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Politics

Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

President Trump wants to invite Russian President Vladimir Putin for a visit to Washington this autumn, the White House said on Thursday.

Press secretary Sarah Sanders said that Trump and Putin had agreed at their summit on Monday in Finland that their security staffs would have an "ongoing working-level dialogue" and as part of that, Trump told national security adviser John Bolton to invite Putin to the United States.

Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Following his one-on-one summit Monday with Russian leader Vladimir Putin in Helsinki, Finland, President Donald J. Trump provoked bipartisan scorn for seemingly placing more trust with the former KGB agent than his own foreign intelligence experts over the issue of Russian interference in U.S. elections.

But how much will those condemnations influence political races here in Connecticut?

Updated at 5:18 p.m. ET

A day after his much-criticized news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin, President Trump attempted some damage control Tuesday, saying "I accept" the findings of the U.S. intelligence community that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential campaign.

But he again repeated his claim that there was no collusion between his presidential campaign and Russia and suggested that others may have interfered in the election.

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Max Pixel

Public trust in the media is at historic lows. Today, Americans believe that the majority of news they encounter is biased, according to recent polling by Gallup.

This hour, guest host David DesRoches asks--why are journalists losing ground and what can they do to regain trust?

Trump Digs Coal, And GOP Candidates Skip Climate Forum

Jul 17, 2018
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

By skipping a forum on climate change Monday night, the five Republican candidates for governor saved themselves from two unpalatable options: Defending the Trump administration’s love affair with coal to furious environmentalists, or riling the GOP base a month before the primary by publicly breaking with the president.

Updated at 9:38 p.m. ET

The Justice Department charged 12 Russian intelligence officers on Friday with a litany of alleged offenses related to Russia's hacking of the Democratic National Committee's emails, state election systems and other targets in 2016.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who announced the indictments, said the Russians involved belonged to the military intelligence service GRU. They are accused of a sustained cyberattack against Democratic Party targets, including its campaign committee and Hillary Clinton's campaign.

In a debate in New Haven Thursday night, the two candidates contesting the Connecticut Democratic Party primary for governor sparred over who would best represent the Connecticut voter. The debate was sponsored by the Connecticut Association of Realtors.

GOP Gubernatorial Field Shows A More Combative Side

Jul 13, 2018
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

On a cabaret stage Thursday night, the five Republican candidates for governor shed the reticence that has blurred differences and personalities in the long slog to next month’s GOP primary, prodded by a radio talk-show host intent on producing 90 minutes of engaging programming.

Updated at 7:28 a.m. ET

President Trump, in a wide-ranging interview with The Sun, said British Prime Minister Theresa May ignored his advice on Brexit, a move he said threatens to scuttle a trade deal with the U.S.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio


Ned Lamont is a familiar name in Connecticut politics. The Greenwich businessman has run for the U.S. Senate and for governor. And now he’s trying again.

 

In May, Lamont easily won enough delegate votes to become the Democratic nominee for governor in 2018.  

 

This hour, we sit down with the candidate.

We ask about his decision to run, and about the issues facing the people and communities he hopes to lead.

Do you have a question or comment for Lamont? 

With the balance of the Supreme Court in question, some abortion-rights advocates are quietly preparing for a future they hope never to see — one without the protections of Roe v. Wade.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

A recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling struck a blow to public sector unions. But some union leaders say they’re hopeful the blowback may actually strengthen their organizations.

Protesters rallied outside the federal courthouse in New Haven against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.
Jesus Garzon / Connecticut Public Radio

Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court has received mixed reaction at his alma mater. Yale Law School released a statement Monday, with praise from current Yale professors and administrators.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Senators Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy wasted no time lambasting Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump's immediately controversial U.S. Supreme Court nominee.

Updated at 9:28 p.m. ET

President Trump has chosen Brett Kavanaugh to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. If confirmed, Trump's choice would solidify the high court's conservative majority and continue the president's push to shift the federal bench to the right.

Trump announced his choice with a prime-time address from the White House East Room.

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