mental health

Tony Alter / Creative Commons

People with eating disorders like obesity could be getting treatment from a therapist with their own inherent weight bias, that's according to a new study from the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity.

The survey of 329 mental health specialists revealed that while almost all of them agreed it's important to treat obese patients with compassion and respect, they admitted that many of their colleagues have negative biases about their obese patients. 56 percent said they heard or witnessed other professionals making negative comments and fat jokes about obese patients in their care.

Suicide Haunts New Generation Of Veterans

Aug 1, 2013

It’s estimated that more than 20 veterans kill themselves every day. A new survey of men and women who served in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan shows that mental health is the most important issue they face.

New state legislation may soon be considered to address enforcement gaps in existing federal regulations related to mental health coverage.

Homer Bell was 54 years old when he killed himself in April in a very public way — he laid down his head in front of a stopped bus in his hometown of Hartford, Conn. It was the last act in a life filled with struggle, as Bell and his family endured his schizophrenia.

At a time when there are calls to strengthen the mental health system, Bell's story shows how hard coping with mental illness can be.

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An amendment to the defense budget bill before Congress could help military families who have children with developmental disabilities including autism.

Love 2.0

May 30, 2013
Camdiluv ♥/flickr creative commons

Tony Bacewicz/C-HIT

Ten-year-old Joey Smith shared a celebratory high-five with Heather Kunkel, a mental health professional who was visiting the boy’s Thomaston home. “Things are great, spectacular even,” he said, as the two chatted at the kitchen table.

It’s a dramatic turnaround for Joey who met Kunkel when she was summoned to Thomaston Center School because he had threatened to harm himself. Now Joey, who has autism, is back at school with a modified curriculum to suit his individual needs and his parents have access to an educational advocate and community resources.

Tony Bacewicz/C-HIT

Ten-year-old Joey Smith shared a celebratory high-five with Heather Kunkel, a mental health professional who was visiting the boy’s Thomaston home. “Things are great, spectacular even,” he said, as the two chatted at the kitchen table.

It’s a dramatic turnaround for Joey who met Kunkel when she was summoned to Thomaston Center School because he had threatened to harm himself. Now Joey, who has autism, is back at school with a modified curriculum to suit his individual needs and his parents have access to an educational advocate and community resources.

Flickr Creative Commons

Marco Arment (Flickr Creative Commons)

The University of Connecticut has come out with a new study on violent video games. It looked specifically at whether video games that pit players against human looking characters provokes more violent thoughts in the player than fighting non-human creatures.

When players fight human looking characters, "they're later more verbally aggressive and they have more aggressive thoughts," said Kirstie Farrar, who is an associate professor of communication and lead researcher of the study.

Chion Wolf

Suicide rates have risen dramatically for middle-aged Americans in the last 10 years. The highest jump is for men aged 50-54. In a report released last week, the CDC says that more people aged 35-64 die from suicide than from car accidents, and they have been since 2009.

This hour, we look at what might be behind this trend, and what resources are available for Connecticut residents struggling with mental health issues.

JoePenna, creative commons

Advocates for mental health have been expressing concern about the conversation in American following the Newtown shootings.  While we still don’t know the details of whatever mental illness Adam Lanza may have suffered from, and we don’t know the particulars of his treatment or medication, lawmakers from all sides of the debate over guns have drawn mental health care into the discussion.  

Photo courtesy of Flickr CC by Adkp

Waterbury police are collaborating with mental health professionals in a pilot program that aims to reduce traumatic stress in children.  As WNPRs Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the program is meant to provide support to children after the arrest of a parent or caregiver.

Photo courtesy of Flickr CC by Adkp

Waterbury police are collaborating with mental health professionals in a pilot program that aims to reduce traumatic stress in children.  The program is meant to provide support to children after the arrest of a parent or caregiver.

frostnova/flickr creative commons

State lawmakers have reached a deal on what they're calling some of the toughest gun laws in the country.   As WNPR's Jeff Cohen  reports, the announcement is the product of weeks of bipartisan talks after the Newtown shootings. If it passes, the bill would mean universal background checks for the sale of all firearms.  It would also tighten the state's existing ban on assault weapons, require a background check to buy ammunition, and ban the sale of magazines that hold more than 10 bullets. Democrat Don Williams is the state senate president. "In Connecticut, we've broken the mold.

