free speech

Charlie Hebdo Shooting
1:30 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

Despite Persistent Threats, Connecticut Cartoonists Say Shootings Still Feel Surreal

A memorial for victims of the Charlie Hebdo shootings.
Sozialfotografie [►] StR Flickr Creative Commons

Less than a week after the deadly shootings at the headquarters of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, political cartoonists in the U.S. are still processing what happened to their colleagues.

Two Connecticut-based cartoonists spoke on WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show about reactions they get to their work. Matt Davies, staff cartoonist for Newsday, and Dan Perkins, syndicated cartoonist better known as Tom Tomorrow, called some of the feedback "nasty" and "frightening."

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The Colin McEnroe Show
1:00 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

The Scramble: Cartoonist's Psyche, D'Angelo, and "Transparent"

Two Connecticut cartoonists join us to respond to last week's shootings in Paris.
Aurelien Guichard Creative Commons

Today on the Scramble, we talk to two cartoonists about the road ahead from the Charlie Hebdo massacre. I'm still wrestling with some of my own questions about what this story means to the world of satire, which I consider vitally important to the health of the world.

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Free Speech
2:58 pm
Thu January 8, 2015

Cartoons Are Still Shaking the World, Surprising Some

A participant in a Paris vigil on January 7 holds a sign in support of free speech ("And I blaspheme if I want to!!").
Gerry Lauzon Creative Commons

Even though riots broke out around the world after satirical images of the Prophet Muhammad were published in Denmark ten years ago, one expert says analysts were surprised that cartoons could still provoke a terrorist attack like the Paris massacre.

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France
4:26 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

French Media, Public Rally Behind 'Charlie Hebdo'

Pens are thrown on the ground during a vigil in Paris following a deadly attack at the offices of Charlie Hebdo, the weekly satirical magazine.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 8:58 pm

This much is certain: Charlie Hebdo will live another day.

The magazine, which was the target of a deadly attack Wednesday, will be kept going through financial and editorial backing from some of France's largest media groups.

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Where We Live
10:40 pm
Sun January 4, 2015

How Important Is Civility To Protest?

Michael Lynch is a professor of Philosophy at UConn and the author of “In Praise of Reason: Why Rationality Matters for Democracy”
Chion Wolf WNPR

The success of a society depends - at least in part - on the civility of its members. Mutual respect, openness to different viewpoints...civil conversation is what we try to promote here on our show. 

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Russia
11:36 am
Tue December 30, 2014

Yale World Fellow and Putin Opponent Convicted in Russia

Russian activist and former Yale World Fellow Alexei Navalny
Evgeny Feldman Wikimedia Commons

Updated at 11:36 a.m. 

A Russian activist with ties to Yale University has received a suspended sentence on fraud charges. Alexei Navalny has become a prominent political opposition leader in Russia, leading protests over the years against President Vladimir Putin. 

According to the Associated Press, thousands of protestors took to the streets outside the Kremlin in response to the conviction. Navalny was subsequently arrested for breaking the terms of his house arrest and joining the protestors.

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China
9:56 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Hong Kong Students March On Chief Executive's Residence

Pro-democracy protesters carrying portraits of Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying march to his residence in Hong Kong on Wednesday.
Bobby Yip Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 11:27 am

Activists in Hong Kong, angered by what they perceive as little progress in talks on democratic reforms with the government, marched to the home of the territory's chief executive to demand his ouster.

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Journalism
5:10 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

Yale Holds Talk on Investigative Reporting in Time of Surveillance

Steve Coll speaks at Yale Law School.
Jeff Cohen WNPR

The case of Edward Snowden sparked worldwide discussions about the reach of government into the personal, and technological, lives of its citizens. One of those discussions continued at Yale Law School on Tuesday. 

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Student Protest
1:52 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

At UConn, Does "Civility" Trump Free Speech?

George Washington University, 2005
dcJohn / Creative Commons

On August 28, UConn held a pep rally for the football team on a patio outside the Student Union. The 6:00 pm event included the UConn marching band and cheerleaders, and was emceed by UConn IMG Sports Radio Network -- pretty typical for this sports-crazy campus.

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World
3:36 am
Mon June 2, 2014

For One Soldier At Tiananmen, A Day 'Never Forgotten'

Artist and former soldier Chen Guang stands with one of his paintings last year that depicts the scene when he helped clear Tiananmen Square as a soldier.
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 3:15 pm

Hour after hour passed as Chen Guang stood, gun trembling in his hands, behind the doors of Beijing's Great Hall of the people, waiting for the order to clear Tiananmen Square of its student protesters.

