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President Trump skipped the annual Conservative Political Action Conference last year, but this year he was the annual gathering's hero who had finally returned the White House to Republicans.

Lori Mack/WNPR

Jewish community centers in Connecticut and across the country have been the target of phoned-in bomb threats. In response, U.S. Senator Chris Murphy and Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro met with members of the Jewish community in Woodbridge, where they’ve received two threats -- the most recent about two weeks ago. 

On the eve of the vote for the next chair of the Democratic National Committee, the crowded field is thinning out.

South Carolina Democratic Chair Jaime Harrison dropped out of the race Thursday and endorsed former Labor Secretary Tom Perez. The move comes days after another candidate, New Hampshire Democratic Chair Ray Buckley, exited the race and threw his support to Rep. Keith Ellison of Minnesota.

The Department of Homeland Security issued new guidelines this week that call for hiring 15,000 additional Border Patrol agents and immigration officers. It also wants to greatly expand the number of unauthorized immigrants who are prioritized for deportation.

LeStudio1 / Flickr

Melania Trump is in many ways a first: The first First Lady to have arrived as an immigrant, the first to have been born in a communist country, and the first to be the 3rd wife of a president. She is not the first, however, to show signs of reluctance towards embracing the role of FLOTUS.

The Trump administration is rescinding protections for transgender students in public schools.

The move by the Justice and Education departments reverses guidance the Obama administration publicized in May 2016, which said a federal law known as Title IX protects the right of transgender students to use restrooms and locker rooms that match their gender identities.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Many small towns in New England are eager to welcome refugees from the war in Syria, but that doesn’t seem likely under President Donald Trump’s shifting immigration policy.

St. Johnsbury Academy in Vermont has found a way around that -- they’re offering scholarships to refugees already living in the U.S.

Tracy O / Creative Commons

The fight over raising the minimum wage in Connecticut may be one of the issues that tests the new strength of Republicans in the General Assembly. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

More than 400 people attended a town hall in West Hartford on Tuesday with U.S. Senator Chris Murphy. Dozens spilled into overflow rooms when the auditorium reached capacity and hundreds of people were shut out when the fire marshal closed the building.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Welcome to the Wheelhouse -- WNPR’s Weekly News Roundtable -- as we celebrate our first week as “The Enemy of the American People!” 

It’s true that trust and confidence in the media has faltered over the years, as has confidence in every branch of government. But the “failing” New York Times, as President Trump calls the paper, has actually seen a gigantic surge in its readership.

David Wilson / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s cities and towns are calculating the potential cost of Governor Dannel Malloy’s budget proposal. The governor included major changes in the way the state disburses municipal aid, as well as shifting part of the cost of teachers’ pensions to towns. 

Group Helps Build Political Engagement in New England’s Muslim Community

Feb 21, 2017

Muslims in America are the subject of heated political debate. But they account for a very small number of elected politicians in New England.

One nonprofit, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is encouraging American-Muslims across the U.S. to run for political office. The group, called Jetpac, will train potential candidates regardless of party affiliation with the goal of increasing civic engagement within Muslim communities.

Updated 5:25 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is releasing more on its plans to crack down on illegal immigration, enforcing the executive orders President Trump issued in late January. Those orders called for increased border security and stricter enforcement of immigration laws.

The Department of Homeland Security issued the new rules on Tuesday, laid out in two documents signed by Secretary John Kelly.

Dannel Malloy / Creative Commons

Governor Malloy’s budget plan promises to aid struggling cities, but many towns are concerned about footing more of the bill.

This hour, we ask municipal leaders and lawmakers about Malloy’s budget proposal and we want to hear from you. 

The cellphone video is vivid. A Border Patrol agent aims his gun at an unarmed 15-year-old some 60 feet away, across the border with Mexico, and shoots him dead.

On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a case testing whether the family of the dead boy can sue the agent for damages in the U.S.

Between 2005 and 2013, there were 42 such cross-border shootings, a dramatic increase over earlier times.

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Many Americans were surprised by the results of the presidential election last month. During the early morning hours of November 9, half of America celebrated the ascension of the man (and not the first woman) that championed the needs of Americans who felt betrayed by those in power. The other half feared the election of a man with no experience in government and a stated desire to dismantle much of President Obama’s legacy.

Editor's note: This story contains language that may be offensive to some readers.

Harassment, threats and intimidation of minorities and immigrants spiked nationwide after President Trump's election in November. Comprehensive statistics are hard to come by, but officials and watch groups say hate-motivated incidents remain higher than usual more than three months after Election Day.

Massachusetts is among the many states that have seen such a spike.

The ACLU of Connecticut wants a study on how police in cities and towns across the state are implementing the use of body cameras.

Executive Director David McGuire testified before Connecticut lawmakers this week about a bill that would ask for a study on how that money is being spent. He said that $10 million was bonded in 2015 for the purchase of body cameras but that municipalities have yet to take advantage of it.

Ron Cogswell / Creative Commons

Want to know how the 12 U.S. Senators from New England are voting on President Donald Trump's nominees? Look no further.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Republicans in Congress are mulling an obscure rule change that could threaten Connecticut's newly established, state-sponsored retirement savings plan. 

Americans have complained for years about presidential campaigns that start too early and last too long.

Now, they are confronted with one that refuses to end — even after reaching the White House.

There may never be a "last word" written or spoken about President Trump's 77-minute barrage in the East Room Thursday, but the first word from many was: "Wow."

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police are reporting surges in illegal crossings in Canada in recent months. Officials say Quebec has seen the highest influx of people seeking asylum, with many crossing in remote, snowy areas west of Lake Champlain.

Jackie Harris / WNPR

State lawmakers held a public hearing Thursday on a series of bills to benefit workers in Connecticut. One effort would increase the minimum wage to $15.00 an hour by 2022, while another would mandate paid family leave. 

C-Span screenshot

President Donald Trump announced his new pick for labor secretary, after his initial choice withdrew from consideration earlier in the week. After his brief announcement, the president took questions for more than an hour from 17 reporters, discussing Russia, the media, immigration, and more.

Updated 9:05 p.m. ET with 9th Circuit appeals court delay

President Trump says his administration will continue to fight for his existing travel ban in the court system, and that he will also issue a new, "very comprehensive order" next week.

Trump provided no details on what that new order would entail, but said it would "comprehensively protect our country." The president made the remarks during a news conference Thursday at the White House.

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