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crime

Screenshot / WGBH

Governor Dannel Malloy’s “Second Chance Society” has reduced prison population numbers and streamlined aspects of the parole process in Connecticut. Today, about 5,000 people are supervised by parole in the state, but about a third of all parolees violate terms of their release and end up back behind bars.

AKZOphoto / Flickr

There is perhaps no figure more emblematic of the paranormal than the psychic. Able to predict the future, see into the past, and even communicate with the dead, the psychic's awesome gifts are matched only by his or her ability to withstand skepticism and ridicule.

James Monteiro

To Sokeo Ros, dance is more than an art form. It’s a catalyst for change; a means of self-discovery. 

Paul Bass / New Haven Independent

New Haven's new police chief was officially sworn in at a ceremony at City Hall Tuesday evening. Anthony Campbell took over as interim police chief after the controversial former Chief Dean Esserman resigned last fall. In May, New Haven Mayor Toni Harp announced that Campbell would stay on in the position permanently.

NIH / Creative Commons

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a social disability that leaves the autistic isolated and confused in a world in which they can't understand the social cues others take for granted. To compensate, some use the internet as a way to learn about sexuality that non-autistic people learn about through relationships. 

Treason!

Jun 7, 2017
David / Flickr

Of all the crimes defined by law, only one is mentioned in the U.S. Constitution: Treason! This distinction, however, was not meant to deter dissent, but rather to protect it. Knowing well how England had levied the charge against those whose voices they found subversive, our founders sought to ensure the citizens of their newly formed nation would always be free to disagree with the government.

Lukascb / Creative Commons

A key group organized in response to clergy sex abuse in the Diocese of Bridgeport has disbanded.

Frank Grace / Flickr

The eugenics movement of the early 20th century is a dark chapter in our nation's history. And while we may think of it as a practice we've long since abandoned, the truth is a bit more complicated.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez has lost his latest legal battle, as a state appellate court dismissed an appeal he brought before it, and he's now asking the state Supreme Court to intervene. 

Jhonatas Jesus Silva / Flickr

Of the many strange behaviors we humans have engaged in, few seem more abhorrent than cannibalism. But the act of feasting on another human's flesh cannot be so easily dismissed as simply disgusting or deviant. Freud, in fact,  believed cannibalism played a role in the birth of religion itself.

Paul Bass / New Haven Independent

New Haven Mayor Toni Harp has selected interim police Chief Anthony Campbell to take over permanently starting June 1. Campbell took over on an interim basis back in September after former Chief Dean Esserman stepped down. Esserman is credited with bringing crime down in the Elm City, but a number of erratic public incidents prompted Harp to ask for his resignation.

A Massachusetts judge has thrown out the murder conviction of Aaron Hernandez because the former NFL star died in prison before his appeal could be heard. The ruling comes nearly three weeks after Hernandez killed himself.

Vector Portal / Creative Commons

Al Capone told everyone who asked him what he did for a living that he was a "property owner and taxpayer in Chicago." He was really a powerful multimillionaire in 1920s Chicago who made money from the illegal sale of alcohol during Prohibition and the vices that usually accompanied it: gambling and prostitution.

Lori Mack/WNPR

Representatives from religious, cultural, and civil rights organizations met with law enforcement in New Haven on Monday to discuss hate crimes. Members of 17 organizations participated in a training session where they viewed a film on what to do in the case of an active shooter scenario and how to respond to bomb threats.

Massachusetts formally dropped more than 21,000 tainted drug convictions Thursday that were linked to a disgraced state chemist who in 2013 admitted to faking test results.

It's the largest single dismissal of convictions in U.S. history, according to the American Civil Liberties Union.

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