history

The Faith Middleton Show
4:33 pm
Mon May 21, 2012

Authors of Stealing the Mystic Lamb and Spellbound

Javier Carcamo/flickr creative commons

Stealing the Mystic Lamb: The World's Most Coveted Masterpiece

Jan van Eyck’s Ghent Altarpiece is on any art historian’s list of the ten most important paintings ever made. Often referred to by the subject of its central panel, The Adoration of the Mystic Lamb, it represents the fulcrum between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. It is also the most frequently stolen artwork of all time.

Read more
History
3:17 pm
Fri February 24, 2012

A Beautiful and Goodly Tree

When Thomas Hooker and his party reached Hartford in 1636, they would have found majestic elm trees growing in the meadows along the Connecticut River.

Read more
Antarctica
11:55 am
Fri January 27, 2012

Sixty Degrees Below Zero

"What a night - couldn't see my hand in front of my face, so dropped down on all fours and crawled in the direction of the tractor, - just a few feet away mind you, and I just don't know how long it did take me to reach the back door of the tractor which was now half buried in the snowdrift...recorded -60 below." wrote Connecticut native John Henry Von der Wall on September 25, 1934. Von der Wall was a member of an Antarctic expedition led by Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd. Byrd was the first person to fly over the South Pole and North Pole.

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
2:45 pm
Wed January 25, 2012

The Art (And Glut) Of Memoir

Flickr Creative Commons, craigfinlay

My e-mail inbox is full of pitches for memoirs.

Here's one by Deirdre Marie Capone called, "Uncle Al." The press release refers to Al Capone as her uncle and promises us inside-the-family insights about the Valentnie's Day Massacre as well as "authentic Capone family recipes."  It concludes: Deirdre relates what life was like growing up the grand niece of Public Enemy #1, Al Capone.

Read more
The Faith Middleton Show
11:52 am
Wed November 23, 2011

An Uncommon History Of Common Courtesy, And Pearl Harbor Christmas

AngryJulieMonday/flickr creative commons

An Uncommon History of Common Courtesy: How Manners Shaped the World

Read more
World War Two
1:20 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Stalin Digital Archive Unveiled

Yale

Yale University Press unveiled its online “Stalin Digital Archive” today. The archive contains newly declassified documents, including Stalin’s personal papers, and communications with heads of state during the Great Purges.

Several years ago, Yale University Press director John Donatich traveled to Russia. Men in white lab coats escorted him deep into Stalin’s archive, where he was handed Stalin’s personal copy of  Lenin’s book:  'The State and Revolution'.

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
1:58 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

John Sayles' "Amigo"

Variance Films

It has been called "The Forgotten War", but it's not forgotten by writer and director John Sayles, who is on the show to talk about his newest film about the Philippine-American war, "Amigo".

Read more
Artifact Recovery
8:41 am
Fri October 7, 2011

International Center For The Study Of Machu Picchu And Inca Culture Opens In Peru

Diane Orson

The International Center for the Study of Machu Picchu and Inca Culture opened yesterday in the city of Cusco, Peru. The event marks the end of a long-running dispute over a collection of antiquities taken from Machu Picchu by Yale explorer Hiram Bingham nearly 100 years ago. It's also the beginning of a collaborative partnership between Yale and the National University of San Antonio Abad del Cusco .  

Speaking to reporters in Cusco, Yale researcher Lucy Salazar explained that museum is housed in a historic Inca palace called the Casa Concha.  

Read more
Education
10:57 am
Fri September 9, 2011

Teaching About 9/11

Diane Orson

As the nation prepares to commemorate the tenth anniversary of September 11th,  Connecticut schools are holding special assemblies and classroom discussions. We report on some of the challenges facing educators who teach students about 9/11, and the larger issues that surround the historic event.

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
9:33 am
Wed August 24, 2011

Where Are They Now?

DieselDemon, Flickr Creative Commons

I think a lot about the difference between this show and the shows I did for 16 years in commercial drive time radio. Our shows at WNPR tend to be contained. We geek out on a subject for one episode and then let it go as we get ready for something else. Topics and storylines tend not to spill over from day to day to day they way they do in commercial talk.
That's fine. We don't get stale.

Read more
Where We Live
10:49 am
Wed August 17, 2011

Rebranding The "Rising Star"

For a decade now, Hartford has been “New England’s Rising Star.” It never really caught on, did it?

That “branding” campaign was pretty widely ridiculed from the moment it was first unveiled. Why? Because people who know the city...who know its story...don’t really believe in what that slogan says.

It IS however, a city with an amazing history...linked with innovation and risk...and its a place just struggling enough that someone with imagination, creativity and daring might make it big.

Read more
Where We Live
10:28 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Connecticut Civil War History Tour

juliejordanscott

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the American Civil War, and the state of Connecticut is paying tribute.

Earlier this year, we talked a bit about Connecticut’s civil war history - and got a big response.  Including from our friend, author and historian Bill Hosley.  

Read more
Where We Live
9:41 am
Fri July 8, 2011

Olmsted's Legacy

Where We Live
10:42 am
Thu June 23, 2011

Where We Live: Cocktails, A History Of

creative commons

WNPR has a popular regular show where food and drink flows freely.  This is not that show.

Yes, while Faith Middleton's Food Schmooze gets ready to crown a “Connecticut state cocktail” tonight - we’ll take our “sober” look at the history of the cocktail.

Read more
Literature
1:49 pm
Mon June 6, 2011

Final Chapters Of 'Gone With The Wind' Aren't Gone

For years, the original manuscript of the novel Gone With the Wind was believed to have been destroyed.  But as WNPR’s Diane Orson reports, the last four chapters recently re-appeared in a Southport, Connecticut library.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell tells the sweeping story of a headstrong Scarlett O’Hara and her turbulent love affair with Rhett Butler – set against the backdrop of the Civil War. The film starring Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh received ten Academy Awards. 

