Tucker Ives

Producer

Tucker Ives produces WNPR’s talk shows, Where We Live and The Colin McEnroe Show. He produced the PRNDI award-winning episode on the world of children’s television in 2010 and his reporting on the last remaining bell factory in the country destroyed in a fire aired on NPR’s Morning Edition.

Tucker graduated from Ithaca College's Roy H. Park School of Communication in 2011 where he was a producer, reporter and host at WICB. He started off as an intern and freelancer with WNPR in the summer of 2009 and kept coming back for more until he was hired full-time in 2011.

In addition to producing Where We Live and The Colin McEnroe Show, Tucker is the producer and a substitute host for WNPR’s Morning Edition and occasionally reports for WNPR. On the side, he produces the book podcast Literary Disco.

During his Ithaca College years, Tucker was a Television-Radio major with a concentration in International Communications. He traveled to Qatar for a research project focused on the pan-Arab television network, Al Jazeera Children’s Channel. Tucker was also a producer for a documentary film on a third-party candidate running for mayor of New York City. He presented his research on obscenity regulations in the media at the National Conference for Undergraduate Research in 2011. 

Tucker grew up in Marlborough, Connecticut where he was a video production nerd at RHAM High School. He now lives in Vernon with his wife Jillian and his iPad. According to his 6th grade yearbook, Tucker initially wanted to be a professional baseball manager. He settled for merely being a fantasy baseball manager. In real life, his favorite team is the Yankees and proudly sat in the last row of the nosebleed section for Game 7 of the 2003 ALCS.

Ways to Connect

Rik Stevens / New Hampshire Public Radio

As the electoral circus leaves New Hampshire, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will recap the results and news from the first primary of 2016. This early in the process, the losers may be as interesting as the winners. Which candidates will call it quits after Tuesday?

Ted Eytan / Creative Commons

The eyes of the political world are on New Hampshire as candidates, supporters, and reporters descend upon the Granite State for Primary Day.

Do Democratic voters #FeelTheBern? Will Trump triumph on the Republican side? Fortunately, these questions will be answered in a few hours. But in the mean time, we check-in with reporters and various campaign supporters from Connecticut who have been making the drive to our neighbors in the north.

Paul Gionfriddo

Paul Gionfriddo leads Mental Health America but he has deep roots in Connecticut. He’s a former state representative and mayor of Middletown who now advocates for people with mental illness. During his time in the legislature, he worked on laws and policies that contributed to the nation's current mental health crisis. His book Losing Tim explores his own son’s struggle with schizophrenia and the mental health system that failed him.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dan Malloy delivers his "State of the State" address Wednesday as the legislature reconvenes for this year's regular session. The state budget deficit looms large over the capitol and deep cuts throughout government are expected. The session also starts in the wake of high-profile corporations testing the waters of relocation to other states.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Despite an effort the eliminate the state budget deficit late last year, the numbers remain in the red just a week before this year's regular session begins. Gov. Dan Malloy has tapped his troubleshooter to temporarily take the helm of the beleaguered Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles, and a high school doesn't want any "idiots" on its stage. 

Anne / Creative Commons

Connecticut will miss the brunt of the winter storm affecting the mid-Atlantic region, but not all parts of the state will be untouched. The worst will be along the shoreline with the possibility of six to ten inches in some parts. Meanwhile, northern Connecticut may see no accumulation at all.

CT Senate Democrats / Creative Commons

Questions continue to swirl around a car crash involving a state senator. Andrew Maynard, a Democrat from Stonington, was already recovering from a fall at his home in 2014 that left some questioning his ability to serve before the most recent incident. 

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Recent polls show the gap closing between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders for the Democratic presidential nomination. With less than three weeks until the Iowa caucuses, Sanders is getting help from outside organizations.

White House

What is the state of the union? It's probably strong, as the previous five presidents have said. This hour, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will recap President Barack Obama's final State of the Union address. We also look ahead to the race for his successor. Former President Bill Clinton swings through Connecticut to fundraise for his wife's campaign.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

U.S. Representative Elizabeth Esty joins us ahead of President Barack Obama's final State of the Union address. One of the big issues being pushed by the president is on guns. It's something that has been Esty's focus since she took office just after the 2012 Sandy Hook school shooting. This hour, we check-in with the Democrat from the 5th congressional district.

White House

Connecticut lawmakers were given advance notice of President Obama’s executive orders on guns. The Newtown school shooting was referenced several times during Obama's speech and several family members of the victims were in attendance. This week, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will discuss the president’s action and some recognition by the New York Times on Connecticut’s criminal justice reforms.

President Barack Obama announced a series of executive actions on Tuesday intended to combat gun violence. His plans would require background checks for guns bought from dealers even if they're purchased online or at gun shows. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

It’s the 2015 finale to our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, and what a year it’s been. From the unlikely return of Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim, to ongoing discussions about a new casino, the news kept us on our toes. This hour, we recap not only the week’s news, but the year’s news with our panel and you can join the conversation with the stories that mattered most to you.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

As part of an annual tradition, the "Internet's Busiest Music Nerd" Anthony Fantano of The Needle Drop got back to his roots at WNPR where he used to intern and shared some of his favorite music of the year on Where We Live.

