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Yale University said Tuesday it will remove a "problematic" doorway stone carving that depicts a Puritan settler aiming a musket at a Native American, a decision that follows criticism for initially covering up the musket with removable stonework.

Georg Aumer / Flickr

We originally aired this show last August, a full year before the excitement over the solar eclipse. Enjoy!

What can you say about the sun? It sits not only at the center of our solar system but has, over time, been at the center of religions, scriptures, songs, art and countless other aspects of our culture.

Mark Dixon / Creative Commons

How do you confront hate?

This hour, we dive into this resurgent — and unfortunate — reality. Should we tolerate hate? Or should we be intolerant? Do we fight hate with more hatred, or something else? We talk about all this, along with the recent incidents in Charlottesville and Boston.

A proposed memorial honoring World War II veterans is causing controversy. The dispute focuses on just who should be honored.

The memorial is designed to be an exact copy of one that was removed in 1959 to make way for a new highway. It honored black veterans who served in World War II, but only covers those who enlisted or were drafted through 1943.

How Did The Confederate Flag Come North?

Aug 18, 2017

Christina Hunt Wood lives upstate, in Delaware County. In 2015, soon after the mass shootings at a church in Charleston, SC, she started noticing Confederate flags everywhere.

Daniel Orts / Flickr

Since the earliest humans gazed up at the sky, eclipses have been a common occurrence. But only in recent centuries have we come to understood the science behind them. Prior to that, eclipses were regarded as everything from Viking sky wolves to Korean fire-dogs, to African versions of a celestial reconciliation.

Updated at 4:59 p.m. ET

President Trump stood by his heavily criticized defense of monuments commemorating the Confederacy in a series of tweets Thursday morning. Trump said removing the statues of Confederate generals meant removing "beauty" — that would "never able to be comparably replaced" — from American cities. As he did in a Tuesday press conference, he also attempted to equate some Confederate generals with some of the Founding Fathers.

Strung together, the tweets read:

NASA's Earth Observatory / Creative Commons

Guam came into America's consciousness this past week as the war of words between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un threatened the island of Guam with nuclear annihilation. The rhetoric has since cooled but America is more aware of how little they really know about Guam or how much the legacy of war is part of their daily life. 

Jon Callas / Creative Commons

Hartford has long been known as the insurance capital of the world, but will that change now that insurance giant, Aetna, is moving its headquarters out of the state?

This hour, we examine the past and future of insurance in Connecticut — and beyond.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Coming up: We find out how researchers are working to preserve the world's most endangered languages -- including a look at locally-based efforts to expand fluency of the Mohegan language.

But first: reaction to the weekend’s news out of Charlottesville.

We check in with former Virginia residents and we also hear from you.

How do you interpret this latest incident of racism and violence? Do you worry that something similar could happen here in Connecticut? 

Annapurna Productions, LLC

Mark Boal is a journalist who has written for Rolling Stone and Playboy and who partnered with Serial on the podcast's second season. Kathryn Bigelow is the director behind movies like Point Blank and Strange Days. As writer and director, Boal and Bigelow have collaborated on three films.

Alice Collins Plebuch

Unearthing family history -- one saliva sample at a time.

This hour: how low-cost DNA testing helped spawn an industry and, with it, a new wave of genealogical sleuthing.

Ancestry.com, 23andMe, Family Tree DNA -- how far are you willing to go and how much are you willing to spend to better understand your roots? 

An Ode To Ink

Aug 9, 2017
Zach Reeder / Flickr

From ancient scrolls to modern toner cartridges, ink (in one form or another) has been around for millennia. And while we may take it for granted now, it was for much of that time a precious and coveted substance.

James Baker / flickr creative commons

Where have all the guitar heroes gone? Where has all the guitar music gone? Where have all the guitar sales gone?

Are rumors of the electric guitar's death exaggerated or no?

Yale University

Here's something that might make you might think twice before ordering a bucket of drumsticks: tasty as they may be, those cooked morsels of meat actually come from... dinosaurs.

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