Lori Mack

Senior Producer

Lori is Senior Producer for the award-winning Faith Middleton Show.

She came to WNPR after working as News Operations Coordinator for WCBS Radio in New York City, covering stories for one of the nation's largest AM news stations. She went on to work as a reporter and afternoon news anchor with WWYZ and WATR in Waterbury, Connecticut. Lori also helped to start a morning drive show for the Fox News Radio Network in New York.

She lives in Branford with her daughter and The Dog from Hell.

Ways to Connect

Advantages of ADHD

Aug 24, 2015
mararie/flickr creative commons

ADHD is said to be the most overly diagnosed and medicated condition in mental health. In just twenty years there’s been a tripling of ADHD rates. It is now diagnosed in 11% of children ages 4 through 17, with about half of those kids on medication. 

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Travis Hugh Culley is an author and a playwright. He holds an MFA in writing from the Art Institute of Chicago, which is remarkable, since Culley was illiterate until about age 17. 

elhombredenegro/flickr creative commons

We all depend on technology and its vast, positive potential on everything from poverty to medicine, but there’s a flip side. As we gear up for the Internet of Things, with greater connections come greater risks. 

Lori Mack / WNPR

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch was in Connecticut on Tuesday as part of a national community policing tour.

Licking the Sugar Habit

Jul 20, 2015
Michael Allen Smith/flickr creative commons

Americans consume more than 70 pounds of sugar a year and it's making us fat, unhealthy, and lazy. We know sugar's linked to things like heart disease, type II diabetes, and Alzheimer's, yet we can't seem to quit the habit. 

Phil Campbell/flickr creative commons

Cellphones, and now smartphones and mobile tablets, have changed our world in wonderful ways, connecting us anywhere and everywhere. And time has flown. Simple cell phones are disappearing as smartphones and tablets get smarter and cheaper. Meanwhile our own communication habits are changing. According to Pew Internet reports, over 70 percent of Americans now prefer texting over calling.

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Deprive a newborn baby of loving touch and the consequences are dramatic. In fact, touch deprivation can lead to a broad range of developmental problems that, if left uncorrected, will most likely carryover into adulthood. Neuroscientist David Linden tells us touch is not optional for human development.

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 Milk, we've been told, is a good source of calcium, provides protein, vitamins, and other nutrients. It's also becoming a source of controversy among parents, doctors, and scientists. We need calcium for bone health and while other foods, like spinach and broccoli, contain calcium milk has been thought to be an efficient vehicle for delivery. What the research tells us about milk is confusing at best. In fact, according to some studies, too much dairy can actually be harmful to our health.

Karyl Evans Productions/Facebook

The late John Meneely Jr., a Yale Medical School graduate, struggled to rebuild his life after returning home from World War II. His daughters have created an oratorio to commemorate their father, and the making of that oratorio is the subject of a new documentary called Letter from Italy 1944: A New American Oratorio, narrated by Meryl Streep. It airs this Thursday, June 18th, at 8pm on CPTV. We talk with the film’s director, Karyl Evans.

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Back in the days when rock and roll was still young and three-chord bands were popping up everywhere, The Grateful Dead were unique in just about every way. They fused multiple music styles: rock, blues, folk, R&B, country, jazz, and, of course, more than a peppering of psychedelia.

Andrei Taranchenko/flickr creative commons

Haines, Alaska is a small town situated in the northern part of the Alaska Panhandle. It's home to abundant wildlife and the scenery is breathtaking. Haines has a population of about 2,000. There's a public radio station there and a weekly paper called The Chilkat Valley News, where Heather Lende's been writing obituaries for the last two decades. 

David Sepulveda

Alexander Calder, Swoon, BiP, and Claes Oldenburg are among the artists whose works make up the rich tapestry of outdoor art in New Haven. And if you’re not sure where they are?… There’s a web app for that.

Mara Lavitt / WNPR

Ted Kennedy Jr., son of the late U.S. Senator Edward Kennedy, is making his first bid for political office in Connecticut. But the campaign has not been without some controversy.

Trevor Snapp

Once in a while, your past catches up to you. That might not be a good thing if long ago, you were up to no good. But if, as a teenager, you had been part of a talented folk-rock band called Hand, and today you found out that a recording you made back then had become a collector’s item, and that your music was on iTunes, and that music lovers and record-producers were looking for you -- it just might make your day.

