spotted a huge "X" etched in the desert below. She says it was the strangest thing.

"It's not on the [flight] chart," Owen says. "There just wasn't any indication of this huge cross."

Then she spotted another one.

"There had to be some reason," she says. "So, of course, I immediately thought I had to get Chuck in on this."

JONATHAN MCNICOL / WNPR

In the more than six years that it's been on the air, we've never taken The Colin McEnroe Show to the Peabody Museum before. (Crazy, right?) And: In the more than six years that it's been on the air, we've never done a Colin McEnroe Show about dinosaurs before. (Crazy! Right!?)

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