WNPR

Higher education

Death At College

May 17, 2012

As colleges around the region wrap up for the year, we turn our attention to a surprising and disturbing fact. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students. 

In April, a 19-year old Yale University freshman - Zachary Brunt of Alexandria, Virginia –  took his own life.  He was found dead in a physics lab. 

The following story is in two parts. We begin by hearing the voices of two friends of Zach’s. 

PART ONE

Before Alie Garry could enroll at Tunxis Community College, in Farmington, Conn., the 18-year old Simsbury resident had to take a required standardized test called, ominously, the “Accuplacer.” It told her what she might not have wanted to hear - that she needed remedial classes in math and English. But now, three years later, she is grateful for the Accuplacer.

A recent report by the US Department of Education’s Office of Inspector General finds inadequate enforcement of a federal law aimed at preventing alcohol and drug abuse on college campuses.   The review was requested by two state lawmakers on behalf of a Connecticut resident.

Dr. Suzanne Campbell

Fairfield University is participating in the nationwide initiative, Joining Forces, to to help veterans. WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil spoke with the Dean of the School Of Nursing, Dr Suzanne Campbell.

Unless Congress acts, interest rates on certain college loans are set to double this summer.  WNPR looks at what that would mean for Connecticut students.

More than 84 thousand college and university students in Connecticut had subsidized Stafford student loans last year.  Their interest rate was 3.4% thanks to the College Cost Reduction and Access Act which locked in a low rate for four years. 

Flickr Creative Commons, cbsawallich

We tend to see familiar patterns in the life around us. When a Trinity student was badly beaten on a street bordering the college, we saw violence coming from the neighborhood. When the Hartford police released a description of the suspects as white women and men in their twenties, many of us didn't let that alter our understanding of what had happened.

But in the four weeks since the assault, other versions of the story have trickled out across the campus and through the city.

Real Life Survival Guide Episode 40

Apr 1, 2012
Cindy Papish Gerber

Our friends at Sitar in New Haven were kind enough to keep their amazing buffet open a little later than usual on a recent Sunday afternoon, and the result was a rollicking editorial meeting for the RLSG!

We talked about April Fool's Day (of course!), college admissions - and meatballs - with guest editors Joanne Kahan, Kim Garley-Erb, Erika Horne and David Bailin.

Joanne Kahan describes herself as a “sometimes bored suburban housewife, volunteer, and retired mother”. (Which, translated, means she's an empty nester exploring new paths!)

Frog Hollow Riled By Assumptions On Trinity Attack

Mar 30, 2012
By Amherst2005 (www.creativecommons.org)

Almost a month after a Trinity College student was brutally attacked in the middle of the night just outside campus, it’s still not clear who his assailants were. College administrators have demanded better security in the surrounding neighborhood, frustrating nearby residents who say they’ve been unfairly blamed time and again. WNPR’s Neena Satija reports on their reactions.

pascal, creative commons

Playing to a red-meat conservative crowd, Rick Santorum called President Obama a “snob” for saying people should go to college.

This statement - and others like it about the liberal “indoctrination” that happens on college campuses - obviously set off millions of educated Americans.

And not just because the value of higher education was being challenged - but because his statement flies in the face of everything we know about what people need to get jobs in America.

Those with college degrees get jobs more readily - and those jobs pay better wages.  

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Thousands of troops are home from Iraq - and soon from Afghanistan - to a country that, in many ways, barely noticed they were gone. These wars have been fought at such a distance from a public that was told to “go shopping” to support a war effort, that we don’t have the impact of similar returns from Vietnam or World War 2.

Chion Wolf

Today we'll profile an interesting program happening at Central Connecticut State University within the English Department.  It’s in collaboration with the “Veteran’s Project” which is putting together a “Welcome Home” event on March 31 at the Armory in Hartford. English professor Mary Collins is working with her creative writing students to tell Veteran's stories. 

http://cptv.vo.llnwd.net/o2/ypmwebcontent/Catie/Where%20We%20Live%2003-14-2012%20Seg%20B.mp3

Officials from UConn and the Board of Regents meet this week with legislators and advocates for victims of sexual assault to discuss a bill that would change the way college campuses respond to sexual violence.  

The federal Clery Act spells out how colleges and universities nationwide are expected to respond to sexual violence on campus. The Connecticut bill would make changes to the way schools hold internal disciplinary hearings, and would require prevention programming for students and faculty.

Sean MacEntee (Flickr Creative Commons)

The Yale Muslim Students Association was shocked to learn over the weekend that the New York Police Department spied on their organization in 2006 and 2007.

Real Life Survival Guide Episode 30

Jan 21, 2012
Cindy Papish Gerber

We gathered to record Episode 30 at Cafe Romeo, the hip, delicious East Rock coffee shop. We were joined by Anne Witkavitch, Kristin Huffman, and Mark Branch, and hosted by Chris Mordececai.

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