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Ryan Caron King, WNPR

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Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim is pleased with his first year back in office -- in fact he’s given himself a B-plus. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Municipalities in Connecticut and across the country have taken steps to protect undocumented immigrants. But what makes a so-called sanctuary city? 

CSpan

This fiscal year Connecticut received 44 grants from the Department of Justice totaling more than $44 million. It's this funding which could be partially at risk under Attorney General Jeff Sessions new directive on sanctuary cities. 

Attention is on President Trump’s failed health care plan and possible ties to Russia. But U.S. Senator Chris Murphy, D-Conn., says the Trump administration is quietly sending hundreds of new troops to Syria. Murphy took issue with the troop increase in an op-ed for the Huffington Post and the Hartford Courant.

Lindsay Kinkade / Creative Commons

Are tolls coming back to Connecticut? Yes, we’ve heard this before -- but the state Speaker of the House now says tolls are "inevitable."

This hour, we talk with Democratic State Representative Joe Aresimowicz and Republican leader, Senator Len Fasano about that and other budget decisions facing Connecticut lawmakers.

@SeemaCMS / Twitter

Republican efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare have officially failed, and President Donald Trump said he's waiting for the health insurance marketplace to explode. But what will that mean for Connecticut?

The Justice Department is following through on an executive order to withhold as much as $4.1 billion in federal grants from so-called "sanctuary cities," generally defined as places where local law enforcement limit their cooperation with federal authorities on immigration enforcement.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Connecticut activists who oppose President Donald Trump's agenda say they're energized by the defeat of the Republicans' health care overhaul, and ready for the next fight.

Updated 8:15 p.m. ET

The head of the House Intelligence Committee secretly went to the White House grounds to meet with a source, before he surprised his colleagues by briefing the president — and the press — on information they hadn't seen.

The revelation, first reported by CNN and later confirmed by a spokesman for the chairman, Rep. Devin Nunes, is the latest twist in the strange saga of Nunes' unorthodox actions last week.

Phil Roeder / Creative Commons

Conservative politicians love to cut funding for the arts: Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Newt Gingrich, and now, Donald Trump. The arts can't do anything tangible, like build a wall, or cure cancer. Too often, they fail the conservative litmus test for decency. Yet, the arts are essential to our humanity, our hopes, and often, our healing.

Immigrant rights activists in Connecticut want communities to know that a federal Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agent dressed as a local police officer in Hartford earlier this month. That was confirmed by Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin this week.

Electric Boat

During confirmation hearings for Labor Secretary nominee Alexander Acosta, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy urged the nominee to commit to workforce training programs that could be cut in Trump's budget proposal. 

President Trump was downright low energy.

The look on his face, as he meandered through unscripted remarks Friday after the defeat of the Republican health care plan he supported, told the story. The unusually subdued Trump called the loss a "learning experience." Then he seemed to shrug it all off and said he was moving on.

Editor's Note: This story includes videos and descriptions of violent encounters between police and civilians, as well as language that may not be appropriate for all readers.

The House Intelligence Committee's investigation into the Trump campaign's potential connections to Russia's election meddling isn't dead — but it's not exactly dancing a jig, either.

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