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The Nose

Annapurna Productions, LLC

Mark Boal is a journalist who has written for Rolling Stone and Playboy and who partnered with Serial on the podcast's second season. Kathryn Bigelow is the director behind movies like Point Blank and Strange Days. As writer and director, Boal and Bigelow have collaborated on three films.

Netflix

Netflix has marketed its new series "Ozark" as " 'Breaking Bad' plus Jason Bateman," which might make you picture... a funnier version of "Breaking Bad"? "Ozark" is not a funnier version of "Breaking Bad." If anything, it's a bleaker version of "Breaking Bad." And maybe even a more bingeable version of "Breaking Bad"? The Nose might just have an answer to that question.

Warner Bros.

It's quite a trick Christopher Nolan has played on us over the course of a career that includes movies like Memento and Inception. His latest, Dunkirk, weaves together three storylines: One takes place on land over a week. One takes place on the sea over a day. And one takes place in the air over an hour. I walked out of the theater thinking, "That was a pretty straightforward narrative for a Christopher Nolan movie." The Nose has a lot to say about this new epic.

Lions Gate Entertainment Inc.

The Big Sick, written by Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani (who you know from "Silicon Valley"), tells the "awkward true story" of their courtship and stars Nanjiani as a version of himself. According to Rotten Tomatoes, the movie proves "the standard romcom formula still has some fresh angles left to explore." The Nose weighs in.

And then: What's with all the hating on Ed Sheeran? No, like: Really. The Nose doesn't get it.

Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.

Spider-Man: Homecoming is the sixth American Spider-Man feature film, and it's the 16th title in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. But it's the first movie that's both a Spider-Man feature and part of the MCU all at once. Is that a milestone worth noting? I'm not sure. I barely even understood what all that meant. The Nose weighs in.

Wilson Webb / Sony Pictures

Baby, played by Ansel Elgort, is a reluctant getaway driver in the latest Edgar Wright film, "Baby Driver." He's a good guy who's had some bad luck, like stealing the cash-filled car of a crime boss while coping with the death of his mom.

ABC Television Network

We live in a post-"The Gong Show" world. Any TV that you've ever heard anyone use the word "Dada" to describe -- David Letterman's entire career, for instance -- owes something to Chuck Barris's creation.

Colin McEnroe / WNPR

"What do festivals do?"

Whether it's a film festival or Edinburgh or the Venice Biennale or New Haven, we wonder what happens when you get a lot of creative stuff in one place.

Pete Birkinshaw / flickr creative commons

This week in pop culture: Delta and Bank of America decide Shakespeare is in poor taste. Megan Kelly decides Alex Jones is worthy of a platform. Senators John McCain and Richard Burr decide that Senator Kamala Harris shouldn't get to finish her sentences. And Bob Dylan decides to troll the Nobel committees.

Warner Bros. Entertainment/DC Comics

"Wonder Woman" isn't just the first big-budget, blockbuster movie about a female superhero (as if that isn't enough). It also had the biggest opening weekend for a movie directed by a woman (Patty Jenkins) in film history. Oh, and it's at 92 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, which puts it squarely in the territory of "The Dark Knight," "Iron Man," and "Spider-Man 2." Our all-woman (plus Colin) Nose went to see it.

Hartford Stage

The current production at Hartford Stage is a "grand, crisp and well-tailored yet ultimately unsettling" version of George Bernard Shaw's caustic comedy/drama, "Heartbreak House." The Nose went to see it and weighs in this hour.

Amazon

"I Love Dick" is Jill Soloway's second TV series for Amazon, after "Transparent." It's based on Chris Kraus's seminal feminist novel from the 1990s and stars Kevin Bacon as the titular character. Rolling Stone has called the show "the high-lit cowboy-lust TV show you need." The Nose weighs in.

Marvel

Look. I don't like Guardians of the Galaxy, okay? I get it. I'm the only nerd on the face of the planet who isn't charmed by these movies. I know I have a cold stone where my heart should be. I understand that I'm totally devoid of a soul. It's fine. I've come to terms with it. You still get to love these movies. The Nose still gets to love these movies. And The Nose does love these movies.

Hulu

Margaret Atwood started writing her classic dystopian novel The Handmaid's Tale in 1984. She set it in an imagined future America where the toxic environment has limited human fertility, a theocratic dictatorship has taken control, and women have been stripped of their rights. Atwood said the novel isn't a prediction, but the internet thinks Hulu's new TV version is.

Netflix

"13 Reasons Why" is the new Netflix series based on Jay Asher's book. In it, one of the main characters, a teenager, has killed herself before the narrative begins. As such, the show has been called, for one thing, "dangerous." The Nose weighs in.

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