All Things Considered

Monday - Friday, 5:00 p.m. and Weekends at 5:00 pm
Guy Raz

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

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Movies
6:27 pm
Sat January 17, 2015

London Project Aims To Increase Diversity Of Filmmakers

Originally published on Sat January 17, 2015 6:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Almost as soon as the Oscar nominations were announced this week, many people were pointing out an uncomfortable fact. Every director nominated is a white male. All the nominees for lead and supporting actor are white.

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Law
6:27 pm
Sat January 17, 2015

Justice Department To Halt Seizure Of Assets

Originally published on Sat January 17, 2015 6:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Middle East
5:31 pm
Sat January 17, 2015

Syrian Opposition Groups Wary Of Russia's Invitation To Moscow

A rebel fighter takes aim during a training session in Eastern al-Ghouta, a rebel-held region outside the capital Damascus, earlier this month. Russia is inviting Syrian opposition groups to peace talks in Moscow, but few of them want to go to a country that supports Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.
Abd Doumany AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 17, 2015 6:59 pm

The war in Syria has been raging for nearly four years and it's been challenging for diplomats to get warring sides to agree on even temporary truces.

The U.N. envoy is pressing ahead on that front, while Russia tries to play peacemaker. Russia is inviting the parties to Moscow this month, but some opposition groups won't go to a country that has been backing Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

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Around the Nation
5:22 pm
Sat January 17, 2015

Why Is The FBI Investigating A California Police Department?

Originally published on Sat January 17, 2015 10:03 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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In the border town of Calexico, California, the FBI has launched a federal investigation into the police department. Jill Replogle has been reporting on the investigation for member station KPBS.

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Sports
5:22 pm
Sat January 17, 2015

World Darts Championship Ends In Dramatic Fashion

Originally published on Sat January 17, 2015 6:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Parallels
5:21 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

French Immigrants To Israel Bring Part Of Home With Them

An estimated 400 new French Jewish immigrants attended a welcoming ceremony after arriving on a flight from France to Tel Aviv, Israel in July 2014.
Lior Mizrahi Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 11:39 pm

French Jews, often with roots in North Africa, have been immigrating to Israel since that country's founding. The community has changed with the times, and after last week's attacks in Paris, is expected to grow — and change — again.

Samuela Mass left Paris in October last year. The 28-year-old French Jew came to Israel for a better life for him and his future family — and to escape violence.

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Sports
5:21 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

'Championship Sunday,' When Four NFL Teams Become Two

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 6:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Packers and Seahawks, Patriots and Colts. It's Championship Sunday this weekend in the NFL. The winners will head to the Super Bowl on February 1. Jane McManus, of ESPN, joins us now for a preview. Hey, Jane.

JANE MCMANUS: Hi, how are you?

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Author Interviews
4:50 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

'Thieves Of State' Reveals Tremendous Power Of Global Corruption

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 6:32 pm

Audie Cornish talks to former NPR reporter Sarah Chayes about how corruption can create the fertile ground for religious extremism. Chayes is a senior associate in the Democracy and Rule of Law Program and the South Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment. Her new book is Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security.

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Law
4:45 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

In 'Silk Road' Trial, FBI Paints Picture Of 'True Drug Empire'

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 6:32 pm

The Silk Road was an online anonymous black market for buying and selling illegal drugs. The FBI shut it down in 2013 and now the man accused of running that billion-dollar drug market is on trial. Audie Cornish speaks with Wired reporter Andy Greenberg.

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Africa
4:40 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

Satellite Photos Reveal Wider Destruction In Nigeria

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 6:32 pm

Audie Cornish talks to Adotei Akwei, managing director of government relations for Amnesty International, about the NGO's analysis of satellite photos taken over Nigeria. He says the images before and after Boko Haram's attacks last week contradicts the Nigerian government's claim that only 150 people died from them. Akwei claims that these attacks over were the most devastating yet.

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Shots - Health News
5:20 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Limited Insurance Choices Frustrate Patients In California

Dennie and Kathy Wright sift through a stack of medical bills at their home in Indian Valley, Calif.
Pauline Bartolone for NPR

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 8:39 pm

Dennie Wright lives in Indian Valley, a tiny alpine community at the northern end of the Sierra, close to the border with Nevada.

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Middle East
5:14 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Is U.S. Gaining Or Losing Ground Against ISIS?

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 6:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Ed
5:08 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Do Fictional Geniuses Hold Back Real Women?

