WNPR

Connecticut

The American Cancer Society says Connecticut is one of two states that has not provided funding for tobacco prevention from money received from a 1990s settlement between the tobacco industry and 46 states.

Photo Phiend / Creative Commons

Lawmakers in Hartford still have no state budget in place — and that’s creating widespread fiscal uncertainty for cities and towns across Connecticut.

This hour, we hear from municipal leaders about how they’re responding. 

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

New Haven’s professional soccer team, the Elm City Express, has made it to its league’s championship game in its inaugural year, after beating a team from Oakland on Saturday.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Coming up, we find out how New Haven's new Elm City Party Bike is motivating some to pedal for their beer.

But first, members of the Hartford-based, '90s-inspired rock band Audio Jane join us live in WNPR’s Studio 3.

We talk about their local roots and listen to songs off their 2017 release -- an album called Naive

Courtesty Timothy Cohn

During the 1920’s, some Connecticut women took jobs painting watch dials with radium-laced paint. At the time, they didn’t know it was toxic. As these so-called “Radium Girls” began to die, their stories became part of a rallying cry for industrial regulation.

This hour, we talk about the "Radium Girls" of Waterbury with Kate Moore, author of The Radium Girls: The Dark Story Of America’s Shining Women

Maisa Tisdale

Within the shadow of P.T. Barnum lies a much quieter tale of Bridgeport prosperity -- a tale involving two nineteenth-century sisters, Mary and Eliza Freeman.

While neither achieved the same level of recognition as Barnum, both established a significant place within the history of Connecticut’s Park City. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A New Fairfield man ordered to be deported to his native Guatemala says he could be at risk of violence or kidnapping if he returns. Joel Colindres came to the United States illegally in 2004. He married a U.S. citizen in 2010 and they have two young children.

Ed Suominen / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection is going public with updates to a plan it hopes will reduce carbon emissions and increase supplies of renewable energy.

Frédérique Voisin-Demery / Creative Commons

Many of us take it for granted that much of our food comes from seeds. But did you know 94% of our seed varieties have disappeared in the last century?

This hour, we talk with the co-director of the documentary SEED: The Untold Story. We find out how we lost a wealth of seed diversity and we learn about seed savers who are working to bring that diversity back.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The Commissioner of Connecticut’s Department of Transportation says in the wake of the controversy over a proposed new rail bypass, he’s focusing on repairing the existing system to improve service. 

Daniel X. O'Neil / Creative Commons

Justice for all? Or justice for the privileged?

This hour, we hear how one Connecticut-based incubator is helping vulnerable residents gain access to counsel. We also examine more wide-ranging efforts to narrow the country’s “justice gap.” 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

State officials announced on Monday the operator of a new commuter rail line between New Haven and Springfield, and said the launch of that service will be delayed into mid-2018.

Jeffrey Beall / Wikimedia Commons

Former University of Connecticut quarterback Dan Orlovsky is going back to the National Football League for a 13th season.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Institute for Municipal and Regional Policy has released a follow-up to last year's report looking at traffic stop data and racial profiling in Connecticut.

SBSTNC / Creative Commons

Chuck Collins is a senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies. He's also an author, an editor, and a child of the so-called “one percent."

This hour, we sit down with Collins. We talk about his latest book and preview his upcoming appearance in Winsted, Connecticut. 

Pages