WNPR

Lori Mack

Reporter

Lori is a reporter for WNPR.

She came to WNPR after working as News Operations Coordinator for WCBS Radio in New York City, covering stories for one of the nation's largest AM news stations. She went on to work as a reporter and afternoon news anchor with WWYZ and WATR in Waterbury, Connecticut. Lori also helped to start a morning drive show for the Fox News Radio Network in New York.

She lives in Branford with her daughter.

Ways to Connect

WNHH FM / New Haven Independent

Legendary Connecticut shoreline reporter Marcia Chambers has passed away. Chambers, who lived in Branford, died Friday at Smilow Cancer Hospital. 

Zairys Maysonet

Over 30 Jewish, Muslim, and Christian teenagers came together on the New Haven Green Tuesday to paint a 48-foot sign welcoming refugees. 

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

A recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling struck a blow to public sector unions. But some union leaders say they’re hopeful the blowback may actually strengthen their organizations.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

A new unit at Connecticut's York Correctional Institution was formally unveiled Monday. The specialized unit focuses on preparing young women offenders for life after prison.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Two immigrant children are suing the federal government after being separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border and transported 2,000 miles to Connecticut.

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

The recent retirement announcement of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy has sparked questions about the future of abortion rights. During his tenure, Kennedy voted to uphold abortion rights in several cases. Now agencies like New Haven’s Planned Parenthood of Southern New England are worried that the Trump administration will seek to appoint a justice who will overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision, the ruling that established a woman’s constitutional right to abortion.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Police officials said more than 17 background reports were falsified by former officers Leah Russo and Kristian Ramirez. The two were partners in conducting background investigations for incoming police candidates.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

A report released by New Haven’s Long Wharf Theatre said the blame for a sexual misconduct scandal at the venue lies with the behavior of a single powerful person. 

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

Officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency are assessing the damage caused by multiple tornadoes and storms that hit Connecticut last month. Two people died and more than 120,000 homes and businesses lost power.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Public safety concerns in a portion of New Haven have led to a duck hunting ban. The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection announced that they’ve closed the area along the Quinnipiac River in New Haven to hunting for one year. During that time, DEEP will conduct a study and make a recommendation. 

THOMAS HAWK / CREATIVE COMMONS

Lawmakers in Washington are attempting to overhaul the criminal justice system. Their aim is to find a solution to mass incarceration and reduce recidivism rates. But one expert doesn’t think the measure goes far enough. 

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

A commencement ceremony was held Monday at the Willard-Cybulski Correctional Institution in Enfield, where six incarcerated students graduated with certificates in advanced machine technology.

JENN VARGAS/FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

As Connecticut sees fewer people behind bars and a drop in crime rates, officials say there’s some concern over the lack of services for those transitioning to the outside.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The Connecticut Insurance Department has activated its emergency adjuster program following Tuesday’s powerful storms. This will allow insurance companies to bring out-of-state adjusters to help expedite claims.

scyther5 / iStock

Seniors lose billions of dollars a year to financial fraud, ranging from mass mailings and threatening robocalls, to telemarketing and identity theft. Experts around the country, including Connecticut, are focused on combating the problem. 

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