WNPR

Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Reach us when we're live at (860) 275-7266.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at (860) 275-7272.

Contact the senior producer:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Cross-Cultural "Oops"

Apr 11, 2011
Kenneth Lu / Creative Commons

So we keep hearing that we’re a “global society.”  But that can lead to some big gaps in cultural understanding. 

Today we talk to international businesspeople, consultants, and bi-lingual Americans who have learned how to negotiate across cultures…a necessity in a world where we’re all connected, but all communicate very differently.  

But even the most seasoned multi-cultural travelers can tell of laughable faux-pas and huge business deals gone sour, over mere misunderstandings.

There’s a midnight deadline.  If a deal between lawmakers and the White House can’t be struck, the federal government shuts down.

And the next question is…does it matter?  We’re being assured that even in shut-down mode, our mail still gets delivered, entitlement benefits will still be paid, the military will keep fighting on three fronts. 

But other services you count on from the government are still kind of up in the air.  That expedited passport for the surprise Caribbean cruise?  The big tax refund you were planning on to pay for said cruise?

Elvert Barnes, Creative Commons

For years, we’ve been hearing about the chronic struggles of newspapers and the proliferation of so called “new media” sources of journalism.  

As one outcome of this change, the traditional competition for stories between papers has given way to a new era of cooperation. By pooling resources and working together, these upstarts are making a real impact, informing the community, and driving the discussion in collaboration with newspapers.  

Today we continue our series of conversations recorded at a conference called “Lifting the Veil: Journalism Uncovered.”

Roots of Prejudice

Apr 6, 2011
Linda, Creative Commons

Prejudice is one of the more troubling and baffling aspects of human nature

It has been the subject of scientific study for years.  But while social psychologists have learned a great deal about attitudes and societal influences that cause intergroup conflict, little effort has been devoted to understanding how adult humans come to have these biases in the first place.  So a Yale study set out to discover the roots of human prejudice, by studying groups of rhesus monkeys.

John Ryan Recabar

Today we talk with Palestinian physician Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish. In 2009 during Israel’s invasion and bombardment of Gaza, a rocket hit his house killing three of his daughters and his niece. Author of “I Shall Not Hate,” Abuelaish has devoted his life to reconciliation between Israelis and Palestinians.

In New London, a house tells the story of slavery, race and abolition. 

Multi-media artist Judy Dworin’s new work “In This House” is inspired by the Joshua Hempstead House in New London. 

The home has a legacy as a place where a slave was kept – now it sits in the middle of a neighborhood where African Americans and Hispanics live.  We’ll talk to Dworin and her collaborators about the house’s history, and what it tells us about Connecticut.

So, these three Governors walk into a town hall meeting.  One’s a member of the tea party, one is Mario Cuomo’s kid, and the third guy’s wearing a green tie.

I think I’m telling this wrong. The joke’s also supposed to include something about a labor department mural in Maine, and the terms “shared sacrifice” and “transformational.” 

The new Governors across our region are all facing big budgetary challenges, and they’re handling them in very different ways.

NPR's David Folkenflik once got into a battle of words with Geraldo Rivera.  It just proves that covering the media isn't always pretty. 

His latest assignment is a perfect example: Cover the corporate meltdown of your own company...go! 

Labor, After the Fire

Mar 28, 2011
Library of Congress

On Friday’s show Governor Dannel Malloy took a hard line with state labor unions – if they don’t reach an agreement on concessions, massive layoffs are on the table.

Governor Malloy said about the possibility of layoffs: “If it’s the only option, it’s the only option to pursue.” Today we’ll get reaction from an official from the state’s employee unions.

Chion Wolf

Dannel Malloy said he’d be more open to the press – more “communicative” than the previous governor.  I guess he wasn’t kidding…

Since his budget speech, Malloy has embarked on a voyage through Connecticut towns and cities that would seem ambitious by the standards of a touring rock band. 

And like those bands, grinding it out on the road – it must be getting a bit old by now. 

Shirin Ebadi

Mar 24, 2011
jyc1, creative commons

Shirin Ebadi is an Iranian Human Rights attorney, who in 2003 was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her work on behalf of democracy and human rights - especially for women and children.  She’s speaking on the “Role of the West in Iran’s Struggle for Freedom,” this Saturday, March 26th at 6:30 at Hartford Seminary.  She’s also the headline speaker for the 2011 PeaceJam Northeast Youth Conference at Watkinson School in Hartford this weekend. 

Todd Huffman

NPR is under attack over funding, fundraising and claims of bias.  So what does the network’s Ombudsman think?

We have Alicia Shepard, NPR’s Ombudsman on Where We Live regularly to talk about journalism, and the job that NPR reporters and editors do. 

She’s leaving the network, just as NPR has become a national issue on Fox News and the butt of jokes on The Daily Show. 

Paul Cross, Creative Commons

The proposed merger of Northeast Utilities and NSTAR would create the third largest utility in the country and the largest in New England

NU of course is based in Connecticut and NStar in Massachusetts.  The companies would retain headquarters in both states, but the top executives would be in Boston.

So, what does this mean for you?

Chion Wolf

Susan Herbst is the new President of the University of Connecticut.  She says the state needs a school it can “brag on.”

Coming from the University System of Georgia, she says that’s a “Southern” code phrase for making UConn a flagship University in the mold of Michigan or Berkeley - an internationally recognized research center that has a powerful “academic brand.”

therichbrooks, creative commons

Today’s guest memorized the precise order of an entire deck of cards in one minute and forty seconds.

This supreme act of memorization earned Joshua Foer a US record for speed and a winning title at the US memory championship in 2006.  But how does his uncanny ability to memorize useless information relate to our daily blunders of lost car keys, forgotten birthdays…and the classic: “I know you just told me… but what’s your name again?!” 

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