Davis Dunavin / WSHU

There are questions that might stump even the most dedicated country music fan: Who kickstarted the country music industry in the 1920s, even before big names like Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family? And why is this Texas musician buried in Bridgeport, Connecticut?

His name was Vernon Dalhart, and he released some of the best-selling records of the era, including “The Prisoner’s Song.”

Eric Murray

Even as a toddler, Christian Sands, the onetime wunderkind who grew up in New Haven, could play the piano well enough to turn sophisticated listeners’ heads.

By age 4, he had taken his first baby steps into “formal” studies, which prepared him for writing compositions by 5.


These days, just about everybody in the classical music world has an idea about how to enliven the concert experience.

Stephen Hough, the brilliant British-born pianist and composer, has just put forward what might be the single most effective one, not to mention unquestionably the least expensive: Make concerts shorter, already.

New Haven Celebrates Its Italian Culture

Aug 18, 2016
Patricia Lewis/flickr creative commons

In the late 1800s, Italian immigrants moved into the Wooster Street area of New Haven, bringing with them the flavors and music of their homeland. This weekend, the city celebrates its Italian culture with a new event called Opera-Palooza

Diane Sobolewski

Petula Clark has been singing since 1942, when as a nine-year-old child, she answered a request from a BBC producer to sing to a British theater audience unnerved by an air raid that delayed the BBC broadcast they came to hear.

Samirah Evans

A powerhouse jazz and blues artist who was uprooted by Hurricane Katrina from New Orleans to Brattleboro, Vermont, Samirah Evans is an unstoppable force of nature on-stage, a sexy, high-octane blend of ebullient personality and explosive showbiz savvy.

Before the noted, jazz-loving Berkshire watercolorist Marguerite Bride had pledged her troth to art in the 1990s, the Pittsfield painter had worked as a dedicated registered nurse and a highly regarded software engineering manager with a degree in computer science.

Stuart Chalmers / flickr creative commons

Colin's out today. He got vocal nodes while moonlighting as Mariah Carey’s backup singer, and he's seeing his otolaryngologist. Or he sprained an ankle during a performance with The Rockettes, and now he's in traction.

Steven Sussman

Few, if any, sane gamblers back in 1996 would have bet that the Litchfield Jazz Festival (LJF) -- a then at-risk brainchild of the fearless cultural crusader Vita Muir -- would survive its infancy to become an annual crown jewel among Connecticut’s premier summer arts and entertainment events.

Andrew Eccles / Emerson String Quartet

I know a lot of you around here recall watching with admiration and amazement the steady rise of the Emerson String Quartet, as they moved from complete unknowns to a place at the very pinnacle of the string quartet world.

Leyla Kayi

A robust celebration of urban life and culture, the Springfield Jazz and Roots Festival -- a free, day-long, outdoor gala reveling in global sounds, arts, crafts, dance, theater and local and ethnic cuisine -- steps off Saturday, August 6, at 11:00 am at Court Square in the heart of the city’s downtown.

ABC Television / Creative Commons

The 2016 Gershwin Prize for Popular Song will go to William “Smokey” Robinson.

About time.

Jan Mullen

Living for decades in the shadow of his famous, beloved big brother, Nat “King” Cole, Freddy Cole didn’t begin to emerge as a fine singer and pianist in his own right until the 1990s, when he was already in his 60s.

E. Bieber / Creative Commons

Earlier this week, it was reported that the autograph manuscript of Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 (“Resurrection”) will be auctioned at Sotheby’s this fall.

Irene Cowern

Traditional jazz fans can double their pleasure as the identical twin Midiri brothers, Joe and Paul, coast-to-coast co-champions of classic jazz, display their parallel musical wizardry at the Elks Lodge in Branford on July 15 at 7:30 pm.

David DesRoches / WNPR

In the summer of 1877 there was a battle in the mountains of Montana. The Nez Perce people fought the U.S. Army over two days. Dozens of women and children were killed, along with U.S. and Nez Perce fighters. 

Richard Conde

Unlike some piano virtuosos, Laszlo Gardony, Hungary’s great gift to the American jazz scene, uses his dazzling keyboard mastery to enhance his soulful expressiveness rather than relying on pyrotechnical prowess as his sole claim to international fame.

Dc 160 / Wikimedia

After a six-month national search, The Hartt School has a new dean.

Maurice Robertson

Break out the cooler, corkscrew, suntan lotion, shades, lawn chair and picnic basket for the grand July opening of the free, lavish summer jazz festivities in Hartford’s Bushnell Park.


Singer-songwriter Melissa Etheridge responded to the mass shooting at a Florida nightclub by doing one thing she felt she could do, which was write a song. Her debut performance of it in Torrington went viral on Facebook and was shared over 25,000 times. 

Hilary Scott

Just to get this out of the way, I have no problem calling Brian Wilson a genius.

Over the years, some of my classical music friends have clucked at my willingness to grant this designation to the man who brought us “Fun, Fun, Fun” and “Surfer Girl” and “Little Deuce Coupe.

Steven Sussman

Summer is the most remarkably abundant season for premier local jazz festivals, stomping everywhere from downtown Springfield to the New Haven Green, from Litchfield County’s Goshen Fairgrounds to Hartford’s Bushnell Park.

Earlier this year at the Golden Globes, the top TV honor, Best Television Series -- Drama, went to USA's hacker technothriller series "Mr. Robot." Last year, the trophy went to Showtime's "The Affair."

Between those two new shows, there are three point-of-view characters, three narrators. And you can’t really trust, you can't fully believe a one of them.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Sunday is Juneteenth, a day to commemorate the end of slavery in the United States. This hour, we reflect on this history and legacy of slavery with Alika Hope and The Ray of Hope Project. We hear music and talk with members of the group who are performing at Old Sturbridge Village in Massachusetts.

Thomas Breitkopf / Creative Commons

Flash: The musical is back.