WNPR

Harriet Jones

Reporter/Editor

Harriet Jones reports on all aspects of the business world for WNPR. She's covered such diverse issues as the threat to close Connecticut's submarine base, the sub prime mortgage crisis and the impact of casinos on the state.

In 2011, she created WNPR's Small Business Project as a way to tell stories about the companies that make up 90 percent of our economy, but often get overlooked in the media.

She is the winner of an Edward R. Murrow award for her reporting on Connecticut's 2010 floods.

Harriet joined WNPR in October 2000 as Morning Edition producer and reporter. Born in Scotland, she worked for the BBC for much of her early career.

She was news director at Scotland's largest commercial radio station, ScotFM, and was lucky enough to cover that country's two biggest political events in 300 years - the referendum which delivered a new parliament, and the subsequent elections.

She has also taught broadcasting for the BBC at some of their international schools in Eastern Europe, delivering courses to journalists in Romania, Albania and Bosnia.

Harriet lives in Stonington with her husband, Bob Statchen, and their three children.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Connecticut Senate has passed a bill that would close the state’s fiscal deficit for this year. The unanimously approved measure plugs a $317 million hole, mostly by drawing on the state’s rainy day fund.

creative commons

Advocates for the state's low income families say budget proposals to cut the earned income tax credit, or EITC, will have a negative effect on the economy and make the tax code less fair. 

e-Magine Art / Creative Commons

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy said Thursday he might veto legislation aimed at providing more price transparency over prescription drugs. 

MMCT

The state Senate in Connecticut has approved a new satellite casino to be built in East Windsor by a joint partnership of the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribes. The measure passed 24-12 early Wednesday morning, marking a big step in a potential expansion of gambling in the state. 

Gubcio / iStock / Thinkstock

There's been a lot of focus lately on how revisions to federal health insurance laws may affect people on state exchanges like the one in Connecticut. But in fact, repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act won’t just alter the landscape for consumers on the exchanges -- it’s certain to have a big impact on employer plans too. 

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