WNPR

Tucker Ives

Digital Producer

Tucker Ives is WNPR's digital producer.

He is a former talk show producer at the station, working on Where We Live, The Colin McEnroe Show, and The Wheelhouse from 2011 to 2016.

Tucker is also a substitute host for WNPR’s Morning Edition and occasionally reports for on-air. On the side, he produces the book podcast Literary Disco.

Tucker graduated from Ithaca College's Roy H. Park School of Communications in 2011 where he majored in "Television-Radio" with a concentration in international communications. In college, he was a producer, reporter and host at WICB. He started off as an intern and freelancer with WNPR in the summer of 2009.

Tucker grew up in Marlborough, Connecticut where he was a video production nerd at RHAM High School. He now lives in Vernon with his wife Jillian and his iPad. According to his 6th grade yearbook, Tucker initially wanted to be a professional baseball manager. He settled for merely being a fantasy baseball manager.

In real life, his favorite team is the Yankees and proudly sat in the last row of the nosebleed section for Game 7 of the 2003 ALCS.

Ways to Connect

C-Span

Three days after 49 people were killed in a mass shooting inside an Orlando, Florida nightclub, Senator Chris Murphy held the floor of the U.S. Senate for nearly 15 hours to talk about gun violence.

Pete Souza / White House

In nearly eight years as President of the United States, Barack Obama has delivered more than a dozen responses to mass shootings. The attack on a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida has re-ignited passionate debate on guns, the fight against ISIS, and LGBT discrimination. Several members of Connecticut's congressional delegation have called the legislative branch "complicit" in these repeated acts of violence and criticized colleagues for inaction on gun control. 

Tracy Lee Carroll / Creative Commons

This Saturday, you have no excuse to say there's nothing to do in Connecticut. That's because it's the state's Open House Day for residents and visitors to explore the state -- from the smallest of historical sites to the largest of museums. This hour, we preview just a sliver of what is out there. What little gems exist where you live?

Matt A.J. / Creative Commons

The Associated Press said Hillary Clinton "clinched" the Democratic nomination for president on Monday. The Bernie Sanders campaign and supporters weren't happy. "Let those people vote and decide before the media tells them that the race is over," Sanders' campaign manager Jeff Weaved told CNN. Should the A.P. have waited until after Tuesday's final big primary day?

Naval Submarine Base New London

For a century, Groton, Connecticut has been home to the Naval Submarine Base and Training School. It’s turned into an economic staple for the region with the presence of manufacturer Electric Boat. The state is celebrating one hundred years as the "Submarine Capital of the World." This hour, we discuss the history of the submarine industry and how it fares today. Even after all these years, the vessels continue to play an important role in U.S. military strategy.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Donald Trump hits the magic number to become presumptive Republican nominee on his quest to become the next POTUS. On the other side of the aisle, Bernie Sanders asked the Democratic National Committee to boot Dan Malloy from his role at the convention. This hour on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we discuss the jobs and duties of these politicians.

Lennart Tange / Creative Commons

If you're allergic to it, you might be cursing pollen in between sneezes right now. But the process of pollination is essential to plant, animal, and human life. All sorts of insects and animals can be pollinators including bats, bees, moths, butterflies, birds, and even lemurs!

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

The Wheelhouse is moving out of its parents' house (on Where We Live) and is now its own, independent person ...er ...radio show! John and Colin are back with a new edition of our weekly news roundtable after a week away.

After a couple rough and tumble legislative sessions, several lawmakers are not seeking re-election this year, including House Speaker Brendan Sharkey. In the Year of Trump, can Republicans win control of a legislative chamber in Hartford?

Alberto Cairo / ProPublica

A few years ago,  a public outcry forced schools to re-examine their use of seclusion and restraints among students. This hour, we have a conversation with the Office of the Child Advocate about the use of restraints and seclusion in schools. We also hear from a parent of a developmentally disabled student about the challenges she faces in her child’s public school education.

Gloda/iStock / Thinkstock

There's a debate in West Hartford over plans by a for-profit company to open an educational academy for Chinese students in town. The plan would include sending some students to the public high schools.

What are the pros and cons in allowing international students into our public schools at a time when districts face declining enrollment and budget constraints? Is this a creative way to fund public schools or is it detrimental to their mission? 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The state legislature heads into overtime to discuss (and hopefully pass) a budget that was partially unveiled nearly a week after the regular session ended.

This hour, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will discuss how things operated during this legislative session. We also recap the Democratic and Republican state conventions where (eventually) all reporters were credentialed to cover the proceedings if they wanted to. But this has us thinking about the press and the 2016 election overall this year. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Ten years ago, Democratic political newcomer Ned Lamont launched a bid to unseat his party’s incumbent U.S. senator. He defeated Joe Lieberman in the primary and brought national political attention to Connecticut. But 2006 was also the year that our show launched. This hour, we look back at that campaign with Lamont and talk about what has happened in the state and country since then. 

Krissy Venosdale / Creative Commons

In his State of the State address, Governor Dan Malloy asked legislators not to wait until the last day of the session to pass a budget. At the time, lawmakers gave him a standing ovation. Flash forward a few months to the waning hours of the regular session, and what still needs to be passed? The state budget.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission / Flickr Creative Commons

New York's Indian Point nuclear facility has faced a number of recent incidents including fires, blown transformers, and most recently detection of radioactive water near the facility. This hour, an update on the situation there and in Florida where the Turkey Point nuclear facility is under scrutiny.

We also hear from WNPR’s David DesRoches, who has been following the story of PCBs in Connecticut schools and in Alabama.

WNPR

As presidential candidates crisscross the United States, they have to learn how to win in open primaries, closed primaries, and caucuses. If they want their party's nomination, they need support from average voters and the more high-profile superdelegates. Candidates also must navigate the unique and varying rules of each state's contest. We haven't even gotten to the general election and the electoral college rules!

Pages