WNPR

Patrick Skahill

Reporter

Patrick Skahill is a reporter at WNPR. He covers science with an emphasis on health care and the environment. Prior to becoming a reporter, he was the founding producer of WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show, which began in 2009 and won a PRNDI award in 2011. 

He writes about science for The Beaker. 

Patrick's reporting has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered. He worked for two years as a print reporter at Stonebridge Press in Massachusetts where he covered crime and education and has also reported for the Marketplace Morning Report. 

A graduate of Villanova University, Patrick holds a bachelor's degree in history with a concentration in Arab & Islamic Studies and a minor in Classical Studies. He holds a master's degree in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. He knows way too much about Seinfeld and is a devoted fan of comedian Hannibal Burress.

He can be reached by phone at 860-275-7297 or by email: pskahill@wnpr.org.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A Norwalk mother of four who was supposed to be deported last week has instead taken refuge in a New Haven church. 

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

As Kevin Sullivan slowly rumbles his pickup truck across his 60 acres of property near the Connecticut-Massachusetts border, he leans in and asks a question: What’s farmland?

Connecticut House Democrats

The U.S. Department of Interior and the National Park Service have selected Hartford as the beneficiary of a $750,000 grant

Screenshot / WGBH

Governor Dannel Malloy’s “Second Chance Society” has reduced prison population numbers and streamlined aspects of the parole process in Connecticut. Today, about 5,000 people are supervised by parole in the state, but about a third of all parolees violate terms of their release and end up back behind bars.

Wikimedia Commons

A key committee for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a first-of-its-kind recommendation this week, unanimously signing off on an experimental cancer treatment. Research for the treatment was funded, in part, by a Connecticut nonprofit.

Pages