It was 1989, and Chen was a 17-year-old soldier from a small town whose life was changed by his role in the bloody crackdown. His account offers a sharply different perspective of the events of June 3 and 4, 1989, when martial law troops fought their way into the center of Beijing, killing hundreds of people, mainly on approach roads into the square.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Free Speech in the Public Workplace; Employment Law; an Exit Interview with Teresa Younger

U.S. Supreme Court
Credit TexasGOPVote.com / Creative Commons

Sometimes the rulings of the narrowly-divided Supreme Court actually reflect the very divided views of the public and the delicate nature of the law.

But the 2006 decision in Garcetti v. Ceballos made a lot of people scratch their heads. In it, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that work-related statements made by public employees are not protected by the First Amendment.  

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Courts
3:37 am
Mon April 28, 2014

How A Public Corruption Scandal Became A Fight Over Free Speech

Monday the Supreme Court hears the case concerning what kind of speech is protected for public employees.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 1:31 pm

The current conservative Supreme Court majority has a well-earned reputation for protecting the First Amendment right to free speech, whether in the form of campaign spending or protests at military funerals.

But in one area — the First Amendment rights of public employees — the conservative majority has been far less protective of the right to speak out. Now the court is revisiting the issue, and the result could have far-reaching consequences for public corruption investigations.

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First Amendment
3:04 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Anti-Muslim Video Still Stirring Controversy In The Courtroom

Actress Cindy Lee Garcia (right) brought a copyright claim against Google with the help of attorney Cris Armenta over the film Innocence of Muslims, which was posted to YouTube in 2012.
Jason Redmond AP

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 11:43 pm

Google intends to fight a court order to remove a controversial anti-Muslim video from YouTube in the U.S.

The company plans to file for a hearing before a full nine-judge panel of the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals after two of three judges on a smaller panel forced the company to take down the film, Innocence of Muslims, which caused uproar in the Islamic world in 2012.

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Egypt
12:37 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

3 Al-Jazeera Journalists In Egypt Plead Not Guilty To Terrorist Links

Journalists hold placards as they demonstrate across the street from Egypt's embassy in central London, on Wednesday.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 2:44 pm

Three journalists working for Qatar-based network Al-Jazeera English who are on trial in Egypt for their alleged links to the Muslim Brotherhood have pleaded not guilty on Thursday. The trio were denied bail and their trial was adjourned until March 5.

Australian Peter Greste, Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohammed, wearing white prison outfits, appeared in metal cages, according to Reuters, which says several others identified as al-Jazeera journalists are being tried in absentia.

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Ukraine
7:05 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Negotiations In Ukraine Under Close Scrutiny After Bloodshed

Riot police officers stand in Kiev's Independence Square on Wednesday as smoke rises from protesters' burning barricades.
Alexey Furman EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 11:13 pm

This post was updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

The U.S. and the European Union are closely watching Ukraine amid news that the government was starting negotiations with opposition leaders to end the violence, which has left more than two dozen people dead since Tuesday.

A statement on the Ukrainian presidential website said:

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Ukraine
2:12 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Anti-Government Protests In Ukraine Turn Deadly

Smoke from exploding fireworks and fires billows into the night sky as Ukrainians gather at Independence Square during continuing protests in Kiev on Tuesday.
Igor Kovalenko EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 12:01 am

This post was updated at 8:52 p.m. ET

Riot police stormed the main anti-government camp in central Kiev, the capital of Ukraine, on Tuesday. They fought with demonstrators armed with clubs and wearing helmets fought back. More than a dozen people were killed, including five policemen, according to AP and the BBC.

Opposition leaders met late in the day with President Viktor Yanukovych, but left without an agreement.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:29 am
Mon January 27, 2014

The Scramble Shares Limited Information About Today's Show: FOI and Football

In 2012, professional football players suffered 1,496 severe injuries.
Credit Ron Cogswell / Creative Commons

It's Monday. That means our show is The Scramble, where we make a lot of decisions on a last minute basis. We asked our super guest, Marc Tracy of The New Republic, to pick three topics about which Colin would quickly get up to speed. 

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Eastern Europe
8:32 am
Thu January 23, 2014

Sen. Murphy on Ukraine's "Turn for the Worse"

A line of protesters in Kiev on January 20, 2014.
Credit Mstyslav Chernov / Creative Commons

Protests in Ukraine have turned violent between anti-government demonstrators and the police. Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy visited that country last month to meet with both sides.

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Demonstrations in Kiev
7:28 am
Thu January 23, 2014

In Ukraine, Protesters Warn They'll Go 'On The Attack'

A protester walks pass burning tires in central Kiev, Ukraine, on Thursday.
Sergei Grits AP

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 8:24 pm

Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych has less than 24 hours to agree to hold early elections and lift anti-protest laws or the tens of thousands of demonstrators who have been in the streets of Kiev for days will go "on the attack," a leader of the opposition says.

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