film

Chion Wolf

Remakes are easy. Money-makers are hard. We live in a sloshing sea of those movie remakes but it's rare for one of them to out gross the original. An exception, oddly enough, was the remake of "Clash of the Titans," which significantly outperformed its 80s predecessor. 

Crooner Wade Visits Hartford

Feb 12, 2014
Adam Wade/Orbit Records

Besides being the first African-American to host a network TV game show, the versatile crooner/actor Adam Wade has enjoyed a more than half-century career crowned by countless appearances on stage, screen, and television, and a glorious, too brief flurry of chart-busting recordings in the 1960s. Among his hit singles was his tuneful trifecta of romantic ballads in 1961, "Take Good Care of Her," "As If I Didn’t Know," and "The Writing on the Wall." 

Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman was found dead on Sunday in his Manhattan apartment. He was 46.

Hoffman was steeped in his profession — in film, on stage, in the spotlight and behind the scenes.

In 2005, he won the Oscar for best actor for his portrayal of Truman Capote. The movie focuses on Capote's interviews with two murderers on death row for his nonfiction novel In Cold Blood.

Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, who won a best actor Oscar for the title role in the 2005 film Capote, was found dead in his Manhattan apartment at the age of 46.

A New York Police Department spokesman tells NPR that authorities are "investigating Hoffman's death as a possible drug overdose."

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Next Monday marks the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, International Holocaust Remembrance Day. Next week in Woodbridge and Madison, there will be two screenings of the film "Nicky’s Family," a Czech documentary that tells the nearly-forgotten story of Sir Nicholas Winton, a British stockbroker who organized the rescue of 669 children just before start of World War II. 

It's not even a matter of "snubs."

This year's Oscar nominations got it so wrong as to make a reasonable debate about what happens, going forward, almost impossible.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Nose panel went to the movies this week to see the critically-acclaimed Spike Jonze film, "Her," about a future world in which it's not unusual for a man to fall in love with his artificially-intelligent operating system. 

ToastyKen, Flickr Creative Commons

My two favorite film critics, A.O. Scott and David Edelstein, appear on the show today, and we've got a longer list of topics than we can possibly get to. I'm interested in the way a lot of the recent hit movies take little bites of our recent past: "Inside Llewyn Davis" tackles 1961. "American Hustle" bestrides the end of the 70s and beginning of the 80s. "The Wolf of Wall Street" started with the Crash of '87 and pans forward into the 1990s. Suddenly, for Baby Boomers, the stretch of our living memory is a series of period pieces and costume dramas.

Chion Wolf

The Nose panelists explore the hidden mysteries of the Coen Brothers' new film, Inside Llewyn Davis, based  on the early folk movement of 1960's Greenwich Village and one of its early pioneers, Dave Van Ronk. 

Blond, blue-eyed and wearing blazing white robes in Lawrence Of Arabia, Peter O'Toole was handsome enough — many said beautiful enough — to carry off the scene in which director David Lean simultaneously made stars of both his title character and his leading man.

Daniel Cohen

A time-lapse video created over two days shows the track repair work underway at the site of a Metro-North train derailment where four people died and 63 people were injured. 

Warner Bros.

Watching the movie "Captain Phillips" -- in which Tom Hanks plays a commercial freighter captain kidnapped by Somali pirates -- I had a sense of deja vu. Movies like this are becoming a type. They're about the interaction between the U.S. and people who don't like us. In "Zero Dark 30" and "Captain Phillips," a crack Seal team shows up, so much better equipped and trained than our adversaries that the whole thing feels like an overmatch.

Vox Efx / Wikimedia Commons

We're in New Haven today, and The Nose, our weekly culture panel, wants to talk about the hazards of 3D movies and the increasingly competitive world of Halloween costumes. And because we're in New Haven, we'll turn our attention to a couple of prominent stories down here. One of them -- not for the squeamish -- is the Poopetrator, a laundry prankster who has created such a national stir that even the official account for Clorox bleach is tweeting about him.

The Ebb & Flow Of Dada

Sep 23, 2013
Chion Wolf

It's an art form that came out of the chaos of World War One, when times were desperate, yet the art world was still celebrating still lifes, landscapes and nudes. In protest, artists began rebelling with politically aware ironic work, making bold, sometimes vicious points with their art. Times have changed, and Dada resurfaces periodically, like in the exhibition at the Pump House in Hartford opening on the 26th.

Chion Wolf

You can read a lot into media depictions of minorities.

Richard Pryor was  hilarious at it. One time he said he had just seen a movie called "Logan's Run." It was set in the future, and there were no black characters in it. "That means white folks ain't planning for us to be there," he said.

Media critic Eric Deggans joins us today, and one of his major theses is that extremism and division make for a bad public discourse and great television. Big media, says Deggans, thrive on division and tension, whether it's on cable news shows or reality TV.

Chion Wolf

Thirteen years ago, I wrote an amusing but fairly ignorant op-ed piece for The New York Times triggered by watching a planetarium movie narrated by Tom Hanks. I wrote: "I miss the days of the anonymous, nobody-special narrator. Playing next door to Mr. Hanks at the museum was a Mount Everest Imax movie narrated by Liam Neeson. Take a cab to get there, and Isaac Hayes tells you to take your stuff when you get out, and don't forget your receipt." 

