elderly

Reinhold Behringer / Creative Commons

The World Health Organization has selected Greater New Haven as one of 15 urban areas worldwide to pilot a planned “age-friendly city indicator guide”.  

Alyssa L. Miller / WNPR

My mother was an Alzheimer's patient. I think it's fair to say the disease killed her although like a lot of people in their 80's with serious illnesses, she got caught in a whirlpool of problems that made it hard to pin the blame on any one thing.

Aundrea Murray / WNPR

America is growing older, and so is its population of HIV-positive adults. This year, for the first time ever, half of Americans living with HIV are 50 years old and older. For many of them, like Michael Hawkins of New Britain, Connecticut, life presents a unique set of challenges, including increased social isolation. I visited Hawkins recently to learn how he's been coping with HIV. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Alzheimer’s Association says about five million people in the United States have some form of dementia. They expect that number to increase dramatically as baby boomers age and more people live longer. By 2050, we can expect that number to rise to about a million new diagnoses every year.

Unless things change, many of us will end up in nursing homes.

Office of Gov. Malloy

Governor Dannel Malloy announced on Wednesday that he intends to nominate Waterford State Representative Betsy Ritter to be the state's next commissioner of the State Department on Aging.

It's one of the worst fears we have for our parents or for ourselves: that we, or they, will end up in a nursing home, drugged into a stupor. And that fear is not entirely unreasonable. Almost 300,000 nursing home residents are currently receiving antipsychotic drugs, usually to suppress the anxiety or aggression that can go with Alzheimer's disease and other dementia.

Chion Wolf

I got interested in this topic last year when the Yale Medical School got a $10 million Blavatnik grant for more work in the specific area of  Immunobiology.

sima dimitric / Creative Commons

A new report from the Institute of Medicine takes a closer look at end-of-life care in the U.S. The report, called "Dying in America", shines light on the quality of care available to those nearing the end of life -- offering some recommendations on how to make care more sustainable and accessible to patients and their families. 

An 89-year-old World War II veteran, reported missing by his U.K. nursing home, has been found at the D-Day commemorations in France.

Bernard Jordan, who served in the Royal Navy during WWII, is a resident at The Pines nursing home in Hove, Sussex, reports the BBC. He had previously attended the 50th and 60th memorial services in Normandy.

Saying Goodbye at the Nursing Home

Jun 3, 2014
Ari Bakker / Creative Commons

My meeting can’t wait
so I’ve kissed the top of your head,
both cheeks
and like the Eskimos do.

Steven Depolo / Creative Commons

After decades of stagnant incomes, the inability to save, and disappearing pensions, 75 percent of Americans nearing retirement have less than $30,000 saved, which won’t last long. One third of Connecticut residents are baby boomers -- a big demographic that is headed straight towards retirement. In fact, Connecticut’s population of 65 and up is growing ten times faster than the general population.

Steven Depolo / Creative Commons

After decades of stagnant incomes, the inability to save, and disappearing pensions, 75 percent of Americans nearing retirement have less than $30,000 saved, which won’t last long. One third of Connecticut residents are baby boomers -- a big demographic that is headed straight towards retirement. In fact, Connecticut’s population of 65 and up is growing ten times faster than the general population.

Alexey Klementiev/iStock / Thinkstock

When Americans get older, two things often happen. Some are forced into a life where everyone around them is the same age, in an assisted living community when they become reliant on others for their care.

Others choose this life, retiring to the south, in a community of active seniors with no kids allowed. But what’s the impact of this kind of social isolation from those of other ages?

SSgt Brittany Jones / Creative Commons

An audit found a big mistake by the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. Twenty-three veterans in Connecticut have been living at retirement homes, and the VA has been paying for them to reside there. But according to the VA, it's only authorized to pay for skilled nursing care. Retirement homes or assisted living facilities are not covered.

A story in the Financial Times caught our eye this week. It was on foreign workers in South Korea.

