Higher education

In Rhode Island, Brown University has announced that it will use one-hundred million dollars to diversify its campus, to try to make the school more inclusive for students of color. This comes after weeks of protests over racial insensitivity on campuses across the country.

Brown University President Christina Paxson is out with a plan to address racial and class inequity on campus. 

Jessica Hill / AP Photo

The 2011 consolidation of Connecticut’s regional and community colleges hasn’t worked out so well. Administrative costs have gone up, it’s still hard for students to transfer credits from community to four-year colleges, and the system faces budget deficits that will require painful cuts. But a new proposal calling for give backs from employees has unleashed a furious backlash. 

Sage Ross / flickr creative commons

In what will not be the final game played on a natural grass surface at Yale Bowl, Harvard beat Yale 38 to 19, clinching a share of the Ivy League football title on Saturday in West Haven.

The number of international students studying at U.S. colleges and universities jumped last year — in a big way. It's up 10 percent, to roughly 975,000, according to a new report by the Institute of International Education and backed by the State Department.

In 2014-15, China was still the largest source of students with 31 percent of the total. India was in second place with nearly 14 percent. And Indian students were a big reason for the overall jump.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Yale University's president is announcing several changes in response to concerns expressed by students through demonstrations and meetings with university officials about the racial climate and diversity on campus.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

It was a chilly November day on Yale’s New Haven campus. Bulky headphones covered my ears, and a recorder dangled from a strap around my neck, connected to a big fluffy microphone.

Heading toward me on a sidewalk were several pairs of female students in athletic gear. The first few women were white, but there was a black woman in the last pair. I wanted to ask her about the climate on Yale’s campus, but I stopped myself. I imagined her being offended that I didn’t stop to ask her light-skinned peers the same question.

Charlie Smart / WHUS

Students and faculty at the University of Connecticut joined in a demonstration Monday speaking out against discrimination and intolerance on campus following the deadly attacks in Paris. 

Muslim Coalition of Connecticut‎ / Facebook

An event this weekend in Hartford honors people and institutions of higher education that have worked to build bridges between Muslims and their larger community.

UMass-Amherst Protesters Want New Seal And Mascot

Nov 13, 2015
Kevin Roche

Some students at UMass Amherst want the university to change its mascot and seal, which they say are legacies of racism.

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

Just days after the University of Missouri's chancellor and the system president resigned under pressure from students, another college leader is facing a crucial moment.

DonkeyHotey / Creative Commons

There was one moment in Tuesday's Republican presidential debate that reminded us of all those other unwieldy, freewheeling and circus-like debates that came before: Rand Paul getting cut off by Carly Fiorina, and then Donald Trump drawing boos for being Trump. For the most part, though, last night’s debate was much more orderly. It was so orderly that rarely did the candidates, who had complained so loudly about previous moderators, get challenged on any of their statements.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Hundreds of Yale University students marched through campus on Monday afternoon against what they said is a hostile climate. 

JECO Photo / Creative Commons

Across the U.S., low-income, first-generation college students are not graduating at the same rate as some of their wealthier peers. 

Updated 6:10 p.m. ET

Amid continued pressure, the University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe and the chancellor of the Columbia campus, R. Bowen Loftin, both tendered their resignations on Monday.

Wolfe announced his resignation this morning and by late afternoon, Loftin had followed suit, saying he would leave his post as chancellor at the end of this year.

"I take full responsibility for this frustration, and I take full responsibility for the inaction that has occurred," Wolfe said.

Peter Hapak / anagasteyer.com

You may best remember Ana Gasteyer eating Alec Baldwin's Schweddy Balls as Margaret Jo, the NPR co-host of The Delicious Dish on "Saturday Night Live." She was also a real-life Broadway actor and cabaret singer, and she just released her new album of jazz standards, I'm Hip. We talk about her upcoming appearance at the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center on November 24, part of CPTV's new national music series, The Kate.

