non-profits

On Monday details of the budget deal that avoided a government shutdown Friday night were released.  Did it hurt or help Connecticut?

And Connecticut Congressman, John Larson, has teamed up with the oil tycoon T. Boone Pickens to introduce legislation this week that will push natural gas as a way of easing US dependence on oil.

Chion Wolf

Government Shutdown Looming, Again

Apr 8, 2011

With a Midnight deadline looming, President Obama and congressional leaders are scrambling to finish a budget for the rest of the year, and avoid a government shutdown. Connecticut's congressional delegation is scrambling as well, in case the government goes into shut down mode. The Connecticut Mirror's Washington correspondent Deirdre Shesgreen has been checking in with Connecticut lawmakers and joins us.

Read Deirdre Shesgreen's Article in the CT Mirror

Flickr Creative Commons, kennymatic

Luanne Rice has written 28 novels, many of them bestsellers, with translations into 24 languages and five TV adaptations.

She's a bi-coastal literary force, welcome in and familiar with the power corridors of New York publishing and the L.A. entertainment industry.

Chion Wolf

*This episode originally aired April 6, 2011*

We all know what it's like to slip into the gravitational pull of a musical artist. You might have a few weeks where you just can't stand to listen to to anything else. In fact, the musical universe seems divided up exactly that way - Your Guys. And Everybody Else.

Jeff Cohen/WNPR

Connecticut's nonprofit service providers are trying to figure out how to improve their working relationship with the state in order to save money and enhance services.  Advocates for the state's non-profits gathered today/yesterday at the state capitol to talk about a recently released report that looks to answer this question: "How can we as a government smooth the path so that the non-profits can actually provide the services without having to worry so much about the bureaucracy and the red tape." That's Deb Heinrich.

New Britain Busway

Apr 5, 2011

Governor Dannel Malloy has given his stamp of approval on construction of a New Britain to Hartford busway. The busway will travel along a 9.6 mile route of abandoned railroad bed, easing congestion on Interstate 84. Opponents and Supporters of the project met late last month with the Governor to offer their opinion on this controversial project.  One of those opponents is University of Connecticut Civil Engineering professor, Norman Garrick.

Yesterday, the general Assembly's Judiciary Committee heard public testimony on a host of bills aimed at better protecting victims of domestic violence. Joining us by phone is State Representative Mae Flexer - she is a member of the legislature's Judiciary committee and chairwoman of the Speaker’s Task Force on Domestic Violence.

Labor, After the Fire

Mar 28, 2011
Library of Congress

On Friday’s show Governor Dannel Malloy took a hard line with state labor unions – if they don’t reach an agreement on concessions, massive layoffs are on the table.

Governor Malloy said about the possibility of layoffs: “If it’s the only option, it’s the only option to pursue.” Today we’ll get reaction from an official from the state’s employee unions.

Chion Wolf

Dannel Malloy said he’d be more open to the press – more “communicative” than the previous governor.  I guess he wasn’t kidding…

Since his budget speech, Malloy has embarked on a voyage through Connecticut towns and cities that would seem ambitious by the standards of a touring rock band. 

And like those bands, grinding it out on the road – it must be getting a bit old by now. 

StemConn 2011

Mar 24, 2011

Stem cells hold the promise of treating a host of diseases in the future. Today in Farmington, some of the top Stem Cell researchers in the country gathered to share the latest discoveries in this new technology.

Every two years, Connecticut hosts StemConn, a full day symposium that looks at the latest research and trends in this promising technology. Stem cells have the ability to regenerate and replenish various tissue in the body, which could potentially treat diseases such as cancer, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis.

Flickr Creative Commons, Don Hankins

Here, to me, are the killer statistics:

Elizabeth Taylor has died. But the moviegoing experience she embodied died long before her. 

Flickr Creative Commons, Hampton Roads Partnership

On today's show we're going to look at the elaborate networks -- pipeline is too straight and straightforward a word -- that exist in Connecticut to nurture new businesses -- which came to be called, in the last two decades -- "start ups."

