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health care

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In 2016, a Swedish brewery offered for sale artisanally-prepared potato chips. $59 for five chips in what looks like a jeweler's box. They sold out. Crazy, right?

But be honest: Have you gone to more than one place looking for just the right coffee bean or golden beet or ...something? Meanwhile, behind all this posturing, what do Americans really cook and eat?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When it comes to the nation’s opioid crisis, substance abuse affects more than the addict. More and more children are entering the foster care system every year at an unprecedented rate.

Carmen Baskauf / WNPR

Highly drug resistant gonorrhea has been reported in England. It’s the latest in a growing list of superbugs that are becoming resistant to last-resort antibiotics.

For much of the last century, doctors have been able to cure many once-fatal bacterial infections with a simple course of meds. But over the years, diseases have evolved and even the best drugs aren’t enough to combat the deadly bacteria.

This hour, we ask an infectious disease specialist--how worried should we be?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In light of mismanaged abuse allegations involving two former staffers, U.S. Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty announced Monday she will not seek re-election in November.

This hour, we discuss the significance of Esty's decision -- including what it means for Connecticut's Fifth Congressional District race this year.

Plus: With former VA Secretary David Shulkin out, what lies head for U.S. Veterans Affairs? Is the federal agency on track to become privatized? We find out.

And finally: We sit down with a local Army veteran who recently received a discharge upgrade. Could his story help other Connecticut veterans with less than honorable discharges? 

Dying In Prison

Mar 27, 2018
Rennett Stowe / Creative Commons

"Compassionate release" of our sickest and oldest prisoners is a way to reduce the federal prison population. It's also meant to save on the high cost of health care for aging inmates, and show some -  well, compassion, to prisoners closing in on the end of their lives. 

tanjila ahmed/flickr creative commons

Massachusetts is rolling out legal recreational marijuana sales this summer, with pot shops scheduled to open in July.

Mohd Fazlin Mohd Effendy Ooi Follow / Creative Commons

This hour, we discuss the debate concerning a woman’s right to abort her fetus following a Down syndrome diagnosis.

We also look at how advances in medical technology have changed the way health professionals screen for the a genetic disorder during pregnancy.

How far has prenatal testing progressed? And where is it headed? We find out.

Source: United States Census Bureau, Connecticut Department of Public Health Credit: Patrick Skahill

Figures on overdose deaths grab headlines, but treatment data could save lives. In response, health officials have released new information on emergency room visits for drug overdoses, numbers that paint a fuller picture of the state's opioid crisis.

Photo by Jacqueline Serna/Americares

Six months on from Hurricane Maria, Stamford-based nonprofit Americares still has staff in Puerto Rico, helping the island’s health services recover from the storm and provide much-needed care to residents.

Paul Villavisanis / Creative Commons

Do you ever think about the people who make sure the medicine you're taking is safe for you to take? If your like most of us, probably not. 

Lydia Brown / WNPR

It’s the deadliest drug crisis in our nation’s history and communities in Connecticut are coming together to talk about solutions.

This hour, we listen back to a recent opioid panel recorded at Gateway Community College in New Haven.

What’s the best way to support individuals and families battling substance abuse -- especially when one size does not fit all?

Tania Caruso / Flickr

Where do gender disparities exist for women and girls in our state? And how do we address them?

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It's expensive to die in America. We spend upwards of $3 trillion on medical care, a large percentage of those dollars concentrated in the last year of a person's life.

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

In the event the federal government reduces funding for Planned Parenthood, Governor Dannel Malloy pledged that Connecticut’s Office of Policy and Management would pay $6 million in Medicaid reimbursement to keep Connecticut’s 17 Planned Parenthood centers up and running.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Federal regulators say they want more information about the proposed merger between health insurer Aetna and pharmacy chain CVS. Antitrust experts at the Department of Justice have issued what’s known as a second request for information about the $69 billion deal. 

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