WNPR

Diane Orson

Managing Editor/Host

Diane Orson is WNPR's local host for Morning Edition.  She's also a reporter and managing editor for WNPR, as well as a contributor to National Public Radio. Her stories are heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here And Now.  Diane began at WBUR in Boston and came to Connecticut in 1988 as a co-producer for Open Air New England.  She shared a Peabody Award with Faith Middleton for their piece of radio nostalgia about New Haven's Shubert Theater.  Her reporting has  been recognized by the Connecticut Society for Professional Journalists and the Associated Press, including the Ellen Abrams Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism and the Walt Dibble Award for Overall Excellence.

Diane is also an active professional musician. She lives in Hamden with her husband and two children.

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President Trump's revised executive order makes several changes to the earlier version that was rejected by the courts. It takes Iraq off the list, but some Muslims in Connecticut said it has the same underlying theme.

Courtesy Joe Coss

The job of a public announcer is unique. Joe Coss of Connecticut Public Broadcasting was making calls at Daytona 500 last week, and fresh off the plane, he came into our studio to talk about it.

Duffman / Creative Commons

Hundreds of undocumented immigrants have been rounded up during raids in major cities across the country in the past week. Immigration and Customs Enforcement reported more than 680 people were arrested nationwide, including 41 in New York City. ICE called the actions part of "routine, daily targeted operations."

GK / Creative Commons

Yale University has reversed course and announced that it will change the name of Calhoun College. This follows protests at the Ivy League campus over names and symbols related to slavery and oppression.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen said he’s thrilled that an appeals court has unanimously rejected the Trump administration’s effort to resume a controversial executive order, barring people from seven majority-Muslim countries from entering the United States.

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