WNPR

Harriet Jones

Reporter/Editor

Harriet Jones reports on all aspects of the business world for WNPR. She's covered such diverse issues as the threat to close Connecticut's submarine base, the sub prime mortgage crisis and the impact of casinos on the state.

In 2011, she created WNPR's Small Business Project as a way to tell stories about the companies that make up 90 percent of our economy, but often get overlooked in the media.

She is the winner of an Edward R. Murrow award for her reporting on Connecticut's 2010 floods.

Harriet joined WNPR in October 2000 as Morning Edition producer and reporter. Born in Scotland, she worked for the BBC for much of her early career.

She was news director at Scotland's largest commercial radio station, ScotFM, and was lucky enough to cover that country's two biggest political events in 300 years - the referendum which delivered a new parliament, and the subsequent elections.

She has also taught broadcasting for the BBC at some of their international schools in Eastern Europe, delivering courses to journalists in Romania, Albania and Bosnia.

Harriet lives in Stonington with her husband, Bob Statchen, and their three children.

MMCT

Governor Dannel Malloy has signed into law a measure that would allow the state’s two federally recognized tribes to build and run a third casino. But the legislation looks certain to attract legal action.

Connecticut Senate Republicans / Creative Commons

After weeks of voting, unionized state employees have overwhelmingly approved a labor concessions package that's expected to provide $1.5 billion in savings for the over the next two years. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal said Democrats remain implacably opposed to the Republicans’ latest version of health care reform. A rewritten bill was released Thursday, in an effort to bring on board wavering senators from both conservative and moderate wings of the Republican party. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The Federal Railroad Administration announced Wednesday that it won’t go ahead with a controversial plan to re-route a major rail artery in Connecticut and Rhode Island.

City of Stamford

Job search website Indeed says it will create more jobs in Stamford, adding 500 positions to its current workforce of 700 and making an investment of $26.5 million in its offices. 

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