George Chochos.

Lawmakers in Washington are considering federal criminal justice reform legislation, as some 6,000 inmates are released nationwide, part of the largest one-time release of federal prisoners in U.S. history.

An ex-offender from Connecticut is in Washington, DC today to tell his story as part of Senate and House briefings with faith leaders.

Matthew / Flickr Creative Commons

Across America, low-income, first generation college students are not graduating at the same rate as some of their wealthier peers. Coming up, we take a closer look at this trend with WAMU reporter Kavitha Cardoza. Her documentary is called “Lower Income, Higher Ed."  

Yale University

Yale University has recently added 4,400 solar panels to the roof of a storage building on the school's West Campus, prompting officials to say it may be the largest solar installation in Connecticut at this time.

Wikimedia User: Wasted Time R / Creative Commons

A fraternity at Quinnipiac University has been shut down due to hazing allegations for the second time this semester.

It’s pretty mind-blowing to take in the who’s who list of luminaries who passed through Black Mountain College between 1933 and 1957.

Composer John Cage is one of them. He premiered “Sonata V” from his groundbreaking “Sonatas and Interludes” at the school in 1948.

The Community College of Rhode Island plans to open a new facility in Westerly to train workers for Electric Boat.

The company needs welders and other specialized employees to build nuclear submarines. Rhode Island Education Commissioner Jim Purcell said the new center is part of an effort to be more responsive to Electric Boat and other companies.

Wesleyan University / Wikimedia Commons

Funding for Wesleyan University's school newspaper has been slashed by the student government. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

After weeks of dismissing the idea of a special session, more bad budget news is pushing Governor Dannel Malloy in that direction. On our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we discuss this and all the week's news, including an update on a plan by the state's Board of Regents that has professors fighting mad.

Rhode Island Researchers Get $2M For Tick Study

Oct 20, 2015

A tick researcher at the University of Rhode Island will use $2 million in federal grant funding to study tick repellent clothing. Professor Tom Mather plans to test garments that have been treated with a chemical called permethrin. If it’s effective, Mather said it could have serious public health benefits.

“Ticks up here transmit multiple diseases,” said Mather. “Lyme disease is of course what everyone hears about, but just as dangerous probably more dangerous are some of the infections that black legged ticks in our area carry.”

Crinklecrankle.com / Creative Commons

Trinity College wants to use artificial turf on some of its athletic fields, but the City of Hartford has pushed back, and now the two are in state court. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

There's a debate over whether college should prepare kids with specific skills that will prepare them for jobs, or give them a wide-ranging but more general liberal arts education. 

Matthias Rosenkranz / Creative Commons

Members of the University of Connecticut community have begun a couple of fundraisers hoping to offset the negative image generated by a video of a student berating food service workers who refused to sell him jalapeño-bacon macaroni and cheese.

On Campus, Older Faculty Keep On Keepin' On

Oct 9, 2015

Ken Nickerson could have retired from his job as a professor of biological sciences at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln 10 years ago, when he turned 62.

He could have retired five years ago, when the university offered faculty a year's salary to step down as part of a buyout to encourage more of them to leave.

He could have retired last year, when, in yet another buyout offer, administrators dangled the equivalent of 90 percent of one full year's salary in front of faculty who would finally agree to go.

But Nickerson stayed.

Humans have been harnessing energy from rivers for thousands of years. Think water wheels from Ancient Greece and modern hydropower plants, like the Hoover Dam. Brown University engineers have a new take on a hydropower device that could harness enough energy to power communities in remote locations or along fast-flowing rivers.

Thomas Autumn / Flickr Creative Commons

A recent New York Times op-ed drew attention to Yale University’s endowment and how the money is spent. The report found more was spent on private equity fund managers than to students. This has prompted renewed debate and criticism over big endowments at big schools. But the argument isn’t new. This hour, a conversation with higher education experts about the management of endowment money at the nation’s elite schools.