WNPR

Diane Orson

Managing Editor/Host

Diane Orson is WNPR's local host for Morning Edition.  She's also a reporter and managing editor for WNPR, as well as a contributor to National Public Radio. Her stories are heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here And Now.  Diane began at WBUR in Boston and came to Connecticut in 1988 as a co-producer for Open Air New England.  She shared a Peabody Award with Faith Middleton for their piece of radio nostalgia about New Haven's Shubert Theater.  Her reporting has  been recognized by the Connecticut Society for Professional Journalists and the Associated Press, including the Ellen Abrams Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism and the Walt Dibble Award for Overall Excellence.

Diane is also an active professional musician. She lives in Hamden with her husband and two children.

New Britain Museum of American Art

An exhibition of prints by surrealist artist Salvador Dali opens Friday at the New Britain Museum of American Art

Maxim Zolotukhin / World Bank

In her new book, The Importance of Being Little: What Preschoolers Really Need From Grownups, author Erika Christakis said young children are working more and learning less. 

Kathleen T. Rhem / Creative Commons

A military justice expert from Yale Law School said the president’s comments on closing the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay are a first step in an effort to get the American people behind him on the issue.

Longwharf Theatre

Sadie Delany, 103, and Bessie Delany, 101, were daughters of a former slave and grew up in the Jim Crow South. 

Gaida / Facebook

Syrian singer and songwriter Gaida is featured this Friday evening at Wesleyan University. Gaida performs innovative interpretations of traditional Syrian songs -- improvisations over Arabic grooves -- and she composes original music.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The 2016 presidential race is shaping up to be unusual, including in the decreased impact advertising has on polling.

Brian Owens

During the day, 24-year-old Brian Owens is a design engineer at a local Connecticut contracting firm. After hours, he creates art.

Yoichi R. Okamoto / Creative Commons

Back in the 1940s, the NAACP sent a young black lawyer named Thurgood Marshall to Bridgeport, Connecticut to defend a black chauffeur against his wealthy employer in a sensational sexual assault trial that grabbed newspaper headlines.

That story is the basis of a new film called "Marshall," which is just beginning production in Hollywood.

Christine Olson / Creative Commons

An oceanographer who helped solve the mystery of last summer’s explosion on a crowded Rhode Island beach said there’s a very low risk of the same type of explosion occurring again.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

In a preliminary vote Thursday night, musicians of the Hartford Symphony Orchestra rejected — by secret ballot — a labor offer and wage cuts proposed by HSO management.  

Michael Iamele / Soul de Cuba Café

American Airlines and Jet Blue have announced plans to offer scheduled flights to Cuba. This follows last week’s new agreement on commercial flights between the island nation and the United States. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A documentary airing Thursday night on CPTV tells the story of American soldiers stationed in Luxembourg during World War II who, without realizing it, helped to create a new holiday tradition. 

Ross MacDonald

Flags are at half-staff in Connecticut on Monday on the anniversary of the mass shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown in 2012.

City of Milford Adaptive Recreation / Facebook

Adaptive arts link those with disabilities to artistic expression. This Friday, the city of Milford’s Recreation Department partners with the New England Ballet Company for the sixth annual production of "The Nutcracker Suite."

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The U.S. House of Representatives has approved a wide-ranging bill to revise the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, also known as "No Child Left Behind."

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