WNPR

Patrick Skahill

Reporter

Patrick Skahill is a reporter at WNPR. He covers science with an emphasis on health care and the environment. Prior to becoming a reporter, he was the founding producer of WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show, which began in 2009 and won a PRNDI award in 2011. 

He writes about science for The Beaker. 

Patrick's reporting has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered. He worked for two years as a print reporter at Stonebridge Press in Massachusetts where he covered crime and education and has also reported for the Marketplace Morning Report. 

A graduate of Villanova University, Patrick holds a bachelor's degree in history with a concentration in Arab & Islamic Studies and a minor in Classical Studies. He holds a master's degree in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. He knows way too much about Seinfeld and is a devoted fan of comedian Hannibal Burress.

He can be reached by phone at 860-275-7297 or by email: pskahill@wnpr.org.

dianeham / Creative Commons

Buying local doesn't just need to be for produce. That's the message of a program trying to get consumers to think bigger about the so-called "locavore" lifestyle.

NAIT / Creative Commons

Connecticut has a program that allows electric customers to buy renewable energy credits. But some officials want to eliminate the program, and are getting pushback from environmentalists and the state office of Consumer Counsel.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Naloxone is a lifesaving drug that can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose. Efforts have been made in the current opioid epidemic to make it more widely available, but the medication's rising price is complicating that. 

Wikimedia Commons

As Donald Trump readies to assume the presidency in a few weeks, politicians and diplomats at home and abroad are questioning the future of environmental action. Recently, that debate came to New Haven.

FuelCell Energy, Inc.

Danbury-based FuelCell Energy, Inc., announced Thursday it will cut nearly 100 jobs, news which comes on the heels of a decision by the state to pass over several clean energy proposals submitted by the company.

FuelCell Energy, Inc.

Connecticut is home to several fuel cell manufacturers whose products are competitive on the global market, but state officials still overlooked fuel cell technology in the latest round of picks for clean energy development.

Chris Elphick

The Connecticut Audubon Society is warning of the possible extinction of one of the state's coastal birds: the saltmarsh sparrow.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Plastic today is everywhere: in our bottles and cell phones, our grocery bags, and our trash. Some plastic garbage is so small, it's impossible to see with the naked eye: tiny microbeads, which have been banned from some products because of their environmental impact. WNPR met up with a group of scientists who are looking for them, in an effort to determine how many are in the water off Connecticut's coast.

Official White House Photo by Pete Souza

The state is making more rebate money available to customers who buy electric vehicles, or EVs: $2.7 million.

scantaur/iStock / Thinkstock

A new report out of the University of Connecticut is raising concern about hospital-acquired infections from respirators.

Collection of Cornwall Historical Society, Cornwall, CT

Although charcoal is now sold at your local supermarket, the unassuming briquette's story wasn't always confined to American grills and backyards. For a long time, charcoal was the lifeblood of Connecticut’s iron industry -- fueling furnaces creating everything from weapons of war to wheels that rolled across the country. 

Dave Sizer / Creative Commons

On Friday, the Paris Agreement on climate change went into force. It provides a framework for how the U.S., China, and dozens of other countries plan to cut carbon emissions and curtail global temperature rise. But will President-elect Donald Trump support it? 

JGNY / Creative Commons

Federal environmental officials have given the go ahead for a new site in Long Island Sound where sediment dredged from the bottom of nearby harbors can be dumped. The announcement was welcomed by Connecticut's marine industries.

justgrimes / Creative Commons

The number of Hillary Clinton-sponsored advertisements in this year's general election is half of what President Barack Obama aired four years ago. And it is one third of what it was in 2012 for the Republican candidate. But lower ad volumes are just one of the many things intriguing researchers about this year's campaign.

jeroen_bennink / Creative Commons

Certain researchers are calling for greater scrutiny of how politics and technology intersect.

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