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Susan Campbell

Contributor

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Susan Campbell is a long-time journalist whose work has appeared in The Hartford Courant, Connecticut Magazine, CT Health Investigative Team, The New Haven Register, The Guardian, and other publications.

She is a distinguished lecturer at University of New Haven, and the Robert C. Vance Chair in Journalism and Mass Communication at CCSU.

Her memoir, Dating Jesus: Fundamentalism, Feminism, and the American Girl, won the 2010 Connecticut Book award for memoir.

Ways to Connect

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For the past six months, Chastity Kerr has lived at a 27-bed family shelter in Hartford, Conn., with her three children, ages 14, 11, and 8.

Ryan Caron King / NENC

One cold night late in November, Hartford police officers Joe Walsh and K9 officer Alfredo Pizarro called in a 10-27, a community service call, from Bushnell Park.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Over the last week or so, your inbox and mailbox has been filling with requests for donations from non-profit organizations. Oxfam International, Doctors Without Borders, your local food bank, and homeless shelter all depend on year-end generosity to meet their budgets.

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Before she started work at New Haven’s Columbus House as senior manager of housing services, Cathleen Meaden’s job was housing people whose crimes were seemingly unforgivable.

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When state governments  -- in Maine, Utah, and elsewhere  -- want to learn about ending homelessness, they often look to Connecticut.

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As a small boy, Robert Cotto, Jr. moved with his family to Hartford, where most of his extended family was living in the city’s North End.

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Jim King grew up in a military family and he intended to make the Marines his career.

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Say you’re a cash-strapped city, and scattered around town are houses where owners are behind on their property taxes.

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In August, Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy announced that the state had effectively ended chronic homelessness among Connecticut veterans. 

Through an initiative known as Zero: 2016, the state is aiming to end all chronic homelessness – the most persistent kind -- by the end of this year

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When eleven people – eight adults and three children – moved into a mansion in Hartford’s West End, neighbors cried foul.

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Standing in Hartford’s downtown library, Salvatore Pinna was over the moon. He met a woman. Life could not be sweeter.

The last time we checked on Pinna, he’d just moved into a Hartford apartment after some 20 years on the street – some of that time, literally on the street. 

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Last March, Onyeka Obiocha of Happiness Lab at the Grove coffee shop in New Haven stepped outside to find his car had been towed.

When he finally got it back and was driving home to Hartford, the car blew a head gasket. The repair bill was prohibitive, so Obiocha said goodbye to owning a car.

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Violet Thomas came out as a transgender woman three months before high school graduation in 2013. She found some respite in her guidance counselor’s office, but things went from bad to worse at home.

So Thomas left, and began moving from couch to couch among friends. But she stayed nowhere very long.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

No one is saying that Connecticut is suffering from a housing crisis, but consider this: The state has far too few rental properties, which means those that exist cost more than many residents can afford.

Meanwhile, a giant portion of the state’s work force is at or near retirement, with expected drops in income.