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Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut’s chief state’s attorney believes some of the latest reforms to the juvenile justice system may have gone too far. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Juvenile justice reform often focuses on changing a system in which the majority of delinquents are boys. But how do courts and community providers address the needs of girls?

This hour, we find out what advocates have learned from a new report on girls in Connecticut's juvenile justice system. 

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy signed several bills into law on Wednesday that he says will reform the state’s criminal justice system and make it easier for poor people to make bail, and avoid incarceration.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has been a passionate proponent of expanding school choice, including private school vouchers and charter schools, and she has the clear backing of President Trump. But does the research justify her enthusiasm?

Experts say one single, overarching issue bedevils their efforts to study the impact of school choice programs. That is: It's hard to disentangle the performance of a school from the selection of its students.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Battling lawmakers, a multi-billion dollar deficit, and the end of a gubernatorial era. April was -- without doubt -- an eventful month for state politics. 

This hour, we hear from the man at the helm of it all: Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy. With less than two years left to go, how does he plan to round off his second -- and final -- term in office? We find out and also we also hear from you.

Basheer Tome / Creative Commons

A plan to consolidate operations within Connecticut’s State Colleges and Universities system — to save millions — has roiled staff and raised questions about how well the schools can respond to the needs of students in their communities.

This hour, we talk about the Board of Regents decision and we want to hear from you.

Shannon Hicks / The Newtown Bee

In their new documentary, Kim Snyder and Maria Cuomo Cole provide an eye-opening narrative of life after Sandy Hook -- the deadly mass shooting that thrust Connecticut and gun reform into the national spotlight. This hour, we sit down with the filmmakers and learn about the multi-year journey that brought "Newtown" to the screen. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A new report gives voice to some of Connecticut's youngest domestic violence victims -- children six years old and younger. This hour, we take a look at the findings from that report and consider what’s being done to improve services for children who experience trauma. 

Criminal Justice Reform: What's At Stake?

Dec 28, 2016
Neil Conway/flickr creative commons

The U.S. locks up more people than any other country in the world, with 2.3 million people behind bars. One-third of the U.S. population has a criminal record. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Second chances are often talked about in relation to conversations about prison reform, but rarely do we hear from those who actually need them. This hour, we take a look at Connecticut’s “Second Chance Society” through the eyes of a former inmate

Creative Commons/Static.Pexels.com

Hundreds of prison inmates across Connecticut will now have access to federal grant money to help pay for college. 

CGP Grey / Creative Commons

President Obama just signed into law a new and long awaited Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Officially called the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act, it’s expected to radically change how the federal government oversees thousands of chemicals used in products and in the workplace.

Lucy Nalpathanchil

Over the past three years, juvenile court judges in Connecticut handled 6,900 cases on average. 

President Obama called it "a Christmas miracle. A bipartisan bill signing right here."

The "right here" was the South Court Auditorium, part of the White House complex. More importantly, the bipartisan bill being signed was the Every Student Succeeds Act — a long-overdue replacement of the unpopular federal education law known as No Child Left Behind.

The U.S. Senate is expected to vote as soon as Wednesday on replacing the nation's big education law, known since 2001 as No Child Left Behind.

And President Obama is expected to sign the new version, ending an era marked by bitter fights between the federal government, states and schools.

So as it dies, we thought an obituary was in order.

Yup, an obituary. Because the law's critics and defenders all agree on one thing: No Child Left Behind took on a life of its own.

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