WNPR

Connecticut Garden Journal

mwms1916 (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Being an Italian-American, I'd like to think I know something about lasagna. Hey, I’ve been eating it since I was a little bambino. While lasagna is great for eating, it’s also a good gardening idea. Let me explain.

Tom Gill / Creative Commons

Most of the vegetables I grow are primarily for eating. Some may be beautiful too, but if you can't eat it, I'm not interested. The exception is gourds. 

Mark / Creative Commons

Growing up an Italian-American in Waterbury, I have fond memories of my mom canning tomatoes in late summer. It always seemed to be a hot day when she canned and her boiling water bath just added to the stickiness in the air. But those tasty canned tomatoes made for great sauce all winter.

Men In Black / Creative Commons

I call this the golden time of year in the garden. Goldenrods and sunflowers are peaking. But the plant that really shines in late-summer is rudbeckia or black-eyed Susan. 

Ryan Wightman / Creative Commons

This native wildflower is often overlooked as a garden plant. 

Rachel Paxton / Creative Commons

It was a slow start to the melon and watermelon season. Cool, rainy spring weather delayed planting and early growth, but now they're coming on strong.

Renee / Creative Commons

Some plant common names can steer you in the wrong direction. Take Rose of Sharon for example. 

ilovebutter / Creative Commons

With the zucchinis coming on hot and heavy and winter squash not far behind, you might welcome some insects that prey on these cucurbits. But while squash can be overly abundant, I'd never wish squash bugs or squash vine borers on any gardener.

K M / Creative Commons

I love seeing those tropical hibiscus flowers in warm regions such as Florida. The flowers are big and colorful and plants like small shrubs. We obviously can't grow them outdoors in our New England climate, but we can grow a similar relative.

Scot Nelson / Creative Commons

Ahh, the dog days of summer. This time of year you can almost see the corn, melons, and tomato plants growing. But along with all this lush growth comes problems, especially with tomatoes.

Jane / Creative Commons

We often get wowed in late spring and early summer with all the colorful flowering shrubs. Lilacs, spirea, rhododendron, mountain laurel, and weigela are just some of the beautiful shrubs that burst into color in May and June. But come July and August, our shrub borders often just look green.

Sergey G / Creative Commons

This pest is native to the Southwest United States but has spread and become a worldwide problem for anyone growing potatoes. It's the Colorado potato beetle. 

Baker County Tourism / Creative Commons

We think of peaches as a special summer treat from Georgia or New Jersey, but they were originally grown in China and can be grown in Connecticut. 

FarOutFlora / Creative Commons

This stately perennial has white, pink, blue, or purple flower buds that ancient Greeks called delphis or dolphin. They thought the flower buds resemble Flipper. We know theses plants as delphiniums.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Although I grew up in Waterbury with a big veggie garden in the backyard, my first foray into gardening as an adult was in a community garden. 

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