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health care

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In the event the federal government reduces funding for Planned Parenthood, Governor Dannel Malloy pledged that Connecticut’s Office of Policy and Management would pay $6 million in Medicaid reimbursement to keep Connecticut’s 17 Planned Parenthood centers up and running.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Federal regulators say they want more information about the proposed merger between health insurer Aetna and pharmacy chain CVS. Antitrust experts at the Department of Justice have issued what’s known as a second request for information about the $69 billion deal. 

U.S. Senator Chris Murphy, D-Conn., says he believes Congress will eventually reauthorize federal funding for the Community Health Center Fund, which constitutes the largest chunk of federal money that goes to community health centers. Murphy gave the assurance to health care providers and clients at an OPTIMUS Health Care clinic in Bridgeport’s East Side neighborhood on Thursday.

Lydia Brown / WNPR

It’s the deadliest drug crisis in our nation’s history and communities in Connecticut are coming together to talk about solutions.

This hour, we listen back to a recent opioid panel recorded at Gateway Community College in New Haven.

What’s the best way to support individuals and families battling substance abuse -- especially when one size does not fit all?

Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

Tonight, President Trump will deliver his first State of the Union address to Congress—and to America.

Government of Prince Edward Island / Creative Commons

The Department of Public Health is offering a first-of-its kind free flu clinic this weekend, in response to an aggressive flu season making its way across the U.S. and the world.

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The Affordable Care Act required Americans to carry some form of health insurance. But the new federal tax bill will eliminate what’s called an “individual mandate” for the 2019 tax year.

The American Red Cross has raised the alert on its blood supply to "critical" -- the last step before "emergency."

A former pharmaceutical industry official who says drug prices are too high will now be in charge of buying more medications than anyone in the world.

Alex Azar, former president of the U.S. arm of Eli Lilly & Co., was confirmed Wednesday as the secretary of health and human services.

In that role, he'll oversee the Food and Drug Administration, which regulates prescription drugs including those produced by his former employer. He'll also oversee Medicare and Medicaid, which together spend hundreds of billions of dollars each year on prescription medications.

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Congress blew past a September 30 deadline to reauthorize federal funding for about 1,200 community health centers nationwide. The funding lapse is already having an impact in Connecticut.

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Acceptance for medical marijuana is growing among people who swear by marijuana's power to relieve their ills. Older people are choosing marijuana for their aches and pains, parents are moving to states where marijuana is legal for children with seizure disorders, even pet owners are using pot to ease their pup's pain.  It's currently legal in 28 states with several more on deck.

Thor_Deichmann / Pixabay

Home DNA kits like 23andMe or Ancestry are a fun way to learn about your family and your own body. But what happens when exploring your genome uncovers disturbing information about your health?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: following reports of abuse by staff at Connecticut’s maximum-security psychiatric unit -- news of an order separating Whiting Forensic from Connecticut Valley Hospital. 

Coming up, we discuss the significance of the split -- including what it means for the safety and oversight of patients.

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A lot more attention has been paid in recent years to addressing the needs of kids with severe developmental delays and diagnoses like autism. But a new study finds that we're not offering the best help to kids who may have more moderate needs.

Till Westermayer / Flickr

For someone with food allergies, a taste of peanut butter or a bite of shellfish could be life-threatening.

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