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Warner Bros.

It's quite a trick Christopher Nolan has played on us over the course of a career that includes movies like Memento and Inception. His latest, Dunkirk, weaves together three storylines: One takes place on land over a week. One takes place on the sea over a day. And one takes place in the air over an hour. I walked out of the theater thinking, "That was a pretty straightforward narrative for a Christopher Nolan movie." The Nose has a lot to say about this new epic.

Rahoul Ghose / PBS

Norman Lear was born on July 27, 1922 in New Haven, Connecticut. In countless interviews, Lear has said he was born in New Haven, and grew up in Hartford -- which is only partially true.

Gage Skidmore / flickr creative commons

You might say that we’ve done a lot of coverage of The Trump Era.

It began with a show sixteen months ago that imagined a Trumpian future. We didn't take it terribly seriously then. We do now.

This hour, we've gathered a number of the people we've talked to along the way for a retrospective: Where have we been since last March, since Election Day, since Inauguration Day?

Teaching An Old Fox New Tricks

Jul 26, 2017
C Watts / flickr creative commons

In 1959, Soviet geneticist Dmitri Belyaev started an ambitious experiment to study the origins of domestication -- he would attempt to breed domesticated wild foxes by selecting on their behavior alone, a process he imagined our ancestors carried out with dogs thousands of years before.

This hour, we look at the history and progress of this more-than-50-year experiment: What can it tell us about our animal companions -- and ourselves?

Who Owns Antiquity?

Jul 20, 2017
Alan / flickr creative commons

Hobby Lobby recently paid a $3 million fee for illegally buying smuggled ancient Iraqi artifacts.

This hour: What is the relationship between collecting antiquities and the looting of them in countries that are experiencing violent conflicts and societal breakdown? Do Western museums and collections have a role to play in saving at-risk antiquities?

Uli Rahms / Flickr

The word bastard hasn't always been meant to offend. Used simply as an indication of illegitimate birth at first, the label bastard didn't bring with it shame or stigmatization until long after it first appeared in the Middle Ages.

Photo Courtesy Martin Podskoch / Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

In the midst of the Great Depression more than 80 years ago, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps — giving jobs to young men to support their families, while conserving the country’s wild lands and upgrading our state parks.

This hour, we learn about the CCC’s impact in Connecticut and we hear from one “CCC boy” who is now 102 years old.

Yale University

Here's something that might make you might think twice before ordering a bucket of drumsticks: tasty as they may be, those cooked morsels of meat actually come from... dinosaurs.

This hour, we take a closer look at what paleontologists have learned about the prehistoric ancestors of modern-day birds

RM Bradley Co.

After years on the market, the abandoned 19th century Connecticut village called Johnsonville was purchased last week. The Philippines-based international church Iglesia Ni Cristo scooped up the property for $1.8 million.

Muzeum Lubelskie w Lublinie / Courtesty of Stacey Fitzgerald

During World War II the Nazis experimented on Polish women among others at Ravensbrück concentration camp outside of Berlin. After the war, socialite and Connecticut resident Caroline Ferriday helped bring dozens of these women to the U.S. for medical treatment. 

Wilson Webb / Sony Pictures

Baby, played by Ansel Elgort, is a reluctant getaway driver in the latest Edgar Wright film, "Baby Driver." He's a good guy who's had some bad luck, like stealing the cash-filled car of a crime boss while coping with the death of his mom.

It has been 80 years since Amelia Earhart vanished while trying to become the first female pilot to fly around the world, and her 1937 disappearance has become one of the great mysteries of our time.

Thomas Hart / Wikimedia Commons

When you "pull a Benedict Arnold," you sell out your side to join the stronger side of a situation out of fear, not honor.  Needless to say, that's not a compliment.

More than 230 years after America secured independence from Britain, this skilled warrior and confidante of George Washington is remembered as a traitor and coward for defecting to the British side.

But it's not that easy.  

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center / Creative Commons

Long before our modern highways, there was an extensive network of Native American trails up and down the East Coast.

This hour, we hear about efforts to map these old trails and find out how they’re helping archaeologists and others learn about the past. 

Ryohei Noda / Creative Commons

Hannah Arendt's 576-page magnum opus, The Origins of Totalitarianism, is a densely-written book about the rise of anti-Semitism up to the outbreak of World War I. The book sold out on Amazon within one month of the 2016 election in which America elected Donald Trump as their next president. 

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