Geniuses in movies aren't always played by Benedict Cumberbatch, but they are almost always men.
Weinstein Co./Studiocanal/Kobal Collection

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 8:39 am

The "Lone Genius" character is hot right now in television and movies. Sometimes the genius is real (think Benedict Cumberbatch in The Imitation Game), and sometimes he's fictional (think Benedict Cumberbatch in Sherlock). But one thing is almost always certain: He's a guy.

Now one researcher says that gender stereotype in art may have a real impact on women in academia.

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Global Health
5:02 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

WHO Report Details Why Ebola Hit West Africa So Hard

Ebola was out of control in Liberia in August, when this picture was taken.
Dominique Faget AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 1:16 pm

Today, the World Health Organization issued a 14-part report on Ebola, from the moment it started until now.

We asked our team of Ebola correspondents to look at the sections and pull out the points that seemed most interesting — that may have been overlooked or forgotten, stories that show how the virus turned into an epidemic.

Where it all began

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Europe
4:58 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Paris Attacks Bring New Attention To Free Speech Laws In France

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 6:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
6:48 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

Dollar's Rise Is Good News For The U.S., For Now

A pedestrian passes a currency exchange in London Jan. 5. The value of the U.S. dollar has risen about 15 percent against the euro since last summer.
Andy Rain EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 8:17 pm

If you've traveled outside the U.S. recently, or sent your U.S.-made products abroad, you've probably noticed that the dollar is getting stronger. The stronger dollar is the sign of a healthier U.S. economy, but its strength has the potential to erode growth.

There are a number of factors behind the dollar's rise, says economist Jens Nordvig, a currency expert at Nomura Securities. The main one is the health of the U.S. economy.

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Television
6:13 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

Nancy Grace Says 'Gone Girl' Satire Was Flattering, Made Her Laugh Out Loud

The movie Gone Girl fictionalizes and satirizes cable news star Nancy Grace (above). Grace, host of a true crimes and current affairs show on HLN, says she was flattered.
Mark Hill AP

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 10:26 am

Among those hoping for an Academy Award nomination on Thursday are the producers of the Fox Studios thriller Gone Girl. The film centers on marital strife, a mysterious disappearance and the murder investigation that ensues.

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U.S.
6:11 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

Homeland Security Secretary Defends Executive Actions On Immigration

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 6:33 pm

Audie Cornish talks to Jeh Johnson, secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), about what the effects would be on DHS if Congress did not vote to fund it.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Parallels
6:11 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

Some French Muslims See Conspiracies In Paris Shootings

A man walks through the Grand Mosque in Paris on Jan. 9. Some Muslims have questioned the official version of the shootings in Paris and embraced conspiracy theories. In schools, some Muslim students refused to take part in a moment of silence for the victims.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 8:43 pm

Last week's shootings in Paris shocked the French. Many received another jolt when they learned that some Muslim students refused to join in the minute of national silence observed across the country following the Charlie Hebdo attacks.

The newspaper Le Figaro quoted one teacher in a heavily Muslim neighborhood in the eastern city of Strasbourg as saying that 80 percent of her students did not participate.

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The Great Plains Oil Rush
4:59 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

Falling Oil Prices Have North Dakota Migrants Rethinking The Boom

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 6:33 pm

A year ago, as part of our series on the Great Plains oil rush, we brought you the story of a 36-year-old father who had recently lost his job when one of the last major timber mills in the Northwest shut down. After several years struggling to find steady work and even after going back to school, Rory Richardson decided to commute 550 miles from his home in far western Montana, to a place where jobs are plentiful - the oil fields of North Dakota. But after a little more than a year, he and his family have decided the toll is just too great.

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The Two-Way
4:51 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

French Ambassador To U.S. Outlines 'Predicament' Of Immigration

French Ambassador to the U.S. Gerard Araud addresses a solidarity gathering at the Adas Israel Congregation in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. Araud said last week's attack was "in a sense maybe worse than what we were expecting, because it was done in a very professional way."
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 6:33 pm

As it mourns the tragedy of last week's attack in Paris, France's government is also concerned about more attacks and how to adapt to prevent them. The concerns range from coping with 5,000 radical youth to becoming a society of immigration, France's ambassador to the United States, Gerard Araud, says.

While France's leaders had feared a terrorist attack within its borders, Araud says that "what happened was in a sense maybe worse than what we were expecting, because it was done in a very professional way."

