WNPR

Patrick Skahill

Reporter

Patrick Skahill is a reporter at WNPR. He covers science with an emphasis on health care and the environment. Prior to becoming a reporter, he was the founding producer of WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show, which began in 2009 and won a PRNDI award in 2011. 

He writes about science for The Beaker. 

Patrick's reporting has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered. He has also reported for the Marketplace Morning Report. 

A graduate of Villanova University, Patrick holds a bachelor's degree in history with a concentration in Arab & Islamic Studies and a minor in Classical Studies. He holds a master's degree in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. He knows way too much about Seinfeld.

He can be reached by phone at 860-275-7297 or by email: pskahill@wnpr.org.

joncallas / Creative Commons

Environmental and industry advocates are taking issue with a particular piece of a wide-ranging energy bill Governor Dannel Malloy plans to sign into law. The measure makes big changes to rooftop solar and a policy called “net metering.”

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

In nature, fascinating biology can be found on the edges -- intermingled habitats where biodiversity can flourish. Connecticut Public Radio recently traveled to one such edge, what’s called a “head of tide.”

wuestenigel / Creative Commons

Since 2015, nearly 70 people have died in hit-and-run crashes in Connecticut and hundreds have been injured.

A red-eared slider.
Wikimedia Commons

A bill protecting turtles in Connecticut has unanimously passed the House. The legislation seeks to carve out conservations for snapping turtles and red-eared sliders.

Margo Fontaine / Creative Commons

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced more than $8 million in “brownfield” remediation grants, money that will fund assessments and cleanups of old industrial sites throughout New England.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

A state-wide census of trail use is underway. Last year, it recorded more than 1.4 million trips taken by hikers, bikers, and others looking to get outside.

Photo Phiend / Creative Commons

The wide-open race for governor means lots of campaigns will need cash if they want to compete in November. In Connecticut, one way to do that is through public financing -- a program called the Citizens’ Election Program. But how, exactly, does the program work?

NOAA

Commercial fishing groups are joining in federal court to challenge the creation of the Atlantic Ocean's first-ever marine national monument. But the federal government is now asking for the case to be tossed out.

At stake is the future of roughly 5,000 square miles off the coast of Massachusetts, called the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

You can think of an anaerobic digester as a big metal stomach. Biodegradables go in, get composted, and turned into energy. And now, the hope is that the waste turns into a profit.

Colin Dunn / Creative Commons

A mosaic of boldly colored labels and brightly lit bottles, the vitamin aisle is as much a drug store staple as it is a monument to a multi-billion dollar industry. This hour, we trace the history of dietary supplement sales in the U.S. and consider why these supplements remain so popular today. 

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

The FBI arrested actor and comedian T.J. Miller Monday night, roughly three weeks after he allegedly called in a false bomb threat from an Amtrak train traveling into Connecticut.

Mystic Country CT (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Connecticut and New York are butting heads over a controversial decision by the federal Environmental Protection Agency to allow dumping of dredged material in Long Island Sound. It’s an unusual split between two states that have been pretty lockstep in suing the EPA.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Three developers have submitted bids to sell offshore wind to Connecticut. That could mean big things for New London's economy, but officials and advocates said the state needs to act fast to ensure it doesn't miss the boat.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Earlier this week, Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty said she will not seek re-election to a fourth term. Esty announced the decision following criticism over how she handled a workplace harassment case involving her former chief of staff.

Esty’s office eventually terminated the employee, but not before both parties signed a detailed confidentiality agreement. But in today’s #MeToo moment, those contracts are getting increased scrutiny.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A federal budget cycle akin to a wild roller coaster ride ended up boosting funding for some environmental work. With his signature last week, President Donald Trump signed into law a $1.3 trillion spending package that shores up funding for two conservation and research programs in Long Island Sound.

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