WNPR

Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Reach us when we're live at (860) 275-7266.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at (860) 275-7272.

Contact the producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

What happens when a river fills with ice?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: following reports of abuse by staff at Connecticut’s maximum-security psychiatric unit -- news of an order separating Whiting Forensic from Connecticut Valley Hospital. 

Coming up, we discuss the significance of the split -- including what it means for the safety and oversight of patients.

Vladimir Pustovit / Creative Commons

There are many questions a young woman will face as she matures. Among them: What is her timeline for building a family? And how many kids does she expect to have?

But not all women want to become mothers. 

Till Westermayer / Flickr

For someone with food allergies, a taste of peanut butter or a bite of shellfish could be life-threatening.

Erowid Center

It’s been declared a national public health emergency. In the United States, the annual number of deaths from opioid overdose has surpassed the number of deaths during the height of the AIDS epidemic in the ‘90s.

But opioid users aren’t the only victims of this crisis. 

Jason D. Neely

This hour: the origin of the Connecticut Valley Railroad. Author and historian Max R. Miller takes “along the valley line” -- sharing stories from the railroad’s past.

But first: on the heels of last month’s devastating Amtrak derailment in Washington state -- a look at what lies ahead for the nation’s aging transportation infrastructure

Syrian American Medical Society

Syria is in its sixth year of civil war, and hundreds of thousands of Syrians have been killed in the conflict.

This hour, we talk about the medical crisis in Syria. Doctors are among those who’ve been targeted by the Syrian government. Many have left the country.

Justin Brockie / Creative Commons

Across New England, freezing temps and blizzard conditions marked an unforgiving start to 2018.

This hour, we consider the factors underlying this extreme winter weather -- including the role of global climate change. 

Arthur Caranta / Flickr

They may not look like R2D2 or BB8, but in 2018, robots are an important part of our world.

This hour we talk about ​automation—new advances in “smart” technology during a period of time that’s been dubbed the “Fourth Industrial Revolution.”

Lisa McHale

This hour: the National Football League.

Just hearing those words once beckoned vivid mental images -- scenes of athletes entertaining millions with their heroic throws and jaw-clenching tackles.

In recent years, however, the NFL's image has darkened -- clouded by concerns surrounding athlete behavior and a brain disease known as CTE. 

Fort George G. Meade Public Affairs Office Follow / Creative Commons

Make room, troops. Recently, the Boy Scouts of America unveiled a major decision -- starting this year, the organization will begin admitting girls. Yes, that’s right. Girls.

While the news has been met with applause by some, others have expressed more critical views -- including the Girl Scouts. This hour, we find out why. 

PBS

For nearly four and a half decades, Sonia Manzano was Maria -- a recurring female lead on the PBS television series "Sesame Street."

Last year, Manzano retired from the show and published a memoir. It’s called Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Long Island Sound has a new guardian of sorts. Earlier this year, biologist Bill Lucey was named soundkeeper of the Northeast estuary.

This hour, the Connecticut native stops by our studios.

We learn more about his role and talk about efforts to improve life in and around the Sound.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: the myths and realities of end-of-life treatment in the U.S.

Coming up, we learn about a recent Kaiser Health News investigation and explore the history of hospice in Connecticut.

Do you know someone who has received or is currently undergoing hospice care? How has that experience affected you, your friends, your family? 

Sheldahl / Wikimedia Commons

It's an important monthly cycle for half the world's population, yet even in 2017 many people aren’t comfortable talking about it.

This hour, why is menstruation so taboo, even though it’s a basic part of human biology?

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