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trains

  One of the items that did not make it to the final version of the $40 billion state budget approved a week late by the Massachusetts legislature was a high-speed rail study.  Specifically, a requirement that MassDOT do a report on the costs and benefits of linking Springfield and Boston via high-speed rail.

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

Even on a good day, New York City's Pennsylvania Station barely works. And with a massive summer repair project underway at the nation's busiest train station, commuters across the region are bracing for what New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has dubbed the "summer of hell."

City of New Haven

A months-long debate over who will control New Haven’s train station has been settled. The state and city have struck a deal.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Communities along Connecticut’s southeastern shore want faster, reliable train service to Washington, D.C, New York, and Boston -- but not if it skips their local train stations. A proposed federal plan for high speed rail would do just that.

John H Gray / Creative Commons

Proponents of a plan to bring expanded intercity passenger rail service to western Massachusetts are getting support from Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy.

The proposed high-speed rail in the Northeast Corridor has hit a bump. After pushback from residents in Connecticut and Rhode Island, the Federal Rail Administration says it’s willing to modify the plan due to residents' worries that the new route would run right through historic districts.  

Loco Steve / Creative Commons

Opponents of a new rail bypass plan for shoreline Connecticut want to see intervention from state lawmakers. Two bills before the General Assembly would mandate that changes to the state’s rail service could only take place after referendums in affected communities.

In late December last year, the Federal Railroad Administration released the latest iteration of its plan to upgrade the Northeast Corridor, including rerouting the line in several places. The aim is to be able to accommodate much higher speed trains.

Gov. Gina Raimondo's position statement came as a welcome surprise to dozens of protestors gathered at the Statehouse Wednesday.

Residents and lawmakers had crammed into the Statehouse rotunda to protest federal plans to move rail infrastructure in parts of Charlestown and Westerly. Then, Charlestown Town Councilor Virginia Lee told the crowd the governor agreed with them.

John H Gray / Creative Commons

Train travel in the Northeast might soon be faster, more accessible and more reliable, but a lot of this relies on the federal government.

This hour — rail in Connecticut. Is it on the right track?

Hundreds came out New Year's Day to ride the train in New York City, cheering as it left the station. That may sound odd, but this wasn't just any subway or any old station, it was the stuff of urban legend: the Second Avenue subway line.

To understand the crowd, you have to go back to the 1920s when the idea for the subway line was first floated, but never left the station because the Depression hit.

The idea was revived again in the 1950s as a replacement for the elevated trains, but city planner Robert Moses decided to spend money building expressways instead.

Federal Railroad Administration

The Federal Railroad Administration has issued a new plan for a controversial changes to the Northeast Corridor, but its fresh solution has no fans here in Connecticut. The original proposal, for an elevated bypass carrying high speed rail through Old Lyme, caused a storm of protest, as town residents said it would create an eyesore in the picturesque shoreline town. 

Amtrak has reached a $265 million settlement with people affected by last year's derailment in Philadelphia that killed eight and injured more than 200 others.

A federal judge approved the deal this morning. "The settlement is $30 million dollars less than the cap on damages for an accident like this," as NPR's Jeff Brady reports. "But attorneys for the victims say this agreement will get money to their clients more quickly than if the case were litigated."

Harriet Jones / WNPR

A new railroad investment is about to get underway in eastern Connecticut that its backers hope will be a boost for the economy right along the tracks and into greater New England.

The brakes on the New Jersey Transit train that crashed into the platform at Hoboken Terminal on Sept. 29 show no signs of any defect. That's according to a preliminary report by the National Transportation Safety Board released Thursday.

One person on the platform was killed and more than 100 passengers and crew members were injured.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating Saturday night’s crash and derailment between two trains on the Long Island Rail Road’s Main Line in Nassau County.

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