WNPR

budgets

Pixabay / Creative Commons

Connecticut has spent over $50 million helping schools beef up security since 2013. Some of that money -- $3.2 million -- has gone to private schools, which are reimbursed at a higher rate than many public schools.

Connecticut Department of Transportation Commissioner James Redeker
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Two months after the state Department of Transportation halted more than 400 road projects in Connecticut because of budget issues, there’s still no resolution in sight.

Emily Stanchfield / Creative Commons

Tuesday marked the 20th anniversary of the shooting rampage at the state lottery headquarters in Newington. The horrific event prompted the passage of the state’s so-called “risk warrant” law allowing police to temporarily seize weapons from those deemed a threat to themselves or others.

Bossi / Creative Commons

In the past decade, the amount of money that students owe for education has more than doubled to almost $1.4 trillion, and tuition for college has increased nearly 400 percent in the last 30 years. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Much of state lawmakers’ budget-crafting in recent years has focused on cutting spending. Any proposals to raise revenue through new or expanded taxes are almost instantly decried as anti-business in a state increasingly hurting for business. 

Connecticut State Capitol
Jim Bowen / Creative Commons

Legislators convened in Hartford Tuesday to decry a budget sweep, which took tens of millions of dollars out of energy efficiency programs and swept it into the state's general fund.

Updated at 9:07 a.m. ET

President Trump signed a bipartisan budget agreement Friday morning, following approval of the bill in Congress shortly before sunrise.

The two-year spending pact will let lawmakers spend $300 billion more than current law allows.

The deal suspends a 2011 budget law championed by conservatives that set hard caps on discretionary spending and included an automatic trigger known as "sequester" cuts if Congress attempted to bust those spending caps.

Office of Governor Dan Malloy / Flickr

Governor Dannel Malloy set the tone of his final State of the State address Wednesday when he said early in his speech that rather than talk about the budget, he would discuss “something that is a simple concept, but also a bold aspiration.”

Andy Fleischmann - State Representative for West Hartford and Co-Chair of the CT General Assembly Education Committee.
Chion Wolf / WNPR

The state Supreme Court ruled last month that the way Connecticut funds public schools doesn’t violate the state’s constitution.

Updated at 4:52 p.m. ET

Senate leaders reached a bipartisan budget agreement to increase military and domestic spending levels for two years, paving the way for the first long-term spending pact since President Trump took office.

The White House and House Speaker Paul Ryan quickly declared support for the pact, helping pave the way for its passage by the end of the week, despite opposition from fiscal hawks and liberal Democrats.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy avoided the state’s fiscal problems and instead focused on big policy goals as he gave his last State of the State address at the start of the General Assembly’s legislative session. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

At noon on Wednesday, Governor Dannel Malloy is delivering his final budget address to the Connecticut General Assembly. He’s already leaked a large part of what he would like to do: cut state aid to certain rich towns, lend a hand to Connecticut taxpayers hurt by the federal tax changes, and make it more expensive to drive on state highways, so we can afford to fix them. 

Updated at 6:57 p.m. ET

The House passed a bill Tuesday evening to avert a government shutdown on Thursday, as Senate leaders still hope to clear the way for years of budget harmony this week with a long-term spending agreement.

But as Congress worked on keeping things running, President Trump made a fresh call to shut down the government over immigration.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy has unveiled his proposals to close Connecticut’s latest budget gap, and improve the state’s fiscal outlook in coming years. But it appears his ideas may face opposition in the legislature as the new session gets underway.

Pages