Jirka Matousek / Creative Commons

The Common Core has been a big part of this year’s campaign for governor -- and a rallying cry for teachers, parents and students. But new documentary looks at what’s really in the common core that might provide some common ground between many sides on the education reform debate. 

Nearly 150 pieces of artwork from established Connecticut artists will go home with new owners this weekend as part of the "Somewhat Off the Wall" art show in New Haven.

Jonf728/flickr creative commons

Science still can't say for sure why we need sleep, though we spend a third of our lives asleep, or trying to sleep. Those trying to sleep include the millions who have some sort of sleep issue, from insomnia to over-sleeping.

Successfully erotic sex scenes are notoriously difficult to write, but novelist Amy Bloom has hit the jackpot in her new novel, Lucky Us, featuring one of the most glamorous orgy scenes of all time. The irresistibly steamy Hollywood party involves a roomful of stars and starlets dancing, flirting, and seducing in the old Hollywood of the 1940s.

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Carving birds? Knitting sweaters? Paper cutting? Blowing glass? If you're a crafts person, paid or unpaid, please call and tell us what it adds to your life.

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Bánh … the name might be new to you, but we hope you'll try the sandwich that is the rage coast to coast. It has amazing, explosive flavor, the kind you want again and again. It sounds weird, we know, and you might think, how good can this be?

Tadson Bussey/flickr creative commons

A chair… letter… diary… clock… coin… jewel… car… house… meat grinder… what makes a family heirloom have powerful meaning, even if it has little monetary value? That question will be answered when you read The Smithsonian's History of America in 101 Objects by Richard Kurin.

Penn State/flickr creative commons

The "doyenne of civility," Judith Martin, a.k.a. Miss Manners, has decided that the fast-changing modern workplace could use some tips on what is and is not okay. And she delivers it in her characteristic dry, witty way, in the book she has co-authored with her son, Nicholas Ivor Martin, Miss Manners Minds Your Business.

Marcy Kellar/flickr creative commons

Is it even possible, you might be wondering, to like all parts of a vacation, including re-entry? We think so. Our senior contributor, New Haven psychologist Nancy Horn, explains what goes into making vacation a less stressful experience, and also less about perfection. This is one of those podcasts worth listening to.

Mike McCune/flickr creative commons

Every shrimp gets a leaf of fresh basil and together they're wrapped in a slice of prosciutto and grilled; the outside gets crispy, and the shrimp is succulent. The flavor trio of basil against sweet shrimp and salty prosciutto is fantastic. Sprinkle a little sugar on fresh peach halves before grilling and you get caramelized beauties to go with your prosciutto-wrapped shrimp and basil. We adore this dish, it's so easy, and you can prep it before your guests arrive. No grill? No worries! The whole thing can be done in a cast-iron skillet indoors.

Johan Hansson/flickr creative commons

This hour: a call-in on great ideas past, present, and future. Tell us about things in technology, psychology, science, education, art, culture, and design that rank as great ideas. If it's not invented yet, tell us what you dream of—you never know who's listening. The world is filled with great ideas; it's fun and interesting to notice them. Many more are on the way from Apple and others.

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This hour: the way the thoughts we have and the decisions we make are influenced by forces that aren't always in our control.

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Celebrate someone you know, even a stranger who offered some kindness. Was a nurse or doctor there for you, a teacher, a neighbor, your mate, or a friend? Today we pay tribute and remember the goodness of ordinary people.

Mike/flickr creative commons

On this fresh edition of The Food Schmooze: Ariston's Pizza-Flavored Olive Oil, and how farmers' markets are booming right now, including the full-service North End weekly market in Hartford. Cook corn on the cob in your microwave, and don't miss a recipe for mouth-watering, no-bake chocolate mousse pie. Make your salmon fantastic with a simple recipe for fresh peach-jalapeño salsa.

Jesslee Cuizon/flickr creative commons

Since the days are speeding by we thought, hey, let's celebrate summer. What is it about this season that is worth noticing, that makes us happier? Breezes, food, gardens, friends, sex, parties, swim, seersucker, the new and tradition. Celebrate summer with us.

FutUndBeidl/flickr creative commons

We focus this hour on one of the nation's most respected clinicians and researchers working with teens and adults who have ADHD. Dr. Thomas E. Brown is Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine, and Associate Director of the Yale Clinic for Attention and Related Disorders. (There is sometimes a link between ADHD and autism.)

Dr. Brown's new book, Smart but Stuck, looks at how managing emotions plays a key role in the lives of those with ADHD, including those who have high I.Q. scores.

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