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Ryan Caron King / WNPR

For Nutmeggers who drive to work on the state’s jam-packed highways or pile into Metro-North trains during the morning rush, the thought of commuting by sea might seem like a tranquil alternative -- but not necessarily a realistic transit option.

The executive director of the Beacon-based non-profit Hudson River Sloop Clearwater has resigned. His resignation comes just one week after Clearwater announced it was cancelling its annual music festival.

Less than 24 hours after reports of their detention emerged, 10 U.S. Navy personnel have been freed by Iran. The sailors left an Iranian naval base on Farsi Island in the Persian Gulf on Wednesday morning, along with the boats they were operating when they were taken into custody.

"There are no indications that the sailors were harmed during their brief detention," the Department of Defense says, confirming the release of nine men and one woman.

New Bedford Whaling Museum

A new project is using log books from historic whaling vessels to get a broader look at climate change in the Arctic. The project, called Old Weather: Whaling, is getting help from citizen scientists.

AmistadVoyages.org / Amistad America

A Connecticut judge has ended state receivership over the Amistad schooner and dissolved the embattled organization that had operated the vessel.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

The state fire marshal and local police are investigating a blaze aboard a lobster boat at Stonington Town Dock. The fire is thought to have broken out in the early hours of Wednesday morning, and may have been burning for some time before the alarm was raised at about 4.30 am.

Updated 5:30 p.m. ET

Extinguishing hope that the cargo ship that went missing near the Bahamas could have survived a Thursday encounter with Hurricane Joaquin, the Coast Guard announced Monday that the ship, El Faro, sank, according to the Associated Press. The Coast Guard also found an unidentified body of one crew member.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Each weekday morning at the bank of the Connecticut River, a short line of cars begins to form. A part of Route 148 is closed off — the river runs through it. But at 7:00 am, a gate swings open, and the Chester-Hadlyme Ferry reconnects the route. 

Daniel Feingold / Hartford Jazz Society

More than a half-century ago, a small, devout band of jazz-loving members of a then obscure, but courageous group called The Hartford Jazz Society launched HJS’s first riverboat jazz cruise on the Connecticut River.

Ed G (Flickr Creative Commons)

The Connecticut Attorney General has proposed selling a historic ship to a nonprofit in order to pay off its $2.2 million debt.

phoca2004 / Creative Commons

The federal government has given a non-profit group ownership of an iconic lighthouse that sits in the middle of the Thames River between New London and Groton near Long Island Sound.

Bullion Vault / Creative Commons

The history of gold is a history of beauty, bloodshed and obsession. Gold has been fought for, worn ornamentally, traded as tender and at times even worshiped. This hour, we continue to mine it, covet it, and find uses for it even King Midas himself would never have imagined.

But why has the allure of this precious metal endured for so long? Investors will say its rarity ensures its worth. Numismatists will point to its ancient uses as currency to justify the appeal. And scientists may point to its uses in electronics and space travel as a means of explaining its value.

Steve Freitag / Creative Commons

Two historically significant European tall ships are in southern New England and are open to the public for tours.

The French Navy Frigate L'Hermione arrived at Fort Adams in Newport, Rhode Island and the N.R.P Sagres, a Portuguese educational training vessel, sailed into New Bedford, Massachusetts, both on Wednesday.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The family of a Greenwich man who disappeared during a honeymoon cruise ten years ago has joined U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut to call for new safety requirements for cruise lines. 

The European Union has presented a proposal to the United Nations aiming to stem the flood of migrants from the Middle East and Africa to Europe. The plan includes seizing and destroying the boats that smugglers are using to transport the migrants across the Mediterranean Sea. The EU's foreign policy chief, Federica Mogherini, briefed the U.N. Security Council on the proposal Monday morning. "We need to count on your support to save lives," Mogherini told council members.

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