Read more
Veterans in History
10:13 am
Fri May 27, 2011

Hometown Hero

Frank and Bogumita Budleski immigrated from Poland in the early 20th century. Their two children, Frances and Stanley, grew up on the family farm in the Yalesville section of Wallingford. Frances attended Skidmore and New York University and taught and performed music in Wallingford for many years.

Read more
History
10:13 am
Fri May 27, 2011

Hometown Hero

Frank and Bogumita Budleski immigrated from Poland in the early 20th century.  Their two children, Frances and Stanley, grew up on the family farm in the Yalesville section of Wallingford.  Frances attended Skidmore and New York University and taught and performed music in Wallingford for many years.

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
3:17 pm
Tue May 24, 2011

Celebrating Three Famous 'Harriets'

Chion Wolf

***Gwendolyn Quezaire-Presutti will perform as Harriet Tubman Monday, July 11, from 1 to 2 p.m. at John J. Sullivan's in Ansonia.***

Today we're doing an all-Harriet show, featuring Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Tubman and Harriet the Spy.

Read more
History
1:55 pm
Fri May 20, 2011

Making Connecticut

Simon Raahauge DeSantis, 2010

What is Connecticut’s story? What happened and who’s in it? Ambitious questions, and the Connecticut Historical Society’s new permanent exhibit, Making Connecticut, is the place to go to explore some answers. Opening on May 25, Making Connecticut is the state’s only overview exhibit of Connecticut history. Displaying more than 500 artifacts, clothing items, documents, images, and photographs, it’s about how Connecticut has changed from the 1500s to today, focusing on people, their lives and work, and the world around them.                                        

Read more
History
2:21 pm
Fri May 13, 2011

Hartford’s Great Fire Commissioner

Between 1864 and 1947 the City of Hartford utilized a board of fire commissioners to run its fire department.  These commissioners provided direction to the Fire Chief who transformed the policies of the commissioners into direct action.  The most well-known of all the commissioners was Horace B. Clark. 

Commissioner Clark had more than just an interest in the H.F.D.; he was passionate about it, and he had all of the modern day resources necessary to help serve his passion.  It must have helped greatly that when he decided to marry in 1898, his bride was worth 3 million dollars.

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
2:58 pm
Thu May 12, 2011

Making Connecticut A Character In Stories

Flickr Creative Commons: Norman B. Leventhal Map Center @ BPL

Psychogeography was defined by Guy Debord as "the study of the precise laws and specific effects of the geographical environment, consciously organized or not, on the emotions and behavior of individuals."

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
3:01 pm
Mon May 9, 2011

Remembering 'The '60s In Connecticut'

Chion Wolf

Watching the new CPTV documentary "The '60s in Connecticut," I reminded again of the way collective memory shapes and archives traumatic events.

Read more
History
12:13 pm
Fri May 6, 2011

Dear Daughter

"…and I sit down to write to my dear little girl wondering if she is thinking of me as I am of her."

Mary C. Stone letter to Elizabeth Stone, October 22, 1893, Ms 77458. Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, CT

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
2:42 pm
Wed May 4, 2011

Crowbar Governor & The Senator From Central Casting

Chion Wolf

I've been plowing through two biographies of Connecticut political titans -- Morgan Bulkeley who was Hartford mayor, Connecticut governor and a US Senator during the Gilded Age -- and Tom Dodd, Nuremberg prosecutor, Congressman, and a US Senator.

Read more
History
1:48 pm
Fri April 29, 2011

Something’s Brewing

Arthur R. Newell

Beer connoisseurs believe that the United States is currently in a craft brewing renaissance. The number of microbreweries is at an all-time high and some American beers are considered to be the best in the world. But the history of brewing beer in Connecticut, like other states in America, has had its ups and downs.

Read more
Where We Live
11:16 am
Wed April 27, 2011

The Humanities

Creative Commons

Jim Leach says the humanities “expand understanding of human nature and the human condition.” 

Leach is a former congressman and champion collegiate wrestler.  Both of these life skills come in handy as he navigates federal funding in his role as Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities.  

Leach is touring all 50 states to talk about the role the humanities play in our daily lives.  He was recently in Connecticut, and came to our Hartford studios.

Read more
History
8:35 am
Mon April 25, 2011

Spring Is In the Air

If you like these things, then spring must make your heart beat a little faster. But even those of us who would rather not spend a moment planting, weeding, smelling mulch, or standing in line at the garden store, would occasionally like to admire someone else’s garden – or just a pot of well-tended flowers. So, in honor of all gardeners, past and present, the CHS has created a small hallway display of garden-related objects from our collections.

Read more
History
10:07 am
Sat April 16, 2011

News From Lexington

A few days after the initial conflicts between the colonial militia and the British troops in Lexington and Concord, the New Haven printer Amos Doolittle traveled to the scene of the action to interview eye-witnesses and to produce a series of prints depicting the momentous events of April 19, 1775.

Read more
Environmental Protection
11:02 am
Fri April 15, 2011

Lecture Series Marks 40th Anniversary Of DEP

Chion Wolf

Forty years ago this month the state of Connecticut created the Department of Environmental Protection. The D.E.P. is marking the occasion by launching a lecture series. As WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports the goal is to stimulate thinking about the agency’s expanding role.

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
3:17 pm
Thu April 14, 2011

Vinyl Records Aren't Going Away

Flickr Creative Commons, pincusvt

We're talking today about independent record stores. At first I thought the show would be mostly about the romance of vinyl, but I see now that that's not the point. (Or at least that the emphasis should be on romance and not on vinyl.

Read more

Pages