The story looked at the town of Ansan, where about 7.6 percent of the population is foreign. They come from other Asian countries, as well as from Russia. Here's one of the reasons for the change in South Korea, a highly homogeneous society:

Love Maegan on Flickr Creative Commons

Because Generation X is eternally younger than the Baby Boomers, we just assumed they’d be eternally young. But a person born in 1965 turns 50 in two more years. Generation X somehow went gliding into mid-life without the rest of us noticing.

And, Gen-X’ers would say that's pretty typical, that they’ve never been part of anyone else’s plans from the time in their childhood when their parents got divorced and went spiraling off into personal reboot mode, leaving the kids to fend for themselves.

The New Middle Age

Aug 21, 2013

They were gutted by the economy, saddled with existential angst, and on today's Colin McEnroe Show, a few Generation Xers tweeted us about what it's like to live in a world inherited from the Baby Boomers. Our idea to dedicate a whole show to Generation X started with a great article. (Wasn't Matt Dillon's hair delightful?)

Tim Parkinson on Flickr Creative Commons

When Americans get older, two things often happen.

Some are forced into a life where everyone around them is the same age, in an assisted living community when they become reliant on others for their care.

Others choose this life, retirement to the South, in a community of active seniors with no kids allowed.

But what’s the impact of this kind of social isolation from those of other ages?  What benefits are they missing?

Dru Nadler

Coastal towns in Connecticut are already gearing up for another hurricane season less than a month away. This is the second of a three-part series examining vulnerable areas on Connecticut's shore. (Read more in the Connecticut Mirror here.)

Yesterday I visited Morris Cove, one of New Haven’s most desirable neighborhoods right on Long Island Sound. Now, we head to a very different residential area on Connecticut’s coastline.

Sarah.249 on Flickr Creative Commons

America is getting older and Connecticut is growing grayer faster than almost every other state.

The first batch of baby boomers hit 65 in 2011, and Connecticut’s over-65 population is expected to grow by more than 64% by the time the last batch turns 65 in 2029.  When they retire, here’s what we’re looking at: A smaller and less skilled pool of workers to replace them.

But don’t expect this new group of seniors to just retire all at once; they’ll be working longer, in part because they want to, but also to rebuild those nest eggs smashed during the recession.

Basykes from Flickr Creative Commons

A Connecticut Health Investigative Team review of federal nursing home data from December finds a high use of antipsychotic medication in elderly residents not diagnosed with psychosis.

While these drugs are an important form of treatment for patients with certain psychiatric conditions, such as schizophrenia, their "off label" use to calm agitated patients can cause dangerous side effects, particularly for elderly patients with dementia.

Brunosan, Flickr Creative Commons

As the brain ages, it becomes harder to know when its time to move from one task to the next. That’s according to a new study by Yale University researchers, who say understanding how the brain ages may help an older workforce.

The study is called Lost in Transition. Mark Laubach, an associate professor at the Yale School of Medicine, came up with the title after waiting to buy a ticket at the Washington, DC train station. He was anxious to get back to Connecticut to see his son play in his first Little League game.  

hweiling, creative commons

The numbers don’t do justice to the scope of Alzheimers Disease.

Photo by Kevin Briody (Flickr)

A recent rash of accidents involving elderly drivers in Connecticut has state lawmakers, law enforcement and senior advocates again looking at the tricky issues that concern senior drivers.

Joining us by phone is Jennifer Millea, she is the Communications Director for AARP - Connecticut.

joiseyshowaa

Connecticut Magazine editor Charlie Monagan's new musical based on real events in Waterbury, Connecticut. And, big news -- a new hospice facility is about to be built on the east end of Long Island. Plus, Yale law professor Stephen Carter talks about his latest novel Jericho's Fall.

Nate Ferdinandt

An emotional debate concerning proposed changes to regulations governing nonprofit hospice care. We look at what those changes would mean for the patients.

creative common; Adam Jones, Ph.D.

As life expectancy in the United States continues to rise, the maintenance of physical independence among older Americans has emerged as a major clinical and public health priority.  The ability to move without assistance, is a fundamental feature of human functioning. Older people who lose mobility are less likely to remain in the community, have higher rates of morbidity, mortality, and hospitalizations and experience a poorer quality of life.