The Colin McEnroe Show

The Colin McEnroe Show, hosted by Colin McEnroe, is looking for your phone calls and comments. Got an idea for a show? Know someone you'd love to hear Colin talk to? You can stream us live. While we are live, call us at (860) 275-7266, or email us at colin@wnpr.org. We're also on Twitter @wnprcolin

Contact producers Chion Wolf and Betsy Kaplan.

The executive producer is Catie Talarski.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:00 am
Fri April 25, 2014

The Nose Has a Master's Degree in Being Caught on Tape

Anthropology Professor James Boster at UConn, says "Praise Darwin" after arguing with Creationists.
Credit YouTube

This was a week when Connecticut professors got rambunctious, when pine tar was discovered in places it shouldn't have been, and when President Obama played soccer with a robot. I can't guarantee which of these things will make its way onto our weekly pop culture roundtable, The Nose, except definitely the professors.

This one from UConn mocked a the arguments of a creationist, and this one from Eastern was caught railing against Republicans.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:00 am
Thu April 24, 2014

The Eastern Hemlock is Dying

David Foster is the director of Harvard University's Harvard Forest, the author of Thoreau's Country: Journey Through a Transformed Landscape, and editor of Hemlock: A Forest Giant on the Edge
Chion Wolf

You have to trust us. 

Because I realize that a show about the Eastern Hemlock doesn't sound that sexy. In fact, we've done tree shows in the past after which I have said, "Let's not do any more tree shows." But we think we've got something here. 

First of all, this our third show working with Bob Sullivan, a writer who, in the past, has been able to make just about any topic exciting. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:38 am
Wed April 23, 2014

The Scramble: Fact-Checking, the "Rape Scene" and the NYT Op-Ed Page

NYT columnist, Thomas Friedman
Credit Charles Haynes / Wikimedia Commons

The more I read about The Dallas Buyers Club, the less I like it, which is too bad because I really like that movie.

First, I read the that film's portrayal of Ron Woodruff, the hard-bitten homophobe who gradually softens is wrong. Woodruff was, according to friends and family, comfortably bisexual. He never had to go through the transition you see in the film.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:58 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Pondering Modern Love

Credit Javie Delgado, Flickr Creative Commons

It's hard to improve on the poet, Rilke, who wrote, "Love consists of this, that two solitudes meet, protect, and greet each other." But did Rilke have to deal with Angry Birds and Snap Chat?

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:00 am
Mon April 21, 2014

How Do We Get Back to the Field of Dreams?

Credit Libby Baker / Wikimedia Commons

Is there a connection between what happens in youth sports and the locker room bullying of Richie Incognito or the steroid-spattered reputations of Alex Rodriguez and Lance Armstrong?

And, we all know that major college sports have become engines of commerce allowing a lot of people, although not the athletes who drive those engines, to get rich.

But, is there any way in which those dollar signs are sliding down into youth and high school sports.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:36 am
Fri April 18, 2014

The Agony and Utility of Ecstasy

C. Michael White is a Professor and Department Head at UConn’s School of Pharmacy.
Chion Wolf WNPR

"Molly" is the nickname for MDMA, or ecstasy. It's short for "molecule," meaning you're getting the "real thing," chemically speaking. Except you almost never do.

This hour, we talk about the dangers of Molly, the medical uses of MDMA, and the curious romance between the drug and the form of music known as EDM, Electronic Dance Music.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:36 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Jake Shimabukuro and Friends Show How Uke'n Play Ukulele

Jake Shimabukuro
Chion Wolf WNPR

The ukulele was not always obscure. Two of the biggest stars of the 20th century used them as their principal instruments. One is a name you probably don't know, but George Formby was a enormous sensation in Great Britain on stage and in movies in the 1920s and '30s. He specialized in playing a banjo-shaped ukulele, and he trafficked in comical, mischievous songs full of double entendres. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:22 am
Wed April 16, 2014

Forty Years, in Search of a Zipless F---

Erica Jong's "Fear of Flying" turned 40 this year. Jong spoke with Colin McEnroe about sex, childbearing, and gender in pop culture.
Credit Michael Childers

Fear of Flying sold 18 million copies worldwide and helped tip feminism into a new focus on fulfilled sexuality. But it also introduced a meme so pervasive that the book's author, Erica Jong, worried the phrase "zipless f--k" would appear on her tombstone.

Jong recenly defined the phrase on NPR's Weekend Edition:

The zipless f---- was more than a f----. It was a platonic ideal. Zipless, because when you came together, zippers fell away like rose petals. Underwear blew off in one breath like dandelion fluff. Tongues intertwined and turned liquid. Your whole soul flowed out through your tongue and into the mouth of your lover.

So how does the world of 2013 look to the writer who gave us Isadora Wing?

We talk with Jong about feminism and gender in American pop culture and politics.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:52 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

The Boston Marathon Bombing and the Road to Resilience

Credit miz_ginevra / Flickr Creative Commons

Consider America from 1985 to 2000. You wouldn't say nothing happened in those 15 years but America was a fairly calm place to be most of the time.