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Technology
4:51 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

Finding, Selling Flaws In Apple's Code Can Be Lucrative Work

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 6:33 pm

Every time there is a big new release of some Apple software or operating system, hackers get to work — finding a flaw in Apple's computer code can be very lucrative. Criminals and even governments are willing to pay top dollar for the ability to get inside our iPhones.

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U.S.
6:45 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

For Some Immigrants, Temporary Life In U.S. Can Mean A Long Stay

Alex Sanchez with his wife, Blanca, and sons Duvan and Irvin. Sanchez has been eligible to live and work legally in the U.S. since 2001, when his home country, El Salvador, experienced a major earthquake.
Alexandra Starr for NPR

Earlier this month, the U.S. government gave more than 200,000 Salvadorans living here temporarily the opportunity to stay for at least another 18 months.

These immigrants are on something called Temporary Protected Status, or TPS. It's for immigrants who are already living in the United States illegally when a natural or humanitarian disaster hits their home country.

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Religion
6:45 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

Kansas City Catholics Divided Over Vatican Investigation Of Bishop

Bishop Robert Finn of the Kansas City-St. Joseph Diocese was convicted of shielding a sexually abusive priest in 2012. He is now the subject of a Vatican investigation.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 5:33 pm

A Catholic bishop normally governs pretty much unchecked in his diocese — only the pope can dislodge a bishop. And each time Catholics celebrate Mass in Kansas City, Mo., they pray for Bishop Robert Finn, right after they pray for Pope Francis.

But some Catholics here, like David Biersmith, a Eucharistic minister, refuse to go along.

"When the priest says that, you know, you're supposed say it with him, but I just leave that out," Biersmith says. "I just don't say it. Because he's not my bishop, as far as I'm concerned."

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Business
6:45 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

Winning The Truck Battle Isn't Just About Smack Talk. It's Everything

Ford's F-150 truck beat the Chevrolet Colorado and Lincoln MKC as the Detroit auto show's 2015 North American Truck of the Year.
He Xianfeng Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Wed January 14, 2015 4:25 am

For the Detroit automakers, there's likely no bigger prize than being the No. 1 truck. Pickups represent the lion's share of profits and the industry's recent growth.

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Technology
5:20 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

A Closer Look At Obama's Plan To Protect Consumer Data

President Obama speaks Tuesday at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center in Arlington, Va.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 6:55 pm

This week, in the lead up to his State of the Union address, President Obama is talking about cybersecurity — how to ensure our safety in the digital world.

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Africa
4:32 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

Boko Haram May Control Up To 20 Percent Of Nigeria

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 6:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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The Salt
4:30 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

GMO Potatoes Have Arrived. But Will Anyone Buy Them?

After a turn in the tumbling machine, these conventional russet Burbank potatoes are starting to show signs of bruising. New GMO potatoes called Innate russet Burbanks have been bred not to bruise as easily as these.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 2:43 pm

On the face of it, the new potato varieties called "Innate" seem attractive. If you peel the brown skin off their white flesh, you won't find many unsightly black spots. And when you fry them, you'll probably get a much smaller dose of a potentially harmful chemical.

But here's the catch: Some of the biggest potato buyers in the country, such as Frito-Lay and McDonald's, seem afraid to touch these potatoes. Others don't even want to talk about them because they are genetically modified organisms, or GMOs.

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Politics
4:24 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

Mitt Romney, Jeb Bush Could Split Republican Loyalties

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 6:45 pm

Melissa Block speaks with Patrick O'Connor, political reporter for the Wall Street Journal about Mitt Romney telling donors he wants to run again for president in 2016. O'Connor says Romney and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush have the advantage of not being in office and have the ability to raise more money via superPACs before they declare their candidacy.

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Code Switch
6:29 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

The Story Behind '40 Acres And A Mule'

The Green-Meldrim House in Savannah, Ga., is where Gen. William T. Sherman held meetings with local black leaders, creating the plan later known as "40 acres and a mule."
Sarah McCammon NPR

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 2:30 pm

As the Civil War was winding down 150 years ago, Union leaders gathered a group of black ministers in Savannah, Ga. The goal was to help the thousands of newly freed slaves.

From that meeting came Gen. William T. Sherman's Special Field Order 15. It set aside land along the Southeast coast so that "each family shall have a plot of not more than forty acres of tillable ground."

That plan later became known by a signature phrase: "40 acres and a mule."

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