New York

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Syracuse University has "uninvited" a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer to a journalism workshop because he had covered the Ebola crisis in Liberia. 

Findings from a new long-term study of small high schools in New York City show the approach may not only boost a student's chances of enrolling in college but also cost less per graduate.

The city began an intensive push to create smaller learning communities in its high schools in 2002. That year, the city's education department rolled out a districtwide lottery system for high school admission.

For most of New York, Rikers Island is out of sight and out of mind. It's in the middle of the East River between Queens and the Bronx. There's only one unmarked bridge that leads on and off. But a recent report on violence by correction officers, or COs, was no surprise to those who've spent time there.

NYC Council Considers Car Ban For Central Park

Oct 9, 2014

New York City’s Central Park may soon be free of cars.

New York state officials, including Governor Andrew Cuomo, welcomed the one of the world’s largest floating cranes to the construction site of the replacement Tappan Zee Bridge Monday. At the same time, the governor’s opponent in the November election called for details on the new bridge’s expected tolls. 

Manhattan's Central Park is surrounded by one of the densest cities on the planet. It's green enough, yet hardly the first place most people would think of as biologically rich.

But a team of scientists got a big surprise when they recently started digging there.

They were 10 soil ecologists — aka dirt doctors. Kelly Ramirez from Colorado State University was among them. "We met on the steps of the natural history museum at 7 a.m. with our collection gear, coolers and sunblock," she recalls.

Mayor Bill de Blasio signed an executive order Tuesday that effectively raises the hourly wage for thousands of workers in New York City. The city says its expansion of the Living Wage provisions will boost yearly earnings for the lowest-paid workers from $16,640 to $27,310.

From New York, NPR's Joel Rose reports:

Rochester, N.Y., was once the imaging capital of the world, home to Kodak, Xerox and the eye care company, Bausch + Lomb.

Led by these companies, the manufacturing sector once employed 60 percent of Rochester's workforce. Now, that's less than 10 percent. And so, like many cities in this country, Rochester is trying to build something new from its manufacturing heritage.

If you want to understand the story of Rochester, says historian Carolyn Vacca, you need to come to High Falls, where from a bridge visitors see a waterfall and a panoramic view of downtown.

Tomorrow in Central Park, Jay-Z will rap, Sting will sing and India's prime minister, Narendra Modi, will talk about the need to end open defecation — that's what they call it when people don't have access to toilets, and it's a huge global problem.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio held a press conference this afternoon to tamp down comments made by Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi.

De Blasio said American authorities had found no "specific, credible threat" against the New York City subway system.

Earlier today, al-Abadi caused concern when he said his government had uncovered a plot targeting the mass transit system. The Chicago Tribune adds:

Three days of public hearings on casinos planned for upstate New York began today in Albany County.

Streets in New York City and other towns were taken over by marchers Sunday in what organizers called the largest climate change protest in history. The People's Climate March was timed to draw the notice of world leaders gathering for this week's U.N. Climate Summit.

peoplesclimate.org

Connecticut is expected to be well-represented at Sunday's People's Climate March in New York City.

The Wall Street Journal offices on Liberty Street were evacuated after the first plane hit, though none of us knew then that a plane had hit. We joined a small crowd on the sidewalk and squinted up at the smoking building. I remember the second plane flying right over our heads, though this may be inaccurate. But the impact I'm sure of, and the debris, and a stranger shielding my body with his. We saw people jump with an awful grace, but we did not linger. Lucky not to get caught, lucky not to lose someone.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo won the Democratic primary for governor, but not without an unexpectedly strong challenge from law school professor Zephyr Teachout, who spent virtually no money and had a bare-bones campaign operation.

Cuomo barely cleared 60 percent of the vote Tuesday, and though he won his home county of Westchester, the governor lost nearly the entire Hudson Valley.

Even before returns were in, Cuomo downplayed expectations, saying that primaries were unpredictable and that he would be happy with anything "over 50 percent."