Flickr Creative Commons, emilianohorcada

The idea that music can be medicine may strike some of you as woo-woo new age piffle. To a degree I had not understood until now, serious researchers all over the world as studying these connections and making astonishing breakthroughs.

Paul J. Everett, Creative Commons

As the world watches the nuclear crisis unfolding in Japan, Federal lawmakers, including Connecticut's Washington delegation are rethinking nuclear power.  We talk to the Connecticut Mirror's Washington correspondent Deirdre Shesgreen.  So what are Connecticut lawmakers saying?

Creative Commons

Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and New Jersey are all talking about taxes and public sector unions.

It’s a different kind of conversation in the Northeast than they’re having in say, Wisconsin - but the rhetoric is still kind of hot.

Dannel Malloy dubbed himself the “Anti-Christie” (take that New Jersey!) and then got a nice write-up in the New York Times for what they called a “Better Budget” proposal without bombast.

DMahendra, Creative Commons

Today, Long Island Congressman, Peter King, holds a hearing called "The Extent of Radicalization in the American Muslim Community and that Community's Response."

As chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security, King says he wants to look into the threat of homegrown terrorism and its ties to Islam.

Casey Serin

On the day Illinois is expected to abolish the death  penalty, Connecticut lawmakers are grappling with the same question.

Democrats in this state who want to repeal the law allowing executions feel this is their year - with a Governor who says he’ll sign a “prospective” law.  But many people from both parties want to keep the punishment as a tool for prosecutors.

Flickr Creative Commons, stevendepolo

We can put a man on the moon. Why can't we make our roads look less like the moon?

Mills Baker, Creative Commons

More than 336,000 residents of Connecticut use food stamps – up over 30% in the past year. 

This program, now known as SNAP - Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs – provides an average of $263 a month for each household on the program. 

Dodd Takes Hollywood

Mar 3, 2011
Chion Wolf, WNPR

Earlier this week, retired US Senator, Chris Dodd, came out of his 8 week retirement.  We talk to the Connecticut Mirror's Deirdre Shesgreen about Dodd's new gig.

FrankJuarez / Creative Commons

Leadership in school districts is more important than ever before – as schools struggle to fulfill local educational needs, while paying close attention to edicts from the federal government.  

Then, of course, there’s the job of finding the money to do it all…while dealing with politics, parents and issues of student achievement which may not all be under your control. 

Today, where we live, we’ll look at the job of superintendent, and ask what it takes to find the right leader in the schools to run your “race to the top.”

Flickr Creative Commons, Tim Green aka atoach

A recent round of questions about conflicts of interest in the U.S. Supreme Court may place all three branches of government on a collision course.

Emerging Adults

Feb 28, 2011
archie4oz, creative commons

Step aside “quarter life crisis” -  there’s a new term for 20-somethings in that transition phase of their lives.  He calls it “emerging adulthood”

Dr. Jeffrey Arnett claims that in the past half century, the experience of people aged 18 to 29 has changed dramatically - at least in some societies.

Most young people now postpone marriage and parenthood until at least their late twenties, and spend their late teens through their mid-20s in self-focused exploration, trying out different possibilities in love and work.

Flickr Creative Commons, Sam Howzit

Until recently, I didn't understand the degree to which Connecticut jury selection process -- called the voir dire -- differs from those of other states.

Gun Control

Feb 22, 2011
westside shooter / Creative Commons

It’s been a little more than a month since the shooting of a congresswoman made the nation stop and really think about how it talks about guns.  Well, that didn’t last long.

Here’s a case in point:  When New Haven Mayor John DeStefano announced that he's laying off some city employees, including police, it prompted protests by officers. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Hartford board of education is scheduled to meet Tuesday to pick a successor to Superintendent Steven Adamowski, who is leaving after this year.  But there's some concern in the community that the process was flawed.  The district’s spokesman has been advocating for one of the two candidates to take Adamowski’s place.

You might know the name Elizabeth Horton Sheff.  She's the Sheff in Sheff vs. O'Neill, the landmark school desegregation case in Hartford.

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