WNPR

Connecticut Garden Journal

isaac'licious (Flickr) / Creative Commons

I love growing ethnic vegetables such as the vining Italian trombocino squash or small, hot South American peppers. But when I say Asian greens, many gardeners think of Chinese cabbage and bok choy. But there are other unusual Asian greens that add spice and beauty to a meal. Here are some of my favorites.

Ashbridge Studios (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Ahh, the big floral holiday is almost upon us. Valentine's Day is one of the biggest flower-giving days of the year. It's estimated more than 250 million roses are sold on this day alone, traveling from as far away as Chile. And while roses are thought of as the go-to Valentine's Day flower, there are other blooms that make nice alternatives to the rose.

Miroslav Becvar (Flickr) / Creative Commons

We've all heard about the plight of our pollinating insects. Whether it be honey bee population crashes or concerns about native bees, pollinators are struggling with diseases, climate change, and habitat loss.

Sarah-Rose (Flickr) / Creative Commons

More and more gardeners are having to deal with shade in their yards from buildings and large trees. But shade doesn't mean the end of gardening. Here's some basics on shade gardening.

JR P (Flickr) / Creative Commons

With an already long feeling winter -- and it's still January -- it's a good time to plan your flower gardens. One design that everyone loves is the English cottage garden.

Cordelia (Flickr) / Creative Commons

This time of year we're all starved for color indoors. But there's one houseplant that can brighten up your day and is found in grocery stores to home centers.

Carol Moshier / Creative Commons

With all this cold weather I find myself sitting by a fire with tea and homemade Italian pignoli cookies, while imagining the summer garden. But it's more than just dreaming. I'm placing my seed order and have found some new vegetable varieties to try.

scrappy annie (Flickr) / Creative Commons

With the holidays behind us, many are cleaning up after all the gift giving. Like many gifts, some are worth saving and others are better regifted. This is also true of those holiday plants. Let's look at those plants worth saving and those best composted.

Scott Jungling / Creative Commons

Happy winter solstice. It only gets brighter from now until summer! We're not the only ones who will enjoy the longer days. Herbs can be grown indoors to be added to recipes, drinks, and provide some greenery in winter. Here are the best ones to grow.

Alasam / Creative Commons

One of the fruits of winter is citrus. Unfortunately, we're relegated to buying them in grocery stores or ordering cases of oranges, grapefruits, and lemons from Florida or California.

Will Keightley / Creative Commons

You see the signs all around the state. Live Christmas trees for sale. They're beautiful, providing an old fashioned charm to our homes for the holidays. Some, such as balsam fir, have a woodsy smell, while others, such as blue spruce have a blue tinge.

Nannette Turner / Creative Commons

Oh, by gosh by golly, it's time for mistletoe and holly. Yes, holly shrubs are embedded in our holiday traditions and have a rich history.

Ken Slade / Creative Commons

It's a time of gratefulness and I've been appreciating oak trees lately.

Joshua Mayer / Creative Commons

With colder weather upon us, everyone is looking for a warm place to spend the winter, including some insects.

brx0 / Creative Commons

Although we've had an incredible autumn so far, the end is near. With temperatures predicted to dip into the low 20s soon, it's time to protect tender plants you want to save for next year.

Pages