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has defeated liberal challenger Zephyr Teachout in the state's Democratic primary, turning back an energetic longshot bid by liberals who have criticized his pragmatic, centrist approach.

In the power business, it's all about managing the peaks.

During the hottest days of summer, electric utilities run at full capacity to keep giant cities comfortably cool. But most of the rest of the year, half that capacity goes unused — and that's highly inefficient.

On Monday, the four Capital Region casino applicants appeared in Albany to present their proposals to the New York State Gaming Facility Location Board.

With gamblers seemingly preferring to visit smaller casinos closer to home, the presentations four developers delivered before the New York State Gaming Commission’s location siting board offered practical mid-size packages.    "We are committed to developing the best site there is in a way that best serves this community, its citizens and its economic goals"

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Mathew Martoma, a former portfolio manager with Stamford-based SAC Capital Advisors, has been sentenced in New York to nine years in prison. He was convicted earlier this year of helping the firm earn more than $250 million illegally through insider trading.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo was supposed to cruise past next Tuesday's primary election in New York on his way to a second term.

But the powerful Democratic incumbent may have more trouble than many expected. For one thing, his main opponent, a little-known law professor named Zephyr Teachout, is mounting a respectable challenge from the left. For another, Cuomo could potentially wind up with a running mate he doesn't want.

This week, the local cable news channel NY1 tried to host a debate between Cuomo and Teachout. Teachout was the only one to show up.

As established casinos across the Northeast close their doors or administer cost-cutting measures, New York is just getting into the game.  And although it won’t host a casino if its own, Albany has become a key player.

The mantra has been "jobs and the economy," and New York's capital is crossing its fingers, hoping for a windfall should a casino go up in nearby Rensselaer County.

On a hot, humid afternoon, Bob Stewart has called a rehearsal at his Harlem apartment. Six musicians are in a circle in the living room — on one side, trumpet and trombone; on the other, cello, viola and violin; and in the middle, the elephant in the room — Stewart's tuba.

Mocha Hookah is a little Middle Eastern restaurant and cafe on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn where you can pick up a shawarma gyro sandwich and a falafel platter and still get change back from your $20 bill. Walk inside and there's Arabic music, soccer games on flat screen televisions, and a hookah, or water pipe, set up at every table.

For many immigrants arriving in the U.S., opening a family food business can be a pathway to economic stability. While many fail, one Dominican woman in the Bronx has managed to get her family off food stamps, send her kids to college and share her heritage with new friends and neighbors. And it all started with cake.

Not just any cake — but bizcocho Dominicano, flavored with rum and vanilla extract, and layered with tropical fruit spreads and meringue.

Casino developers have upped the ante in a bid to secure support from the city of Albany.

The only statewide candidate who is participating in a pilot public campaign finance program in New York says it’s been slow going, but Republican candidate for comptroller Bob Antonacci expects to collect enough individual donors to qualify for the state matching funds.

Crime fiction writer Lawrence Block lives in New York's West Village, in a stately art deco building overlooking Abingdon Square. He bought an apartment there decades before actress Jennifer Aniston did. (She sold hers shortly thereafter.) Block is 76, silver-haired and keen-eyed; and in his pastel shirt and khakis, he looks decidedly more Hamptons than downtown.

The Department of Defense confirmed the death of Major General Harold Greene, killed yesterday in Kabul after an apparent member of the Afghan security forces turned on him. Major General Green was born in Albany and is a graduate of RPI. He was commissioned in 1980 after graduation. He served as an Army engineer and rose to the rank of two-star general. An investigation into the circumstances surrounding his death will be undertaken. His remains will be sent back to the United States, although the timing of that flight is still undetermined. 

Eric Garner, the unarmed man who died two weeks ago after police placed him in a chokehold, was a victim of homicide, says New York City's Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. Garner's death was captured in a video that showed his confrontation with police on a Staten Island sidewalk.

The update on Garner's controversial death was announced Friday afternoon. Member station WNYC cites spokeswoman Julie Bolcer:

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