Seinfeld / NBC

It's time to air your grievances about the news of 2015. Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will convene for the first time ever on the Costanza-invented holiday of Festivus! We have lots of grievances, but what do you want to speak up about? Who should participate in the feats of strength?

Donkey Hotey / Flickr

Republican presidential hopefuls debate for the first time since the Paris attacks and San Bernardino shootings and national security is on the forefront of national discussion. This hour on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we discuss the latest debate in the long road to the White House. There was more of a clear divide between some candidates, especially surrounding military spending and intelligence gathering.

Central Connecticut State University

Faculty at Connecticut's state universities are negotiating with the Board of Regents over a new three-year contract. Last month the new president of the Board, Mark Ojakian joined us to discuss the negotiations from his perspective. This hour, we hear from several of the professors pushing back against cuts and other changes in the public higher education system.

Ron Cogswell / Creative Commons

The national political conversation has shifted to a focus on security, guns, and terrorism. Our weekly political news roundtable The Wheelhouse will discuss the shift and the role Connecticut's congressional delegation has played in the national dialogue.

How does this resonate among Connecticut voters, and how might it affect next year's elections?

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

On Monday, the first police officer went to trial for the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore. Just a few days earlier, video was released of a white police officer in Chicago shooting a black man 16 times.

This hour, we talk about race and racism with three people including Hartford resident Gareth Weston, a black man whose own daughter thought he looked like a "bad guy" when wearing a dark hooded sweatshirt. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Lawmakers are gearing up for a special session later this month as leaders continue to discuss a new budget agreement. The whole process is plagued by uncertainty though. How much is the budget shortfall? What corporations will have a presence in the state? Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will have its own budget talk.

Ruocaled / Creative Commons

Will state lawmakers have a budget deal in place to be thankful for on Thursday? Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will bring you updates from the state capitol where time ticks away for an agreement on how to fix the state budget. 

Robert Scoble / Creative Commons

Lawrence Lessig recently ended his pursuit of running for president as a Democrat. But his mission to take money out of politics and fix corruption is not over. He recently slammed Connecticut Democrats who proposed suspending the state’s Citizens Election Program. He joins us to discuss his experience and struggles in running for president and Connecticut’s campaign finance laws.

Paul Morigi / Brookings Institute

In a special edition of our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we are joined by reporters from Vermont Public Radio to discuss their new radio documentary Becoming Bernie, which will air on WNPR. We discuss the rise of Bernie Sanders and how the Democratic party is responding to his popularity in the 2016 race for president.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

State Republicans have long been asking to be "at the table" in budget negotiations. Now, with a massive deficit, they are finally getting what they wished for and they announced their proposed fixes. "We not only fix the problem we’re in now because that’s our statutory obligation, but we make structural changes so this state can sustain itself not for the next month, not the next six months, but for generations to come," said House minority leader Themis Klarides. 

Christiaan Triebert / Creative Commons

The Paris bombings and shootings are the latest in a string of attacks by the Islamic State. Mourners around the world have gathered to show support for the victims and world leaders are responding politically and militarily. This hour, national security expert and Connecticut native Scott Bates discusses what the appropriate response should be.

We also hear from a University of Connecticut student responding to racist graffiti on his friend Mahmoud's door.

DonkeyHotey / Creative Commons

There was one moment in Tuesday's Republican presidential debate that reminded us of all those other unwieldy, freewheeling and circus-like debates that came before: Rand Paul getting cut off by Carly Fiorina, and then Donald Trump drawing boos for being Trump. For the most part, though, last night’s debate was much more orderly. It was so orderly that rarely did the candidates, who had complained so loudly about previous moderators, get challenged on any of their statements.

Sergey Borisov/iStock / Thinkstock

U.S. Senator Chris Murphy is making another push for mental health reform in Congress that he hopes will overhaul and strengthen the mental health care system. He joins us from Washington, D.C. to explain the legislation and to discuss some recent news on the U.S. policy on Syria and use of drones. 

We also talk to U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal about an Obama administration proposal to help address Puerto Rico's fiscal challenges. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

After weeks of dismissing the idea of a special session, more bad budget news is pushing Governor Dannel Malloy in that direction. On our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we discuss this and all the week's news, including an update on a plan by the state's Board of Regents that has professors fighting mad.

Miguel Ariel Contreras Drake-McLaughlin (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Bob Woodward thought he knew everything about Watergate. Then Alexander Butterfield, now in his late 80's, told him there were other stories never spoken of. Woodward focuses on these stories in his latest book on the Watergate scandal called The Last of the President's Men. This hour, we hear from the legendary Washington Post journalist.

Also, the Wesleyan Argus faces an uncertain financial future. In September, the paper published an op-ed criticizing the "Black Lives Matter" movement. The backlash now threatens funding for The Argus next year.

DonkeyHotey / Flickr Creative Commons

The 2016 presidential cycle has been mostly dominated by a crowded Republican field but now it's the Democrats' turn as the candidates square off in their first debate. Also this week, former President Bill Clinton is in Connecticut to accept an award at UConn. But a trip to the Nutmeg State isn’t complete without a fundraiser, so he’s swinging by Attorney General George Jepsen’s house to fundraise for his wife’s presidential campaign as well. But out of all these events, only the debate will be broadcast in virtual reality.

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