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A genetic test that helps doctors determine how best to treat breast cancer -- and whether chemotherapy is likely to help -- is significantly more likely to be administered to white women than blacks or Hispanics, a Yale study has found.

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According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), roughly one in five adults in the U.S. experiences a mental illness each year -- that’s approximately 20 percent of all American adults. But even as awareness increases, the stigma associated with mental illness persists.

As a neonatal intensive care nurse, Lauren Bloomstein had been taking care of other people's babies for years. Finally, at 33, she was expecting one of her own. The prospect of becoming a mother made her giddy, her husband, Larry, recalled recently— "the happiest and most alive I'd ever seen her."

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In the 1800s, Connecticut peddlers would travel south to peddle goods made in small factories around the state. The best way to increase their profit margin was to slip a few pieces of prized nutmeg -- and a few fake wooden ones to match -- in their bag. It didn't take long to expose the fraud, earning us the nickname of the Nutmeg State, known by all as clever, if ethically challenged, people. 

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Life after death, in one form or another,  has been examined by multiple disciplines for centuries: From theology, to physics, to philosophy, to medicine and more. But while the topic is taken seriously by some, it remains a focus of ridicule and skepticism by others.

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Sleep. We all need it. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly one in three U.S. adults does not get enough of it.

Coming up, we consider the impact of this and other sleep-related trends with Dr. Meir Kryger. His new book is called The Mystery of Sleep.

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President Donald Trump's nominee to head the Food and Drug Administration was before Congress this week. Scott Gottlieb wants a quicker approval process for new drugs, but a new study said the FDA already works faster than its peer agency in Europe.

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An estimated 95,000 young children in Connecticut under age six have experienced a potentially traumatic event. There's a new effort underway in the state to expand services focused on their developmental needs.

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Acceptance for medical marijuana is growing among people who swear by marijuana's power to relieve their ills. Older people are choosing marijuana for their aches and pains, parents are moving to states where marijuana is legal for children with seizure disorders, even pet owners are using pot to ease their pup's pain.  It's currently legal in 28 states with several more on deck.

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State Rep. Vincent Candelora proposed legislation that would impose a six percent tax on medical marijuana.

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Connecticut Senators Chris Murphy and Richard Blumenthal are co-sponsors of new legislation to help combat opioid addiction. The Budgeting for Opioid Addiction Treatment Act -- known as the LifeBOAT Act -- would establish a funding stream. Murphy called it an innovative piece of legislation. 

Lori Mack / WNPR

The American Health Care Act, which is the House Republican bill to replace Obamacare, includes a provision that would defund Planned Parenthood. The organization serves around 70,000 residents in Connecticut and Rhode Island.

On Christmas Day, I found out that I was pregnant. It was the best present I could have hoped for. My husband and I have wanted to start a family for years, and we could not wait to share the news with our loved ones.

But my initial exhilaration quickly turned to anxiety. As a physician, I knew many of the things that could go wrong. I wanted to do everything I could do to have a healthy baby.

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Is marijuana a harmless way to relax or a dangerous gateway drug? The science says “no” and “we don’t know,” respectively. Arguments for and against legalization often misrepresent the medical effects of cannabis, some experts say.

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According to the World Health Organization, over 300 million people worldwide suffer from depression -- and treatments can be hit or miss. But two recent studies by Yale researchers have led to a new tool that may better personalize treatments for patients.

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