State lawmakers have reached a deal on what they're calling some of the toughest gun laws in the country.   The announcement is the product of weeks of bipartisan talks after the Newtown shootings.

If it passes, the bill would mean universal background checks for the sale of all firearms.  It would also tighten the state's existing ban on assault weapons, require a background check to buy ammunition, and ban the sale of magazines that hold more than 10 bullets.

Democrat Don Williams is the state senate president.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Regaining Balance

Mar 28, 2013
Ethan Sherbondy/flickr creative commons

Everybody gets knocked off course. How do you rebalance in an unpredictable world? Bruce Clements joins Faith to talk about the art of restoring balance. Are there go-to tactics that work for most people? Or is the answer different depending on what happens to you? What can we learn from others? How do you get perspective when the clear mind you need is clouded and confused?

Regaining Balance

Mar 28, 2013
Ethan Sherbondy/flickr creative commons

Everybody gets knocked off course. How do you re-balance in an unpredictable world? Bruce Clements joins Faith to talk about the art of restoring balance. Are there go-to tactics that work for most people? Or is the answer different depending on what happens to you? What can we learn from others? How do you get perspective when the clear mind you need is clouded and confused?

Connecticut's National Guard Forced To Adapt For War

Mar 19, 2013

From colonial militias to combat reserve, the role of the National Guard has varied in more than 376 years. It shifted again after the attacks on 9-11. Appearing on WNPR's Where We Live, Colonel John Whitford of the Connecticut National Guard says people enlisted for different reasons over the last 13 years. "You've seen the guard change from a strategic force to an operational force. That's when you've seen many Connecticut National Guard army and air units going to Iraq to provide that assistance to the combatant commander."

Wieritz on Flickr Creative Commons

Today Faith tackles meditation and its affects on psychotherapy. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil

Every day an estimated twenty-two veterans kill themselves in the U.S. and most of them will use a gun to do so according to the US Department of Veterans Affairs. This trend mirrors the general population where more people kill themselves with guns than with all other methods combined. The VA is trying to help with a program that offers gun locks to veterans for free. The thinking is that if they lock their guns up they might not reach for them in the spur of the moment. 

Saroj Regmi/flickr creative commons

Police Set New Ways To Deal With Trauma After Newtown

Feb 25, 2013

The shooting deaths of 20 children and six adults in Newtown have forced law enforcement officials in Connecticut to come up with new procedures to help police. The measures could change the way law enforcement responds to life-changing trauma.

Digitalbob8 on Flickr Creative Common

Dr. Amy Arnsten, Professor of Neurobiology and Psychology at Yale University, spoke to WNPR's Ray Hardman, on her recently released findings from a study exposing the importance of healthy NMDA receptors needed for higher-level thinking and their potential link to illnesses like schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease when this pre-frontal cortical circuitry is damaged.

Cindy Papish Gerber

This time we’ll be talking about “Grief and Loss”, an issue we’ve been struggling with since the unthinkable violence in Newtown on December 14th. As you’ll hear in the podcast, grief and loss comes in many different forms - everything from the the sudden death of a spouse or a child to the loss of a job, a pet, a relationship... or sometimes even “all of the above”.

Why Worry?

Feb 13, 2013
Jonathan McNicol

Courtesy of Clifford Beers Clinic

A New Haven mental health clinic has received a federal grant to help the children of military families. The clinic aims to use the funding to fill a gap that exists in the VA health care system.

Lawmakers are hearing/heard testimony on mental health services in the state, as part of the legislature's response to the shootings at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown.  WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports. Patricia Rehmer had a note of caution for lawmakers.  She's the state's commissioner of Mental Health and Addition Services. "We do not have any information about the mental health or any mental health issues that the shooter in the Newtown tragedy may have.

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