WNPR

Higher education

Veterans are among college students heading back to class this fall. At the University of Connecticut, more than 400 students have military experience. They're considered non-traditional students given the fact many enroll after multiple deployments. WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports on one way campuses are working to accommodate their needs. 

You've probably heard of New Haven Promise by now.  It's a scholarship program funded by Yale University and community partners which awards New Haven public school students who show academic potential.

But the Promise program isn't just about paying tuition for some.

WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil spoke with New Haven Promise Executive Director Emily Brynes about the program's community outreach.

 

Photo by Expert Infantry Courtesy of Flickr CC

A group of computer students at Trinity College have created a smartphone app to improve disaster relief management.  As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the project aims to help Haitians recovering from the 2010 earthquake.

Trinity is part of a collaboration between Wesleyan University and Connecticut College to create free software that benefits the common good. It's funded by the National Science Foundation.

Governor Malloy visited Wesleyan University in Middletown on Monday.  He met with leaders of Connecticut’s private colleges and universities to talk jobs.

The Connecticut Conference of Independent Colleges represents 16 schools that employ over 22,000 people.  

Diane Orson

More than 100 students were honored on Thursday as the first class of New Haven Promise.  That’s the new scholarship program that provides college tuition for city students. 

Wearing caps and gowns, New Haven public high school graduates filed into Sprague Hall on the Yale University campus.  Parents beamed.  City and state officials told the students that the Promise scholarship program was an expression of confidence in their promise for a brighter future.   

Chion Wolf

Dozens of teenagers, the children of recent immigrants, turned out for a ceremonial bill signing with Governor Dannel Malloy today in New Haven. As WNPR’s Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, advocates for the in state tuition bill that became law July 1, say  the moment was a long time coming.

The crowd of college hopefuls cheered Gov Malloy as he signed the bill inside the lobby of Wilbur Cross High School. Joining the young adults were immigrant advocates and congregational members who lobbied for the bill in their home communities across Fairfield and New Haven counties.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by No Vision

On Thursday, Governor Dannel Malloy will attend a ceremonial bill signing for a measure that will help illegal immigrant students.

The in state tuition law went into effect July 1, allowing undocumented students who enroll at a state university or community college to be eligible for the in-state tuition rate. As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the schools are streamlining the admissions process so these students will be billed correctly.

Two men were arraigned last month in connection with an alleged sexual assault at Southern Connecticut State University. SCSU is part of a consortium of Connecticut colleges and universities that are working together to reduce violence against women. As part of our continuing series on campus safety, WNPR's Diane Orson reports. 

The statistic is hard to believe. A U.S. Department of Justice study finds one in five women will become a victim of rape or attempted rape while in college.

"This is a not talked about phenomena"  

More than 800 students graduate tonight from Gateway Community College in New Haven. Many took their first steps into higher education through the school’s open door policy.  But budget shortfalls could end open admissions at community colleges in Connecticut. Walk down the corridor at Gateway Community College and you’ll see a diverse mix of students – teenagers right out of high school, mothers in their early 30s, even senior citizens.  

More than 800 students graduate tonight from Gateway Community College in New Haven.  Many took their first steps into higher education through the school’s open door policy.  But, budget shortfalls could end open admissions at community colleges in Connecticut.

Walk down the corridor at Gateway Community College and you’ll see a diverse mix of students – teenagers right out of high school, mothers in their early 30's, even senior citizens.  

courtesy eGen

Connecticut would like to reinvent itself as the next Silicon Valley. Some economic development experts say our future lies with the state’s small technology companies. If that’s to become a reality, Connecticut’s universities will have to be a key part of the change. A conference today at UConn aims to show the way. 

A bill that would allow undocumented students to pay in-state tuition rates has passed in the state House and now moves to the Senate.  

The legislation would allow students who have graduated from a Connecticut high school after attending for at least four years to be eligible for the state tuition rate at a public college or university.

A similar bill was vetoed by former Governor Jodi Rell in 2007. But this year, Democratic Governor Dannel Malloy says he'll sign the bill into law.

Malloy's support is embraced by undocumented students like Carolina Bortolleto.

Werwin15, Creative Commons

Could our higher education system, once seen as a great equalizer, actually be adding to the nation’s inequalities?

As high schoolers grapple with the grueling spring admissions process, one author argues that students’ true courses into college are forged by many factors other than their grades.

In her book Degrees of Inequality: Culture, Class, and Gender in American Higher Education, Ann Mullen analyses two New Haven schools.

Governor Dannel Malloy has written a letter to federal officials asking them to delay deporting a college student. As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the Governor's intervention stems from his support of immigration reform efforts that would allow college students to receive permanent legal status.

Mariano Cardoso is an illegal immigrant from Mexico who has lived in the U.S. for most of his life after his parents brought him here when he was a baby.

Chion Wolf

Susan Herbst is the new President of the University of Connecticut.  She says the state needs a school it can “brag on.”

Coming from the University System of Georgia, she says that’s a “Southern” code phrase for making UConn a flagship University in the mold of Michigan or Berkeley - an internationally recognized research center that has a powerful “academic brand.”

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