Now consider the period that came next. It began with a presidential election so riddled with such uncertainties that the effort to confirm the result dragged on for days and went to the Supreme Court.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:32 am
Mon April 14, 2014

The Scramble: Mad Men, Blood Moons, and Racism

Rand Richards Cooper is an author, essayist, and freelance writer.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Our SuperGuest on today's Scramble is Jen Doll, who has three topics that she wants to discuss:

The first is the return of Mad Men, a show in its final season and perhaps more than any other TV show, a driver of the phenomenon that utilizes the talents of many, many cultural commentators to analyze and debate the underlying themes in each episode. If you visited a site like Slate or Salon on certain Monday mornings, you might make the mistake of thinking this was a publication mainly, or entirely about, Mad Men.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:00 am
Fri April 11, 2014

The Nose Replaces Colbert, Marries Jesus, and Has No Love For the Gov

Portrait of a Lady: Susan Campbell is the communications and development director for Partnership for Strong Communities, and author of Tempest Tossed: The Spirit of Isabella Beecher Hooker.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Scientists say the papyrus that mentions a wife of Jesus is not a forgery. Stephen Colbert will take over when Letterman leaves. I'm not saying the two things are connected, but maybe our weekly culture roundtable The Nose will find a common thread.

It might seem like a small thing - the departure of Stephen Colbert from his late night role in which he depicts a strutting, preening, right-wing media star. In the last analysis, who cares who takes over the Letterman show?

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:00 am
Thu April 10, 2014

We've Only Just Begun: Carpenters Remembered

Randy Schmidt is the author of Little Girl Blue: The Life of Karen Carpenter and a music educator in Denton, Texas
Chion Wolf WNPR

If you are a person of a certain age, you probably remember the moment when you were first seized by Karen Carpenter's voice. For me, it was getting into my mother's Pontiac LeMans after a commencement ceremony at Kingswood School in 1970. I was a sophomore at an all-boys school, and nobody wanted to be "Close To" me.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:00 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Thomas Moore on "A Religion of One's Own"

Thomas Moore.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

Thomas Moore was, for 13 years, a Servite monk. In 1992, he burst onto the national scene with "Care of the Soul", which combined the psychotherapeutic of Jung and James Hillman with ancient and contemporary religious and spiritual ideas. It was number 1 on the New York Times best seller list, and stayed on the list for a year.

Moore's central premise is that part of ourselves cannot be fully nourished through purely rational modern thought. We have needs that cannot be met by science and social theory. His new book is kind of a toolkit for people who have that sense - that they need something they're not getting. They may not be comfortable sitting in a pew to get it, so can they make it themselves?

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:49 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Does Spite Advance Survival of a Species?

Credit Fibonacci Blue / Flickr Creative Commons

Spite is everywhere. It's as fresh as today's sports headlines as UConn readies to play Notre Dame for the women's basketball championship. Fighting Irish coach Muffet McGraw has acknowledged that there is hate between the two teams.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:00 am
Mon April 7, 2014

The Scramble Peeps Veep With Frank Rich

Today on the Scramble, we get to spend some time with Frank Rich. Frank wears a lot of hats these days as both editor-at-large at New York Magazine and Executive Producer of VEEP on HBO. We're going to chat with him in both capacities and there is an interesting bridge between the two realms.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:00 am
Fri April 4, 2014

The Nose Enjoys Neil deGrasse Tyson's Cosmos on the Rocks

Theresa Cramer.
Chion Wolf WNPR

The original Carl Sagan "Cosmos" was at least  partly a response to the Cold War. Its message: "We're such little specks, can we embrace our common destiny and get along?"

You could look at the movie "Noah" and the remake of "Cosmos" as two manifestations of an odd phenomenon. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
3:03 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Celebrating the Ninth Annual Trinity Hip Hop Festival

Self Suffice the Rap Poet is a nationally performing positive teaching artist.
Chion Wolf WNPR

When I say "hip hop," do you think about an art form the exalts bling, consumption, excess, decadence, and vulgarity? What about all the other hip hop artists, exploring other kinds of truths?

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:59 am
Wed April 2, 2014

The Race for the Higgs Boson

Philip Mannheim is a professor of Physics at the University of Connecticut and the author of "Brane-Localized Gravity"
Chion Wolf

Scientists made an announcement on July 4, 2012 to little fanfare outside the world of scholarly physicists that ended a 50-year search to explain the existence of life as we know it. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:51 am
Tue April 1, 2014

April Fool's! Exploring Pranks and Practical Jokes

A screenshot from a broadcast of the spaghetti harvest BBC April Fool's Day joke.
Credit BBC

I'll be honest: I hate April Fools' Day, and I'm not a big fan of practical jokes. I hate it the way that some people hate Valentine's Day or New Year's Eve. I think merriment and foolishness should be spread across the year. That's why most of our shows, even pretty serious ones, start with a comedy sketch, because life is so much better when you think of it as a comedy.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:31 am
Mon March 31, 2014

The Scramble Meets Charla Nash, Talks Politics With David Plotz

Charla Nash.
Credit Shelly Sindland / Shelly Sindland Photography

The Scramble, our Monday episode, is a wrap-up of the weekend's news, and a look at the week ahead. This hour, we have a conversation with Charla Nash, who is seeking the right to sue the state of Connecticut over the chimpanzee attack in 2009 that left her badly mutilated.

