Lucy Nalpathanchil

Host/Reporter

Lucy is a Reporter and Host for mid-day programming on WNPR including Here and Now. She began her career at the station as the Assignment Editor and also hosted All Things Considered for several years.  She contributes to National Public Radio and her stories have aired on several national NPR shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.     

During her time in Connecticut, Lucy has focused on immigration including New Haven's controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the Becoming American series: stories of immigrants and the citizenship process.  In 2011, Lucy launched the Coming Home Project to tell the stories of returning Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans in transition. To learn more about the military, Lucy was chosen to take part in a week-long training for journalists hosted by the U.S Army at Fort Leavenworth, KS and Fort Leonard Woods, MO. Getting up at 3:30 am to participate in boot camp was most memorable! 

In September of 2014, she was selected to join military reporters around the country for a conference hosted by the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative in Washington D.C.

Lucy has worked in several states as a public radio reporter after beginning her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. She's received awards from Pennsylvania's Golden Quill, the New York State Associated Press, the Mayor's Asian American Advisory Board in Jacksonville, Florida, the Connecticut Associated Press and the state's Society for Professional Journalists chapter.

When she's not in the newsroom, Lucy enjoys traveling, hiking, and planning her next garden. She lives in Middletown with her family which includes two talented dogs, Sidney and Lily.

Ways to Connect

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

A new play premieres Thursday night at the Yale Cabaret that brings together Iraqi and Afghan refugees and U.S. veterans who tell their stories.

Lucy Nalpathanchil

Over the past three years, juvenile court judges in Connecticut handled 6,900 cases on average. 

Catie Talarski / WNPR

Two Connecticut Army veterans are in Washington D.C. on Wednesday as their all Puerto Rican unit, the 65th Infantry Regiment, known as the Borinqueneers, are awarded the Congressional Gold Medal -- the highest honor Congress can award to civilians. 

Photo Phiend / Creative Commons

The first round of layoff notices have been given out to state workers as Governor Dannel Malloy works to confront looming deficits.

Tom Berry

Later this month, Yale Cabaret will cast its spotlight on a unique "troupe" of New Haven performers: veterans and refugees who experienced the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan from very different places. This hour, we hear their stories and learn about their play "Voices from the Long War." 

Andrew Seaman / Creative Commons

It's been 16 years since Connecticut passed its Safe Haven law to protect newborns. The state Department of Children and Families says in that time, 27 babies have been brought to local hospitals.

NorwichBulletin.com

The federal government deports thousands of people from the U.S. each year. Number one on its priority list are violent criminals.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

On Monday, March 28, a federal judge may rule on whether immigration officials must allow two former Connecticut residents back into the country to talk about why they were deported. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The Department of Children and Families ordered a suicide prevention audit after the Child Advocate issued a critical report last summer over conditions at the Connecticut Juvenile Training School for boys and the Pueblo unit for girls in Middletown.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

More than 2,000 students from Connecticut and across the northeast are attending the True Colors annual conference this weekend at the UConn Storrs campus.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission / Creative Commons

New York City and Westchester County both get power from the Indian Point nuclear plant on the banks of the Hudson River. But the plant's age, and a series of problems at the facility, have led to questions about its future. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Now that Governor Dannel Malloy has pegged July 1, 2018 as the deadline to close the Connecticut Juvenile Training School, the state Department of Children and Families must come up with a plan on how to do it and still serve delinquent youth in its custody. 

Malglam via Flickr.com / Creative Commons

The first milk bank in the state has opened in Guilford. It's a place where mothers in Connecticut can donate their breast milk.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

In December, the Commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Correction captured the attention of criminal justice reform advocates with a proposal for a new facility solely for 18-to-25-year-olds. It's part of a string of initiatives under the leadership of Scott Semple.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Immigration reform is a hot topic this presidential election year. Often, the question of who’s living here illegally centers on the many immigrants who cross the country's southern border. But the federal government deports people from countries across the globe. That includes a Connecticut woman who in three months must leave the country and her family. 

CT Senate Democrats / Creative Commons

On Thursday, Governor Dannel Malloy said Connecticut has ended veteran homelessness in the state. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Residents who need help paying for child care can apply for state assistance but homeless families often don't meet the guidelines to be eligible for the program.

CT Senate Democrats/Creative Commons

Should Connecticut require paid family and medical leave? The state Department of Labor will report back to lawmakers this legislative session on how the state could implement the proposed law. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

With another legislative session about to begin, Governor Dannel Malloy has announced new proposals under his Second Chance Society initiative. One of his ideas will change how the state defines a juvenile delinquent.

Rep. Esty's office

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty says progress is being made in Afghanistan. She recently returned from a visit there and to Kuwait as part of a bipartisan delegation. 

Cyclonebiskit / Creative Commons

Connecticut has received a $54 million federal grant to improve shoreline infrastructure and make portions of the state more resilient.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A court monitor said the state is failing to meet critical measurements because of a lack of funding.

The U.S. Army via Flickr / Creative Commons

Almost two years ago, advocates filed a class action lawsuit against the Department of Defense seeking records for how often veterans with "other than honorable" or "bad" discharges applied for discharge upgrades due to their PTSD diagnoses. Now the DOD will be turning over that information.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty, who represents an area of the state that includes Newtown, will be in attendance Tuesday night during President Barack Obama's final State of the Union address. 

Appearing on WNPR's Where We Live, Esty praised the president's executive actions announced last week.

Connecticut VA Healthcare System

The federal Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is investigating the death of a patient who was found in a public bathroom at the West Haven VA hospital last month. 

Lori Mack / WNPR

Immigration activists held a rally on Wednesday in New Haven against plans by federal officials to round up Central Americans who have recently crossed the border illegally. 

Stephen Dunn / WNPR

The debate over who should be allowed into the U.S. continues to dominate headlines, most recently at last week's Republican presidential debate. All of the GOP candidates said they oppose the Obama administration's plans to permit 10,000 more Syrian refugees into the country. Syrians living in Connecticut are following the rhetoric closely. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Naval Submarine Base New London has a new leader. U.S. Navy Captain Paul Whitescarver, formerly of Norfolk, Virginia, is the SUBASE's new commanding officer.

Cpl. Damany S. Coleman lejeune.marines.mil / Creative Commons

Several veterans groups have filed a Freedom of Information request seeking records about a Veterans Affairs (VA) program that decides disability compensation claims related to toxic water exposure. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Pentagon has announced it will send additional Special Operations forces to Iraq and Syria to help defeat the so-called Islamic State. The news shouldn't be a surprise according to Connecticut's U.S. Senator Chris Murphy, but he said it is concerning.

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