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Political news from WNPR

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President Donald Trump made clear on the first day of his presidency Saturday that he intends to undermine the press. He sent Press Secretary Sean Spicer to use the power of his pulpit to deliberately deceive the public about the size of the crowd at Friday's Inauguration. In a twist on reality, Spicer promoted a lie as truth and truth as reported by the media as a lie - despite visual and statistical evidence that exposed the reality. Yet, the office carries authority and many will believe the White House over the press. How does the press rationally react to president Trump?

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Recently we asked you what questions you have about how your town government works.

This hour, two listeners join us to ask their questions and we try to answer them.

Updated at 9:00 a.m. ET

The Trump Administration spent its first full day in office taking shots at the media and arguing about crowd sizes at Friday's inauguration.

Press Secretary Sean Spicer delivered a fiery broadside against the Fourth Estate from the White House Briefing Room Saturday evening, claiming that reporters had engaged in "deliberately false reporting" in the past 24 hours since President Trump took the oath of office. And, after berating the press, he walked away without taking any questions.

Donald Trump's first day in office has been marked by much of the same discord that characterized his campaign.

In the hours after his inauguration, the newly sworn-in President began some of the work of governing – even as hundreds of thousands of people gathered in cities across the country, and around the world, to protest Trump's presidency.

Women descend on Washington

The streets of Washington looked vastly different the day after Donald J. Trump's inauguration than they did the day-of. Instead of the largely white crowds that lined Pennsylvania Avenue on Inauguration Day, people of all colors, classes and ages filled the streets for what's being called the most diverse march for women's rights ever.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

As women around the world mobilized to protest the presidency of Donald Trump, Connecticut residents marched in Washington, D.C. and in Hartford by the thousands.

Ed Boutin, 62, stood to the side of the road wearing a biker vest with pins, patches and flags, and sporting a "Navy Veteran" hat. He said he traveled from Springfield, Mass. to watch Donald J. Trump, his candidate of choice, get sworn in to the nation's highest office.

The current state of race relations in America is the result of Barack Obama's presidency, Boutin said. But maybe, he said, the new administration can fix things.

Diane Orson / WNPR

Dozens of Democratic lawmakers nationwide said they would not attend Friday's presidential inauguration of Donald Trump. But Connecticut’s congressional delegation planned to be there, along with Governor Dannel Malloy -- and many Connecticut residents as they arrive to protest as part of Saturday's Women's March on Washington.

Tim Brown / Creative Commons

As Donald Trump was inaugurated as the 45th President of the United States, NPR covered it live.

As Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th U.S. president, protests, demonstrations — and a few celebrations — were underway in cities around the world.

In London, demonstrators holding anti-Trump signs gathered outside the U.S. Embassy on Friday evening. Earlier in the day, huge banners saying "Build Bridges Not Walls" were hung across the city's bridges, part of a U.K. campaign that that began after Trump was elected in November.

Much of the news about President Donald Trump's inaugural festivities has focused on the musicians who were invited to perform, and for various reasons -- mostly political -- declined the offer. But it's not unheard of for an artist of one political stripe to perform at the inauguration of a president from the opposing party. 

Chelsea Beck / NPR

Donald Trump delivered his first address as president, touching upon many of the themes of his campaign.

A newly inaugurated Donald J. Trump delivered a fiercely populist and often dark address, promising to transfer power in Washington from political elites to the people and vowing to put "America first."

Surrounded by members of Congress and the Supreme Court, the nation's 45th president repeated themes from his historic and divisive campaign message, describing children in poverty, schools in crisis and streets pocked with crime and "carnage."

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

An inauguration protest in Washington, D.C., turned confrontational on Friday, as several hundred black-clad protesters broke windows and police responded with pepper spray and a concussive device.

The interim chief of the Metropolitan Police Department, Peter Newsham, said 217 protesters have been arrested, and 6 officers sustained minor injuries.

US Coast Guard Academy

Friday's presidential inaugural parade will include more than 8,000 participants. One of them is Master Chief Musician Jonathan Towne. He’s a member of the New London based U. S. Coast Guard Band. This will be the eighth inauguration he’s performed in -- and also his last. 

President-elect Donald Trump plans to hit the ground running. He could sign his first executive orders within hours of taking the oath of office.

"I've asked my transition team to develop a list of executive actions we can take on Day 1 to restore our laws and bring back our jobs," Trump said in a videotaped message in November. "It's about time."

Vice President-elect Mike Pence echoed that message in a meeting with reporters on Thursday.

"Our job is to be ready on Day 1," Pence said. "We are all ready to go to work."

The incoming president has promised to:

"The Oath." It sounds like the name of a book, and indeed, there have been many volumes with that name. But none more relevant this week than The Oath specified in the Constitution for the president of the United States when he takes office.

The 35 words in Article II, Section I, of the Constitution read as follows:

"I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States."

Michael Vadon / Creative Commons

The inauguration of Republican President-elect Donald Trump -- many will attend; some will boycott; will you be watching?

This hour, we preview the day's events with a team of reporters and political experts, and we want to hear from you. 

John H Gray / Creative Commons

Train travel in the Northeast might soon be faster, more accessible and more reliable, but a lot of this relies on the federal government.

This hour — rail in Connecticut. Is it on the right track?

Screenshot / White House

President Barack Obama gave his final press conference at the White House on Wednesday, less than 48 hours before Donald Trump is sworn in. The topics included his recent commutation of Chelsea Manning's prison sentence, immigration, and the role of the press.

Earlier this week, the U.S. Department of Defense announced it had transferred 10 more Guantanamo detainees, this time to Oman. Now, 45 remain at the facility, leaving challenges on what to do with the prisoners for President-elect Donald Trump.

President-elect Donald Trump's choice to head the Department of Health and Human Services defended stock transactions he made as a member of Congress as "above board," while vowing he would not pull the rug from under any American with health care as result of replacing the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Tom Price, a Republican from Georgia, faced the first of two hearings he'll have as the nominee for HHS secretary. Wednesday's was before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. It will not vote on Price's nomination; that's up to the Senate Finance Committee.

President Obama's final press conference was one of both reflection and subtle rebuke toward incoming President-elect Donald Trump, defending voting rights and a free press, all while reassuring the American people that "at my core, I think we're going to be OK."

Kaz Vorpal / Creative Commons

Inauguration Day is here. In a few short days, President Obama will transfer what remains of his power to Donald Trump. Some are elated, others afraid.

A local Republican lawmaker in Greenwich, Connecticut, has been arrested and has garnered national attention for an alleged sexual assault.

Christopher Von Keyserling was charged with fourth degree assault after police say he pinched a female town worker’s genitals during a political argument.

Von Keyserling and the worker were at a town building in December when Von Keyserling allegedly called the worker a lazy, bloodsucking union employee and said, “I love this new world. I no longer have to be politically correct.”

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