(I)NTERVIEW: Harvey Hubbell V

Jun 17, 2013
CPBN Media Lab

Harvey Hubbell V is many things; chief among them he is a documentary filmmaker. His work has won many awards, including the Gold World Medal for Comedy at The New York Festivals and multiple Emmys. Harvey has worked in many aspects of production, meandering the professional halls of commercial work and feature films (Mr. Deeds, BlackMale), but has found his home in the documentarian world. “Commercials are film-lies” Harvey says, “…documentaries are film-truth”. The search for that film truth has taken Mr. Hubbell all across the great United States, Poland, Peru, and beyond.

Tom Hagerty via Flickr Creative Commons

Ballplayer: Pelotero is a film about the baseball pipeline between the Dominican Republic and Major League Baseball. One of the characters in the movie was Miguel Sano - a third baseman now in the Minnesota Twins organization.

Back in March, we spoke with one of the filmmaker’s behind Ballplayer: Pelotero, Jon Paley about their next project.

Chion Wolf

It began last night with a documentary about some of the greatest backup singers in rock and roll history, including Darlene Love, who is here, and a short film featuring Tony Shalhoub, who was here.

It will close with a screening of the much anticipated film "Frances Ha" directed by Noah Baumbach and starring Greta Gerwig, both of whom will be here. And in between, the Berkshire International Film Festival will show 26 other documentaries, 24 other feature films and 23 other shorts. Roughly 20 different countries will be represented in the mix.

Chion Wolf

It began last night with a documentary about some of the greatest backup singers in rock and roll history, including Darlene Love, who is here, and a short film featuring Tony Shalhoub, who was here.

It will close with a screening of the much anticipated film "Frances Ha" directed by Noah Baumbach and starring Greta Gerwig, both of whom will be here. And in between, the Berkshire International Film Festival will show 26 other documentaries, 24 other feature films and 23 other shorts. Roughly 20 different countries will be represented in the mix.

Troy David Johnston/flickr creative commons

Facts change all the time. Smoking has gone from doctor recommended to deadly. We used to think the Earth was the center of the universe and that Pluto was a planet. For decades, we were convinced that the brontosaurus was a real dinosaur. In short, what we know about the world is constantly changing. But it turns out there’s an order to the state of knowledge, an explanation for how we know what we know. Samuel Arbesman is an expert in the field of scientometrics—literally the science of science, and he’ll join us to look at The Half-Life of Facts.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/flickr creative commons

"One girl with courage is a revolution." Girl Rising, a documentary film directed by Academy Award-nominee Richard Robbins, tells the stories of nine extraordinary girls from nine countries, written by nine celebrated writers and narrated by nine renowned actresses. Martha Adams, from The Documentary Group, joins us to discuss the film.

'Marriage In the Movies'

Mar 12, 2013
License All rights reserved by ninethousand

So how might we best portray the realities of marriage? In a novel, perhaps?  A long-running TV drama or sitcom?  What about a movie?

Serious business indeed. It seems hard to translate the ins and outs of a long relationship in a 2-hour capsule.  Hollywood has been trying since the silent film age, but not always with success.  Wesleyan Film Historian Jeanine Basigner calls a story about marriage a “screenwriter’s nightmare” in her book I Do and I Don’t: A History of Marriage in the Movies.

Let's Get Creative

Mar 6, 2013
LaurMG (Wikimedia Commons)

We talk about creativity here on Where We Live every so often... it’s one of our favorite subjects. In fact, this year we’ll be partnering with Connecticut Creates - a consortium of creative people around the state - to have more of these conversations.

Today’s “creative conversation” is thanks to two dozen high school students from Watkinson School in Hartford, who are all pursuing a creative arts diploma in music, film, theater, dance, visual arts, or writing.

Portraying Lincoln

Feb 12, 2013
Catie Talarski

It’s argued that no one can do as good of a job of portraying President Lincoln on film as Daniel Day-Lewis. 

Lincoln, the movie, is up for 12 Academy Awards. But weeks before the Oscars, Connecticut Congressman Joe Courtney is asking the studio to alter an inaccuracy that puts Connecticut on the wrong side of the slavery debate.

Chion Wolf

The Sundance Film Festival just announced this year’s lineup - and it’s a record year for women. Eight of the sixteen films are directed by women, the most in the festivals 33 year history - the first time the entries have been split between male and female directors. So maybe females in the industry are making strides, but it’s still a hard road for independents of any gender.

Courtesy of Page 124 Productions

Most people have heard of "AA" or Alcoholics Anonymous.  The international program is credited with helping thousands of alcoholics recover from their addiction. It's membership totals two million worldwide.

But not many outside of AA know about the man who co-founded the organization. His name was Bill Wilson. A documentary about him opens Friday in New Haven at  Bow Tie Criterion Cinemas.

WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil spoke with Co-Producer and Director of the film, Kevin Hanlon.  More about the film can be found here: 

quapan

From Frank Abagnale in "Catch Me If You Can" to "The Return of Martin Guerre" to "The Music Man," we are entertained and amused by stories of impostors.

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