WNPR

Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Reach us when we're live at (860) 275-7266.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at (860) 275-7272.

Contact producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The digital editor is Heather Brandon. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Shannon Hicks / The Newtown Bee

In their new documentary, Kim Snyder and Maria Cuomo Cole provide an eye-opening narrative of life after Sandy Hook -- the deadly mass shooting that thrust Connecticut and gun reform into the national spotlight. This hour, we sit down with the filmmakers and learn about the multi-year journey that brought "Newtown" to the screen. 

Mike Acton / Creative Commons

Twenty years ago, a lot of Icelandic teens were drinking too much. But an innovative program changed that.

This hour, we talk with the American researcher who helped combat the problem by tapping into natural highs — like sports. If the program has worked, why aren’t other countries following suit? We find out.

Sumit Chachra / Creative Commons

Recent hate crimes against Indians living in the U.S. have — again — sparked debate within South Asian communities, recalling memories of similar attacks after 9/11.

This hour, we hear reaction from Indians living in Connecticut. What’s the best way to respond to incidents of hate?

Photo courtesty of Pantone Inc.

It’s St. Paddy’s Day! And did you know the 2017 color of the year is Greenery?

This hour, we find out more from the so called Authority on Color — Pantone. Plus, Connecticut based fiddler Dan Foster joins us to play some Irish tunes for the occasion — ahead of his band's Friday evening concert in Stonington. 

AnneCN / Creative Commons

Tuesday’s winter storm packed a punch -- bringing some much-needed precipitation to Connecticut.

But was the wet weather enough to hoist the state out of a long-running drought? This hour, we find out and ask whether the region can expect to see consistent dry spells. 

Eastern Connecticut Ballet

Five-foot, ten-inch dancer Gloria Govrin reached unprecedented heights when she joined the New York City Ballet nearly six decades ago. This hour, we take an in-depth look at her groundbreaking career -- including her work under choreographer George Balanchine ("Mr. B") -- and learn about the unique opportunity that brought her to Connecticut. 

Middlebury College

A recent Gallup poll of college students found that a majority of students think that colleges shouldn’t restrict speech on campus just because some political views are controversial or unpopular. But lately, disruptive protests of controversial speakers have again brought the issue of free speech front and center. 

Creative Commons

It’s hard to read the word "mafia" and not be reminded of scenes from The Godfather or Casino.

But mafias infiltrate more than just movie plots and crime novels. Their presence is felt in states and societies across the globe.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

War and poverty displace millions of people around the world.

This hour, we hear from two Connecticut artists who have personal experience with the global refugee and migrant crisis.

Bart Everson / Creative Commons

Get the lead out -- at least, that's what Connecticut renters Rosie Gallant and Adam Golka hoped to do after discovering the toxin in their Woodstock home. This hour, we hear their story and find out how repeated lead exposure has impacted the health of their infant daughter. 

wikimedia

When we think of feminism, most people think of liberals and the Democratic party. But the Republicans were actually the first party to endorse the Equal Rights Amendment. And at that time, the GOP was more supportive of women’s right to vote than the Democratic party. 

Cliff / Creative Commons

East Windsor is one step closer to having a casino after the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribes selected the town as the site of a possible third gaming facility in Connecticut.

This hour, we ask, how will this plan transform East Windsor and the region? 

Lydia Brown / WNPR

The Syrian conflict -- will it ever end? This hour, we sit down with former U.S. Ambassador to Syria Robert Ford. We get his take on the country’s civil war and refugee crisis, and discuss the future of U.S. intervention under President Trump. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Marine Michael Zacchea had a job to do in 2004: train and lead the first Iraqi Army battalion after the U.S. disbanded the country’s military post invasion.

Spotmatik/iStock / Thinkstock

A new report from C-HIT -- the Connecticut Health Investigative Team -- looks at how emergency rooms across the state are grappling with a rising number of child mental health patients. The number is still mounting, it says, despite efforts to confront the issue by Governor Malloy and other officials. 

Shana Sureck

Social media can keep us from finding the space and time to really sit down and talk with one another. But there is one place where you can bet on a frank discussion – the barber shop.

This hour, we examine the role barber shops play in American communities – from the cities to the 'burbs.

MichaelDaugherty.net

Sixty-two-year-old Michael Daugherty is a well-known and well-decorated contemporary American composer -- recognized for such works as his Grammy Award-winning Metropolis Symphony and 2015 cello concerto Tales of Hemingway

Dannel Malloy / Creative Commons

Governor Malloy’s budget plan promises to aid struggling cities, but many towns are concerned about footing more of the bill.

This hour, we ask municipal leaders and lawmakers about Malloy’s budget proposal and we want to hear from you. 

The Ethel Walker School

In a world of buzzing smartphones, endless meetings and persistent deadlines, how can we be more in-tune with ourselves and more creative in our endeavors?

US Department of Education / Creative Commons

Billionaire Betsy DeVos is the new Secretary for the US Department of Education.

This hour, how will she impact public school education nationwide including here in Connecticut? We hear from educators within traditional public and charter schools — and we want to hear from you, too.

Luis Pérez / Creative Commons

From self-service menus to self-driving cars to... androids around the water cooler? This hour, we explore the past, present, and future of workforce automation. 

Photo courtesy of Lisa Fukui

President Trump’s executive order on immigration and talk of a Muslim registry during his campaign re-ignited memories of World War II, when the country sent Japanese-Americans to internment camps.

This hour, we revisit this history and learn why the University of Connecticut opened up its campus to some young internees.

Digital Vision / Thinkstock

This hour: breakthroughs in brain science.

Coming up, we take a look inside the minds of so-called "superagers" -- older adults whose brains are not only challenging the hands of time, but also raising some big questions within the scientific community. What are some of the best tips and tricks to keep your brain young and healthy? We take a closer look. 

Martin Svedén / Flickr Creative Commons

A tree’s roots touch more than just soil. They reach into the recesses of our past; into our culture and our traditions. It's something Fiona Stafford writes about in her new book The Long, Long Life of Trees. This hour, we sit down with the author. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

African Americans are a diverse group of people who live in our cities and our suburbs.

This hour, what does it mean to be black in Connecticut?

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