We also feature our SuperGuest, Slate Political Gabfest panelist, David Plotz. He's been thinking a lot about the high-budget involved in anti-technology films like the upcoming movie, Noah, and whether or not Hillary Clinton is too old to run for president.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:00 am
Fri March 28, 2014

The Nose Travels to the Grand Budapest Hotel

Gorman Bechard is a film director, screenwriter, and novelist.
Chion Wolf WNPR

A hilariously fussy hotel manager with a taste for the high life is wrenched from his gay surroundings by the specter of war and a false murder charge. That doesn't sound terribly funny, but it's the premise for "The Grand Budapest Hotel," the latest Wes Anderson movie. Our Nose panelists all went to see it, and it will be one of our topics on this show.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:00 am
Thu March 27, 2014

What It's Like to (Try to) Make Cartoons for The New Yorker

Credit Jared Narber / Flickr Creative Commons

I'll tell you one of the big thrills of my writing career: I was a contributing editor to Mirabella Magazine in the 80's. I'd written an essay about getting bitten (sort of) by a dog in New Hampshire. The magazine had a huge art budget in those days, and I had already had one of my pieces illustrated by Ed Koren. But they told me this one was being illustrated by George Booth. George Booth! I worship George Booth! And so it came to pass that my article ran with a classing Booth dog cartoon.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:00 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Secrets of the Sea

Credit Jagadhatri / Wikimedia Commons

   I get way too much of my information from movies and  this year large container ships played a role in two major films.

The first was Captain Phillips, an account of piracy in the Indian Ocean. The problem with that movie is that it didn't ask any fundamental questions about the method of moving stuff around.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:38 am
Tue March 25, 2014

Hearing Voices

Peter Bullimore owns a training/consultant agency, Asylum Associates, and is the founding member of the Paranoia Network in England. He also holds a teaching and research post at Manchester University and is a published author on voices and trauma
Chion Wolf

Teresa of Avila very unambiguously reported hearing voices. She's a saint. John Forbes Nash heard voices. He won a Nobel prize. Robert Schumann heard voices that spurred him to write great music.

Philip K. Dick was guided by one inner voice, specifically female, that he would hear for much of his life. He probably holds the record for most film adaptations for words written of any author ever.

Mahatma Gandhi described a voice he could hear; not a metaphorical inner conversation, but a voice.

I could go on. Hearing voices is not that unusual. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:31 am
Mon March 24, 2014

The Scramble: Intelligence Gathering, the History of Missing Airplanes, and the Book of Mormon

Credit Future Atlas / Flickr Creative Commons

Today on The Scramble, we'll talk about a system run by the Navy that keeps track of, among other things, parking tickets and field information cards filled out by police, even when no crime has occurred - is this data collection crossing a line?

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:30 am
Fri March 21, 2014

WARNING: The Nose May Contain Trigger Warnings

Susan Campbell is the Communications & Development Director for Partnership for Strong Communities, and the author of Tempest Tossed: The Spirit of Isabella Beecher Hooker.
Chion Wolf WNPR

here are the topics for the Nose today:

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The Colin McEnroe Show
1:15 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Comics, From Niche to Mainstream

Helder Mira is a filmmaker for Rabbit Ears Media
Chion Wolf

Once upon a time, comic books were a niche for kids and nerds. Now they are mainstream culture. "The Avengers" is the number three all-time worldwide grossing movie.

I would like to pause, and say that I owned, as a kid, issue number one of The Avengers. I remember distinctly where I got it, and how I felt about it. I do not remember distinctly what happened to it.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:21 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

A Salute to Irish Music with Martin Hayes

Martin Hayes is one of the world’s most creative and accomplished fiddlers, hailing from County Clare, Ireland.
Chion Wolf WNPR

The musician Christy Moore said Ireland could never have the equivalent of a folk revival because it never let its traditions lapse. And that's very true. The are probably other places in the world as deeply attached to their traditional music, but I don't know where they are.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:08 am
Tue March 18, 2014

March Madness 2014

Julia Pistell is the Director of Writing Programs at the Mark Twain House & Museum in Hartford, and a co-founder of Sea Tea Improv.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Where is Wofford College? What is a shock of wheat, and what does it have to do with Wichita State's scary mascot? For that matter, what's a Chanticleer?

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:44 am
Mon March 17, 2014

The Scramble on Agunuah, Vaccinations, and More

Credit Alex Proimos / Wikimedia Commons

Mark Oppenheimer writes about religion and a whole bunch of other things. Today, he'll be talking about the difficulty Orthodox Jewish women face in obtaining a certain form of cooperation from their husbands and how that difficulty spawned a black market in coercion and violence.

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