WNPR

Patrick Skahill

Reporter

Patrick Skahill is a reporter at WNPR. He covers science with an emphasis on health care and the environment. Prior to becoming a reporter, he was the founding producer of WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show, which began in 2009 and won a PRNDI award in 2011. 

He writes about science for The Beaker. 

Patrick's reporting has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered. He worked for two years as a print reporter at Stonebridge Press in Massachusetts where he covered crime and education and has also reported for the Marketplace Morning Report. 

A graduate of Villanova University, Patrick holds a bachelor's degree in history with a concentration in Arab & Islamic Studies and a minor in Classical Studies. He holds a master's degree in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. He knows way too much about Seinfeld and is a devoted fan of comedian Hannibal Burress.

He can be reached by phone at 860-275-7297 or by email: pskahill@wnpr.org.

Dean Hochman / Creative Commons

Connecticut's environmental watchdog has issued its annual check-in on the state's environment. The Council on Environmental Quality said the state needs to do more to meet its environmental goals.

Susan Melkisethian / Creative Commons

Scientists and science enthusiasts will stage a gathering in Hartford on Earth Day as part of the national "March for Science" event.

Dave Sizer / Creative Commons

The Commissioner of Connecticut's Department of Energy and Environmental Protection was in Washington, D.C. Thursday advocating for more controls on air pollution carried by prevailing winds into the Northeast.

Wikimedia Commons

Millions of river herring used to return to New England's fresh waterways to spawn, but at some collection spots today, populations have dropped into the dozens. 

Jamiesrabbits / Creative Commons

President Donald Trump's nominee to head the Food and Drug Administration was before Congress this week. Scott Gottlieb wants a quicker approval process for new drugs, but a new study said the FDA already works faster than its peer agency in Europe.

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