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Ryan Caron King / WNPR

One week has passed since Republican Donald Trump was elected to become the 45th president of the United States. In that time, thousands of immigrants and activists have come together to protest the new President-elect, citing, among other things, Trump's proposals on immigration. 

Steve Johnson / Creative Commons

Connecticut is in a drought. But what does that mean for the state’s water resources? This hour, we follow up on the controversy surrounding Bloomfield’s new Niagara Bottling facility.

The California-based company will be allowed to bottle millions, if not billions, of gallons of public water -- something critics warn against due to recent climate trends. Coming up, we take a closer look. 

To Catch a Burglar

Nov 2, 2016
Robert Martin / Creative Commons

George Leonidas Leslie robbed the Manhattan Savings Institution of $3 million in 1878. At the time, it was considered one of the safest buildings in the world. He made detailed models of the bank and its vault from blueprints he charmed from a bank employee. 

Jameziecakes / Creative Commons

Public school superintendents in the state’s three largest cities — Bridgeport, New Haven and Hartford — have all recently announced their resignations.

This hour, we look at superintendent turnover in Connecticut.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin is continuing his effort to highlight the capital city's structural financial problems. And he's giving state lawmakers a few suggestions on how to fix them. 

The mayor of Connecticut’s largest city says he balanced the city’s budget within the first six months of his term. Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim says he did this by selling land and collecting overdue taxes, among other things.

Ganim says he inherited a $20 million budget deficit from his predecessor Bill Finch. Ganim is a former mayor and ex-convict. He defeated Finch in a heated primary last year. Av Harris, Ganim’s spokesperson, alleges Finch didn’t tell Ganim about the deficit.

Bicycles are a type of vehicle so they belong on the road, right?

This is how the wheels turn in places such as New York City and San Francisco, where bicyclists older than age 13 are banned from riding on the sidewalk. Similar laws exist in many cities and towns throughout the country, such as Columbus, Ohio, and Chapel Hill, N.C.

That's not the case everywhere, though. In Boston and Washington, D.C., sidewalk cycling is allowed — with the exception of the downtown areas. But just because bicyclists are allowed to ride on the sidewalk doesn't mean they are welcome there.

church_0.jpg
Bobby Allyn

Developer Leo Voloshin is standing in front of an empty church in Philadelphia’s trendy Fishtown neighborhood.

“It has tall majestic spires. It has a beautiful green patina,” Voloshin said. “The church is just awe-inspiring.”

The 1880s church, St. Laurentious, the oldest Polish church in the city, has been sitting unused since 2013.

“You walk in and look up and the baby-blue ceiling is really just brings it all to life,” he said.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

David Dunn runs hiring for the city of Bridgeport, Connecticut, where he was born and raised, and for years, there's been a consistent complaint.

"Certainly for the last decade there has been a good deal of criticism from the community [and] a number of community-based organizations that our police department was not reflective of the community as a whole," Dunn said.

Ask WNPR!

Oct 4, 2016
Ask WNPR
Todd Gray / CPBN

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David Dunn runs hiring for the city of Bridgeport, Conn., where he was born and raised, and, for years, there's been a consistent complaint.

"Certainly for the last decade there has been a good deal of criticism from the community [and] a number of community-based organizations that our police department was not reflective of the community as a whole."

The 18-year-old Jane Jacobs picked a lousy time to leave her hometown of Scranton, Pa., and move to New York City.

It was the fall of 1934 and New York was dragging itself through The Great Depression. During that first year in the city, Jacobs, who'd gone to secretarial school, scrounged for work, riding the subway from the Brooklyn apartment she shared with her older sister, Betty, into Manhattan.

Bristol's Operation Traffic Box art project is back in business. 

Earlier this week, the city's board of police commissioners voted four to three to halt the public art project, where volunteer artists from Bristol transform large traffic boxes into works of art.

The hum of textile looms once filled the 19th-century mill buildings throughout downtown Lawrence. Immigrant workers from Ireland and Germany were among some of the first laborers.

Today, many of the mill buildings in Lawrence are home to refurbished work spaces — buzzing with the sounds of artists, innovators and entrepreneurs like Angie Jimenez, who is arranging pots and pans in the site of her future cooking classroom.

Aaron Mentele / Flickr

The modern circus has been thrilling audiences for over 250 years, but as times have changed, so has the circus. What began as little more than an equestrian performance has come to include clowns, trapeze artists and even lion tamers.

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