WNPR

Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Reach us when we're live at (860) 275-7266.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at (860) 275-7272.

Contact producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The digital editor is Heather Brandon. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Shana Sureck

Social media can keep us from finding the space and time to really sit down and talk with one another. But there is one place where you can bet on a frank discussion – the barber shop.

This hour, we examine the role barber shops play in American communities – from the cities to the 'burbs.

MichaelDaugherty.net

Sixty-two-year-old Michael Daugherty is a well-known and well-decorated contemporary American composer -- recognized for such works as his Grammy Award-winning Metropolis Symphony and 2015 cello concerto Tales of Hemingway

Dannel Malloy / Creative Commons

Governor Malloy’s budget plan promises to aid struggling cities, but many towns are concerned about footing more of the bill.

This hour, we ask municipal leaders and lawmakers about Malloy’s budget proposal and we want to hear from you. 

The Ethel Walker School

In a world of buzzing smartphones, endless meetings and persistent deadlines, how can we be more in-tune with ourselves and more creative in our endeavors?

US Department of Education / Creative Commons

Billionaire Betsy DeVos is the new Secretary for the US Department of Education.

This hour, how will she impact public school education nationwide including here in Connecticut? We hear from educators within traditional public and charter schools — and we want to hear from you, too.

Luis Pérez / Creative Commons

From self-service menus to self-driving cars to... androids around the water cooler? This hour, we explore the past, present, and future of workforce automation. 

Photo courtesy of Lisa Fukui

President Trump’s executive order on immigration and talk of a Muslim registry during his campaign re-ignited memories of World War II, when the country sent Japanese-Americans to internment camps.

This hour, we revisit this history and learn why the University of Connecticut opened up its campus to some young internees.

Digital Vision / Thinkstock

This hour: breakthroughs in brain science.

Coming up, we take a look inside the minds of so-called "superagers" -- older adults whose brains are not only challenging the hands of time, but also raising some big questions within the scientific community. What are some of the best tips and tricks to keep your brain young and healthy? We take a closer look. 

Martin Svedén / Flickr Creative Commons

A tree’s roots touch more than just soil. They reach into the recesses of our past; into our culture and our traditions. It's something Fiona Stafford writes about in her new book The Long, Long Life of Trees. This hour, we sit down with the author. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

African Americans are a diverse group of people who live in our cities and our suburbs.

This hour, what does it mean to be black in Connecticut?

The Caribbean -- its islands, its history and its people -- has had a profound influence on communities around the globe -- including Connecticut.

This hour, we talk with author Joshua Jelly-Schapiro about his new book, Island People: The Caribbean and the World

Steve Hardy / Creative Commons

Year after year, hundreds of thousands of people find themselves homeless in the United States — including the young.

This hour, we explore local efforts to help homeless youth in Connecticut. What kinds of programs are out there to help them to not only find housing but employment, too?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Twenty-five-year-old hip-hop artist John Manselle-Young is well-known on the Connecticut stage -- performing under the pseudonym Tang Sauce. Coming up, we sit down with the musician to talk about his latest projects and hear his music live on-air. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The opioid epidemic in our nation upends lives and it’s the family members of addicts who intimately know the deadly costs of substance abuse.

This hour, we hear the personal story of one Connecticut mother and son. Despite the many hurdles addiction placed in their way, we hear how they are now working to help other families overcome these same hurdles.

Alex Barth / Creative Commons

Fifty-eight years; fifty states; one governor's commitment to change. This hour: statehood for Puerto Rico -- is it in the cards? We consider what lies ahead for the island under its new leader, Gov. Ricardo Rosselló.

Mike Maguire / Creative Commons

President Donald Trump’s executive order blocking refugees and banning citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries from the United States has ignited protests around the country.

This hour, we get reactions from Connecticut and learn how the travel ban could impact some of our residents.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: two musicians, two nations, one unifying sound. We sit down with Brazilian jazz artists Joe Carter and Isabella Mendes. We learn about their unique backgrounds and influences, and we listen to the music that brought them together. 

Md saad andalib / Creative Commons

It’s been nearly 50 years since a US Supreme Court decision put an end to state laws banning interracial marriage.

This hour, we learn about the civil rights case, Loving v. Virginia. Has society’s perceptions really changed from that landmark decision in 1967?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A new report gives voice to some of Connecticut's youngest domestic violence victims -- children six years old and younger. This hour, we take a look at the findings from that report and consider what’s being done to improve services for children who experience trauma. 

Stefan Baudy / Creative Commons

Recently we asked you what questions you have about how your town government works.

This hour, two listeners join us to ask their questions and we try to answer them.

Michael Vadon / Creative Commons

The inauguration of Republican President-elect Donald Trump -- many will attend; some will boycott; will you be watching?

This hour, we preview the day's events with a team of reporters and political experts, and we want to hear from you. 

John H Gray / Creative Commons

Train travel in the Northeast might soon be faster, more accessible and more reliable, but a lot of this relies on the federal government.

This hour — rail in Connecticut. Is it on the right track?

New Haven Promise

For some, the journey to higher education can feel more like a dead end -- an opportunity stifled by rising tuition fees and the weight of student loans.

Here in Connecticut however, initiatives such as New Haven Promise and Hartford Promise are working to make college more attainable to students.

This hour, we find out how. We sit down with officials from each Promise program and we also hear from you. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Budget woes, pension costs, job recovery -- those were just a few of the themes highlighted during Governor Dannel Malloy’s State of the State address last week.

This hour, Governor Malloy joins us live in-studio as we take a deeper look at those issues and more. 

Creative Commons

It’s hard to read the word "mafia" and not be reminded of scenes from The Godfather or Casino.

But mafias infiltrate more than just movie plots and crime novels. Their presence is felt in states and societies across the globe.

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