WNPR

Connecticut Garden Journal

Joshua Mayer / Creative Commons

With colder weather upon us, everyone is looking for a warm place to spend the winter, including some insects.

brx0 / Creative Commons

Although we've had an incredible autumn so far, the end is near. With temperatures predicted to dip into the low 20s soon, it's time to protect tender plants you want to save for next year.

woodleywonderworks / Creative Commons

This time of year it's easy to pull out the remaining veggies, cut back your perennial flowers, clean out containers, clap your hands and say, “That's it, I'm done!” 

Michael/Hello Turkey Toe / Creative Commons

This extended warm, fall weather has me appreciating late blooming perennial flowers. Certainly we're all familiar with asters, sedums, and chrysanthemums, but one that has more recently shown up on my radar is the Montauk daisy. 

Jesse Palmer / Creative Commons

October is a time of apples, corn stalks, Halloween, and jack-o’-lanterns. Visit a local farm stand now to pick out your pumpkin for carving. But instead of making a jack-o’-lantern this year, try making a jack-o’-plantern?

Plant Chicago / Creative Commons

I'm always looking for unusual ways to grow gardens. One technique I stumbled upon has been used in Germany and Eastern Europe for hundreds of years. It's called hugelkultur.

Seacoast Eat Local / Creative Commons

With the cool weather and short days of October, thoughts often go towards pumpkins and winter squash.

Natalia Wilson / Creative Commons

With all the hot weather this week, it's hard to think about planting for spring. Heck, I'm still swimming! But October is bulb planting time and one of the beauties is the crocus.

mwms1916 (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Being an Italian-American, I'd like to think I know something about lasagna. Hey, I’ve been eating it since I was a little bambino. While lasagna is great for eating, it’s also a good gardening idea. Let me explain.

Tom Gill / Creative Commons

Most of the vegetables I grow are primarily for eating. Some may be beautiful too, but if you can't eat it, I'm not interested. The exception is gourds. 

Mark / Creative Commons

Growing up an Italian-American in Waterbury, I have fond memories of my mom canning tomatoes in late summer. It always seemed to be a hot day when she canned and her boiling water bath just added to the stickiness in the air. But those tasty canned tomatoes made for great sauce all winter.

Men In Black / Creative Commons

I call this the golden time of year in the garden. Goldenrods and sunflowers are peaking. But the plant that really shines in late-summer is rudbeckia or black-eyed Susan. 

Ryan Wightman / Creative Commons

This native wildflower is often overlooked as a garden plant. 

Rachel Paxton / Creative Commons

It was a slow start to the melon and watermelon season. Cool, rainy spring weather delayed planting and early growth, but now they're coming on strong.

Renee / Creative Commons

Some plant common names can steer you in the wrong direction. Take Rose of Sharon for example. 

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