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French police have taken an 18-year-old suspect identified as Mourad Hamyd into custody after he surrendered to authorities, according to multiple French news outlets. Hamyd had been sought in relation to a murderous attack on a satirical magazine's Paris office Wednesday, but it's not certain whether he was involved.

This much is certain: Charlie Hebdo will live another day.

The magazine, which was the target of a deadly attack Wednesday, will be kept going through financial and editorial backing from some of France's largest media groups.

Updated at 10 p.m. ET.

At least 12 people were killed during a shooting at the headquarters of the satirical Charlie Hebdo weekly in Paris, police say. Two key suspects remain at large (see our latest post for updates).

Charlie Hebdo, the satirical French magazine that was the target of a deadly attack today, is part of a long tradition of French satire dating to the days before the French Revolution.

The left-wing magazine is known for its biting takedowns. Its past targets include the political right wing, capitalism, Christianity, Judaism and Islam.

The worst fate of all may be to make a terrible mistake and then learn the wrong lessons from the experience.

That's the thought I had reading a heartfelt column about the Boston Herald's unfortunate decision to publish a cartoon featuring a White House gate-crasher asking the nation's first black president if he had "tried the new watermelon flavored toothpaste."

Ending decades of family leadership, Washington Post owner Jeffrey Bezos announced on Tuesday that Frederick J. Ryan Jr. would be taking over as publisher of the venerable journalism institution.

Ryan, a former Reagan administration official and founding member of the website Politico, will take over for Katharine Weymouth.

The Post reports:

katsrcool / Creative Commons

after a line from Haruki Murakami

Dean Baquet sat in his new office in Midtown Manhattan, the very picture of composure and precision, as he described the top-level dysfunction that led to the firing of Jill Abramson as executive editor of The New York Times and his promotion to replace her as the top news executive there.

WNYC

Bob Garfield, host of WNYC's On The Media, kicks off this edition of The Scramble. Something tells us The New York Times' Jill Abramson saga isn't over...

Chion Wolf / WNPR

You'd think that the New York Times, after covering so many sackings, would know how to fire its own editor without having it become one of the biggest, ugliest stories of the week. On today's show, we'll explore the presumption that the Great Gray Lady is run by sexist pork faces.

This story was updated at 6:30 p.m. ET.

The New York Times is replacing Executive Editor Jill Abramson with Dean Baquet, the paper's managing editor.

Abramson, who took the top spot at the newspaper in 2011, was the first woman to hold that job.

Jon S / Creative Commons

Some of the state's municipal leaders have pushed for a change in state law that would allow them to save money and cut back on printed public notices. But it seems unlikely that lawmakers will pass a measure before the session ends on Wednesday. 

David Shankbone / Wikimedia Commons

This hour on The Scramble our superguest is David Folkenflik. I don't have to tell you who David Folkenflik is, do I? I mean, you're public radio listeners. The superguest always sets the agenda, and David wants to talk about new journalism start-ups like Vox, Five-Thirty Eight, First Look,  and about what middle-aged digital brand names like Slate are doing to survive. 

Jon S / Creative Commons

The state's daily newspapers, and its towns and cities, remain divided over how to change the state’s laws on printed legal notices.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

As newspaper advertising revenue continues its slump across the country, publishers are trying to hold on to one line of stable cash: the printed legal notice. In Connecticut, municipal leaders are pushing for a change in state law that would allow them to save money and cut back on those notices. And newspapers are pushing back. 

NS Newsflash / Creative Commons

For centuries, Connecticut has housed one of American journalism’s greatest gems: The Hartford Courant. In 1764, a New Haven printer by the name of Thomas Green founded the capital-based newspaper. Since then, The Courant has evolved into an established and highly revered news enterprise, circulating well over 100,000 copies to readers each day.

Now, thanks to years of professional writing and reporting, The Courant is celebrating its 250th year of publication, thus maintaining its status as the nation’s oldest continuously-running newspaper. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show is featuring an episode on grammar next Tuesday. 

Below we have a "fatal" example of a misplaced modifier. I'm fairly certain the judge didn't do any of those horrible things. (h/t R.R. Cooper)

Jon S / Creative Commons

The Connecticut Conference of Municipalities has released its list of legislative priorities for the year. One of them would allow towns and cities to publish full public notices online, and not in newspapers. The move could save public money, but it is opposed by the state's newspapers.

NS Newsflash / Creative Commons

For centuries, Connecticut has housed one of American journalism’s greatest gems: The Hartford Courant. In 1764, a New Haven printer by the name of Thomas Green founded the capital-based newspaper. Since then, The Courant has evolved into an established and highly revered news enterprise, circulating well over 100,000 copies to readers each day.

Now, thanks to years of professional writing and reporting, The Courant is celebrating its 250th year of publication, thus maintaining its status as the nation’s oldest continuously-running newspaper. 

Adam Jones, Ph.D. / Wikimedia Commons

Along the lines of Project Longevity, a violence-prevention initiative that launched in New Haven in the past year, Chicago is trying something different to identify trouble and maybe even get out in front of it. That and more in today's Wheelhouse Digest, including Colin McEnroe's tribute to the late, much-beloved, "titanic figure" Irving Kravsow.

Tucker Ives / WNPR

Targets for "expense reductions" have not been set, but The Hartford Courant's parent company, Tribune, confirmed that it has asked newspaper managers to look for areas they could cut back. According to a report by The Los Angeles Times, there will be staff reductions but they have not determined how many jobs will be affected.

The art world in northwestern Connecticut was rocked last week when a longtime assistant to artist Jasper Johns was arrested for stealing 22 works from Johns and selling them for $6.5 million. The NY Times reports on the case against James Meyer.

Responding to speculation that his newspaper would be next, New York Times Publisher and Chairman Arthur Sulzberger Jr. has issued a flat "the Times is not for sale" statement.

Donald Graham, chairman of The Washington Post Co., is the son and grandson of its leaders for the past 80 years. And along with his niece, publisher Katharine Weymouth, Graham admitted in a video on The Post's website that the family simply didn't have the answers to questions about the paper's future.

The news spread with the speed of the Internet: The Washington Post, a newspaper that helped bring down a president, would be sold to Jeff Bezos, the tech titan who started Amazon.

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