WNPR

Ryan Caron King

Visual + Radio Reporter

Ryan Caron King is a visual and radio reporter for Connecticut Public Radio and the New England News Collaborative, a network of eight public media newsrooms across the Northeast. 

He produces short documentary videos, portrait and documentary photography, and radio news stories.

Some of his radio work has appeared on NPR's Morning EditionHere & Now, and All Things Considered -- and his videos have been featured on NPR's Facebook page.

As a student at the University of Connecticut, he managed UConn's college radio station WHUS. Ryan graduated from UConn with a Journalism/English double major in 2015. 

Watch his most recent videos below.

For more videos, go to Connecticut Public Radio's Facebook page.

Ways to Connect

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The Walk Bridge is a century-old “swing bridge” in Norwalk that carries hundreds of trains each day along Connecticut’s southern coast.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Hartford’s hurricane relief center was where evacuees from Puerto Rico could come to get help: help finding housing, jobs, winter clothing -- whatever supplies or services they needed to restart their lives in Connecticut.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The memory of Hurricane Maria still lives with Carmen Cotto.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A coalition of activist groups, union organizers, and elected officials are calling for Yale University to disclose and cancel its holdings in Puerto Rican debt.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Brian Rivera was finishing breakfast in the lobby of the Red Room Inn in downtown Hartford. He’s been living there with his wife and two toddlers since December. And he didn’t know yet if he’d have to move out soon.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Members of Hartford’s Puerto Rican community held a rally and a candlelight vigil Friday night in front of the hotel where dozens of hurricane evacuees from the island have been living since Hurricane Maria.

Hurricane evacuees Yara Vasquez (left) and Wanda Ortiz (center) watch a press conference at the hotel they were living in with their families under a FEMA program on January 19, 2018.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The Federal Emergency Management Agency says that two dozen Puerto Rican families who relocated Hartford will no longer be eligible for housing assistance on Monday because inspections showed little or no damage to their homes in Puerto Rico.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Only days after the Federal Emergency Management Agency said it would pay for dozens of hurricane evacuees to stay in a Harford hotel until mid-February, state officials were told by FEMA on Thursday there had been an error, and that several of the families had to vacate their temporary housing. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

State officials say that several dozen Puerto Rican families who were at risk of losing federal housing assistance could now have their stay in Connecticut extended until mid-February.

Commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Correction Scott Semple speaks at a press briefing on January 8, 2018.
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Authorities say a missing inmate who escaped from the Carl Robinson Correctional Institution in Enfield may have stowed away under a state service vehicle or garbage truck.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Xiomara Vega moved to Connecticut from Puerto Rico with her three-year-old daughter after Hurricane Maria knocked out the electricity in her home. She’s trying to make a new life there, but she doesn’t want to forget her old one. And celebrating Three Kings Day -- the Christian holiday also known as the Epiphany -- is a big part of that.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Xiomara Vega se mudó a Connecticut desde Puerto Rico con su hija de tres años después de que el Huracán María cortara la electricidad en su casa. Trata de construir una nueva vida allá, pero no quiere olvidar su antigua vida. Y celebrar el Día de los Tres Reyes Magos, la celebración cristiana también conocida como la epifanía, es una gran parte de ella.

Merely Torres-Garcia has been living in a hotel room in Hartford, Conn., with her husband and two kids after losing part of her house in Puerto Rico to Hurricane Maria. She said spending the Christmas season in the northeastern cold has been hard for her family. But on Saturday night, in the noisy atrium of Hartford City Hall, it felt a little bit like Christmas on the island.

"My kids are happy. We feel like home in here right now," she said.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Merely Torres García ha vivido en una habitación de hotel en Hartford, Connecticut, con su esposo y sus dos hijos luego de perder parte de su casa en Puerto Rico por el Huracán María. Ella dijo que pasar la época de Navidad en el frío del noreste ha sido duro para la familia. Pero el sábado en la noche, en el ruidoso atrio del City Hall de Hartford, se sintió un poco como en las navidades en la isla.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Marlene Hernandez shuffled through winter coats with her cousin Kaliel Diaz at a hurricane relief center in Hartford. Diaz arrived from Puerto Rico with three other family members just days before.

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