WNPR

Patrick Skahill

Reporter

Patrick Skahill is a reporter at WNPR. He covers science with an emphasis on health care and the environment. Prior to becoming a reporter, he was the founding producer of WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show, which began in 2009 and won a PRNDI award in 2011. 

He writes about science for The Beaker. 

Patrick's reporting has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered. He worked for two years as a print reporter at Stonebridge Press in Massachusetts where he covered crime and education and has also reported for the Marketplace Morning Report. 

A graduate of Villanova University, Patrick holds a bachelor's degree in history with a concentration in Arab & Islamic Studies and a minor in Classical Studies. He holds a master's degree in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. He knows way too much about Seinfeld and is a devoted fan of comedian Hannibal Burress.

He can be reached by phone at 860-275-7297 or by email: pskahill@wnpr.org.

Wikimedia Commons

A Connecticut man is traveling across the country to take in Monday’s solar eclipse from a coveted viewing spot -- above the clouds.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim wants to get public money for his campaign for governor, but the state told him no. That’s because of his past public corruption convictions.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The U.S Senate recently rejected a number of Republican plans to repeal, replace, or just overhaul the Affordable Care Act. But the health care debate is far from settled.

Lori Mack / WNPR

Lobster populations in Southern New England are in dramatic decline and recovery is not likely to happen anytime soon.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A Connecticut man convicted of a hate crime is now working to combat stereotypes about Islam.

His story, which made headlines around the world, sprang out of an attack on a mosque in Meriden in 2015.

Ed Suominen / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection is going public with updates to a plan it hopes will reduce carbon emissions and increase supplies of renewable energy.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The future of Connecticut’s only nuclear power plant is again in question. State officials are ordering a months-long review of the Millstone Power Station’s finances, while the station’s owner is indicating it may still decide to close the plant without immediate legislative support.

Stockbyte / Thinkstock

Say you break your leg. Fortunately you have insurance, so you head to an emergency room that’s in your insurance network -- and you think, at least when it comes to your medical bill, you’re all good.

But a new study out of Yale University finds you may not be.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Nury Chavarria has been in the United States for more than 20 years. Last week Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, tried to compel her return to her native Guatemala, but she sought refuge in a New Haven church.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Three members of Connecticut’s congressional delegation met on Friday with the Guatemalan mother of four who sought sanctuary from deportation in a New Haven church.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A Norwalk mother of four who was supposed to be deported last week has instead taken refuge in a New Haven church. 

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

As Kevin Sullivan slowly rumbles his pickup truck across his 60 acres of property near the Connecticut-Massachusetts border, he leans in and asks a question: What’s farmland?

Connecticut House Democrats

The U.S. Department of Interior and the National Park Service have selected Hartford as the beneficiary of a $750,000 grant

Screenshot / WGBH

Governor Dannel Malloy’s “Second Chance Society” has reduced prison population numbers and streamlined aspects of the parole process in Connecticut. Today, about 5,000 people are supervised by parole in the state, but about a third of all parolees violate terms of their release and end up back behind bars.

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A key committee for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a first-of-its-kind recommendation this week, unanimously signing off on an experimental cancer treatment. Research for the treatment was funded, in part, by a Connecticut nonprofit.

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