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disabilities

Ray Hardman / WNPR

When the famous Austrian pianist Paul Wittgenstein lost his right arm in World War I, composers lined up to write works for the pianist featuring the left hand only. One of those works, Maurice Ravel's "Piano Concerto for the Left Hand," will be performed this Sunday by the West Hartford Symphony Orchestra. The soloist for that performance lost the use of his right hand in an unthinkable family tragedy.

Jackson Mitchell / WNPR

An athletic facilities director at Sacred Heart University is alleging that he was unfairly fired after he told the school -- in the interest of full disclosure -- that he’d been diagnosed with dementia. 

Governor Dannel Malloy’s administration recently announced plans to privatize 40 state-run group homes and other services for people with developmental disabilities. The move has prompted legal action and emotional pleas from family members.

Nolan Williamson / Creative Commons

A new survey of state workers in Connecticut focuses on the experiences of state employees with disabilities.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Photographer Christopher Capozziello started taking pictures of his brother Nick before he was a professional photographer. The pictures became a way to deal with having a twin brother who suffers in ways Chris does not.  

Diane Sobolewski / Goodspeed Musicals

Broadway musicals are, by design, a feast for the senses. But for many people on the autism spectrum, the bright lights, loud music, and lavish costumes can cause sensory overload.

Uncle Goose / Flickr

A transcript of this show is available here.

It's hard to think about language as being endangered or replaceable. But as our culture and means of communication evolve, certain languages find their utility in decline. Braille and sign language are in just such a predicament.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy's administration has announced plans to privatize dozens of group homes for the developmentally disabled in Connecticut.

Petteri Sulonen / Creative Commons

The state will no longer be providing sign language interpreters. State officials have laid off more than two dozen interpreters in an effort to close the budget deficit.

As the population of people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder keeps growing, so does the number of people with that diagnosis who aren't finding employment.

Though many young adults on the spectrum are considered high functioning, recent research shows 40 percent don't find work — a higher jobless rate than people with other developmental disabilities experience.

Ugly Dolls / Flickr Creative Commons

What does it mean to say that someone, or something, is ugly? For a label that gets tossed around so often, its meaning is hard to pin down. Perhaps that's because, throughout history and around the world, our notions of ugliness have shifted considerably.

Stefan Malmesjö / Flickr Creative Commons

It's hard to think about language as being endangered or replaceable. But as our culture and means of communication evolve, certain languages find their utility in decline. 

Uncle Goose / Flickr

A transcript of this show is available here.

It's hard to think about language as being endangered or replaceable. But as our culture and means of communication evolve, certain languages find their utility in decline. Braille and sign language are in just such a predicament.

Arc of Farmington Valley

Governor Dannel Malloy's proposal to change the traditional handicapped symbol had its first public hearing Monday in Hartford. Disability rights advocates are divided on the issue.

Facebook

Lisa Rosengrant lost her hearing when she was three. She's now a college student, and she can hear somewhat with the help of hearing aids. But she still has trouble taking notes in class.

Ugly Dolls / Flickr

What does it mean to say that someone, or something is ugly? For a label that gets tossed around so often, its meaning is hard to pin down. Perhaps that's because, throughout history and around the world, our notions of ugliness have shifted considerably.

Facebook

Advocates for the deaf are concerned that officials at Northwestern Connecticut Community College are slowly phasing out a program that helps deaf and hard-of-hearing students. But school officials claim nothing has changed.

City of Milford Adaptive Recreation / Facebook

Adaptive arts link those with disabilities to artistic expression. This Friday, the city of Milford’s Recreation Department partners with the New England Ballet Company for the sixth annual production of "The Nutcracker Suite."

Dustin Chambers / Propublica

Most of us don’t know much about Workers’ Compensation until we need it -- and your experience will depend a lot on where you live. 

Caps on benefits and higher bars to qualify as “injured” are a few of the changes made in most states beginning in the 1990’s to lower the cost of Workers’ Compensation. 

Employers say the program costs too much for them to remain competitive, and convinced legislators and unions on both sides of the aisle to reduce benefits.

On July 4, America will celebrate 239 years of independence.

Later in the month, our country will mark another historic moment: the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, a law passed on July 26, 1990, that guarantees certain rights — and increased independence — to our compatriots with physical and intellectual disabilities.

In this era of ramps and lifts and other hallmarks of accessible design, it's sometimes hard to remember that not too long ago inaccessibility was the norm. And barriers abounded.

Dustin Chambers / ProPublica

Most of us don’t know much about Workers’ Compensation until we need it - and your experience will depend a lot on where you live. 

Caps on benefits and higher bars to qualify as “injured” are a few of the changes made in most states beginning in the 1990’s to lower the cost of Workers’ Compensation. 

Employers say the program costs too much for them to remain competitive, and convinced legislators and unions on both sides of the aisle to reduce benefits. 

It's a warning sign at art museums around the world: "Don't touch the artwork."

But Spain's famous Prado Museum is changing that, with an exhibit where visitors are not only allowed to touch the paintings — they're encouraged to do so.

The Prado has made 3-D copies of some of the most renowned works in its collection — including those by Francisco Goya, Diego Velazquez and El Greco — to allow blind people to feel them.

It's a special exhibit for those who normally can't enjoy paintings.

WNPR/Ryan King

Robert Noll’s job is pretty simple. As a contractor for MARC Industries in Manchester, Noll screws nuts onto U-bolts that are used to install pipes and sprinkler systems.

But he's visually and intellectually disabled, so performing this task efficiently is sometimes a problem. 

Jim Michaud / Journal Inquirer

The Connecticut Supreme Court has ordered a new trial for a brain-damaged man sentenced to life in prison for the 1987 killing of his wife's 88-year-old grandmother.

The high court released the four-to-two ruling Tuesday, saying 69-year-old Richard Lapointe was deprived of a fair trial because prosecutors failed to disclose notes by a police officer that may have supported an alibi defense.

Vancouver Film School / Creative Commons

Should all Connecticut teachers get more special education training? 

The idea has been put on the table by a group of educators, lawmakers and other professionals, with a goal to help teachers identify students with disabilities earlier, so that they don't fall behind in class or develop behavior problems.

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