WNPR

The Wheelhouse

Wednesdays 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Connecticut's best journalists come out of the political trenches every Wednesday to join us on Connecticut Public Radio's weekly news roundtable, The Wheelhouse.

The Wheelhouse is a live, call-in show, so join us when we're on air at (860) 275-7266.

When we aren't on air, call us in the newsroom at (860) 275-7272.

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The crowded race for governor finally began to narrow this week as Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin announced he is abandoning his bid to be the Democratic Party's nominee.

Connecticut State Capitol / Wikimedia Commons

It's going to be a long fight leading up to Election Day, based on newly released campaign fundraising totals in Connecticut's race for governor and the Republican Governors Association's plan to reserve $1.7 million for television ads in the contest.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

For almost a decade, Democrats have held all of the state's five seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. But an unexpected development over the past week has given Republicans in Connecticut's Fifth Congressional District new hope for a victory in 2018.

John Phelan / Creative Commons

Robocalls, rallies, even an offer by Governor Malloy to make a Republican his next pick to the state's Supreme Court couldn't prevent Andrew McDonald's chief justice nomination from going down in flames.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This is stuff Hollywood couldn't script. Mark Boughton, a leading Republican candidate in the race to be Connecticut's next governor collapsed at a political event in Avon. One of his rivals, Prasad Srinivasan, who happens to be a doctor, rushed over to provide medical care.

Allen Allen / Creative Commons

The Connecticut House voted to approve Connecticut Supreme Court Justice Andrew McDonald to be chief justice Monday by one vote. The next stop is the Senate, where Republicans will have a one-vote majority after Democratic lawmaker Gayle Slossberg recused herself last week. 

Emily Stanchfield / Creative Commons

Tuesday marked the 20th anniversary of the shooting rampage at the state lottery headquarters in Newington. The horrific event prompted the passage of the state’s so-called “risk warrant” law allowing police to temporarily seize weapons from those deemed a threat to themselves or others.

Kuzma/iStock / Thinkstock

After being grilled by lawmakers late into the evening Monday, Andrew McDonald’s chances of becoming the state’s next Supreme Court chief justice turned dicey. The legislature’s Judiciary Committee voted 20-20 to advance his nomination, just a vote shy of a rejection.

Rod Waddington/flickr creative commons

Students surviving the Valentine’s Day school shooting in Parkland, Florida insist they will be the ones to finally end the gridlock over gun policy on the national level. Today we look at how the renewed debate may play out in Connecticut and the November election. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Much of state lawmakers’ budget-crafting in recent years has focused on cutting spending. Any proposals to raise revenue through new or expanded taxes are almost instantly decried as anti-business in a state increasingly hurting for business. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

At noon on Wednesday, Governor Dannel Malloy is delivering his final budget address to the Connecticut General Assembly. He’s already leaked a large part of what he would like to do: cut state aid to certain rich towns, lend a hand to Connecticut taxpayers hurt by the federal tax changes, and make it more expensive to drive on state highways, so we can afford to fix them. 

Ninian Reid / Creative Commons

This hour, we provide analysis of President Trump's State of the Union address. Much of the speech was aimed at bridging a divide between disgruntled hardliners now unsure about Trump’s seriousness on immigration, and more traditional Republicans, hoping to draft off a rising stock market and their tax cut win.

Lindsay Kinkade / Flickr Creative Commons

The group of people running for governor of the state of Connecticut isn't showing a real front-runner that everyone can agree on yet, but how are they talking about real reforms to the way the state operates? Is there more beyond lowering taxes and cutting wasteful spending? Dan Drew is out, and Ned Lamont is in - What's next for the Democratic race?

Mara Lavitt / WNPR

This week, Governor Dannel Malloy called for a ban on "bump stocks" -- devices that can make semi-automatic weapons fire like machine guns. Pfizer announced plans to end research into treatments for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases -- and they announced several hundred layoffs including at their facility in Groton. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The race for governor of Connecticut just got a lot more interesting. Joe Ganim, former inmate, current mayor of Bridgeport, unable to qualify for state financing, has announced that he’s in the race -- and establishment Democrats are worried about him getting into a primary.

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