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There were once more than 20 operating theaters in downtown Bridgeport alone. They welcomed thousands of people each week, from workers just getting off their shifts at the city's factories to the kids that came every Saturday for Westerns. Today, only two are still standing, and they've been empty for 40 years.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Herbert Hoover realized early in the 20th century that food was as important as bullets to win a war. After witnessing Belgians starve under the harsh treatment of Germany before World War I, he determined to never let that happen in America. So, when the men marched off to war in both World War I and again in World War II, the women marched out to the fields. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we remember Women’s History Month with tributes to the inspiring twentieth-century women -- the so-called "motor girls" and "Kalamazoo gals" -- who helped shape American history and American industry. 

Peabody Awards / flickr creative commons

For years, there have been rumors about things Louis CK may or may not have done to women. And for years, women have been saying that CK should address the rumors. He hasn't really, and so the rumors have stayed rumors so far.

Matt Deavenport / flickr creative commons

It's been called a "glorified game of toss" and "World of Warcraft for extroverts." But has Ultimate Frisbee quietly become a real sport?

It is, apparently, a likely Olympic sport. Which would, apparently, maybe be bad for Ultimate.

Universityarchives.com

Four letters written by reclusive American author J.D. Salinger went on the market earlier this week at Westport-based universityarchives.com. Three of the letters were written in Westport, where Salinger lived when he wrote his classic novel The Catcher in the Rye.

Open Grid Scheduler / Grid Engine / flickr creative commons

As the Department of Homeland Security collects plans for the US-Mexico border, the conversation is turning more towards how border walls don't work in keeping people out.

This hour, we talk about what walls are effective in dividing: our psyches, our environments, and the populations around them.

Anita Friend / Flickr

If it's the clothes that make the man, then it's the costume that makes the superhero. But for as much as these brightly colored onesies reveal about their wearer, they may in fact reveal more about us as a society.

Muzeum Lubelskie w Lublinie / Courtesty of Stacey Fitzgerald

During World War II the Nazis experimented on Polish women among others at Ravensbrück concentration camp outside of Berlin. After the war, socialite and Connecticut resident Caroline Ferriday helped bring dozens of these women to the U.S. for medical treatment. 

Photo Courtesy Martin Podskoch / Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

In the midst of the Great Depression more than 80 years ago, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps — giving jobs to young men to support their families, while conserving the country’s wild lands and upgrading our state parks.

This hour, we revisit our show on the CCC’s impact in Connecticut and we hear from one “CCC boy” who is now 102 years old.

Green Fuse Films Inc.

On the one hand, obituaries are an amalgam of a bunch of different kinds of journalism: they're feature stories, they're profile pieces, they cover history, and they're hard news too.

On the other hand, the subject is always... dead.

This week, Newport is hosting a first in the sailing world: the J Class world championships. J Class yachts are rare, and they’re huge. 

Yale University said Tuesday it will remove a "problematic" doorway stone carving that depicts a Puritan settler aiming a musket at a Native American, a decision that follows criticism for initially covering up the musket with removable stonework.

Georg Aumer / Flickr

We originally aired this show last August, a full year before the excitement over the solar eclipse. Enjoy!

What can you say about the sun? It sits not only at the center of our solar system but has, over time, been at the center of religions, scriptures, songs, art and countless other aspects of our culture.

Mark Dixon / Creative Commons

How do you confront hate?

This hour, we dive into this resurgent — and unfortunate — reality. Should we tolerate hate? Or should we be intolerant? Do we fight hate with more hatred, or something else? We talk about all this, along with the recent incidents in Charlottesville and Boston.

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