WNPR

Diane Orson

Managing Editor/Host

Diane Orson is WNPR's local host for Morning Edition.  She's also a reporter and managing editor for WNPR, as well as a contributor to National Public Radio. Her stories are heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here And Now.  Diane began at WBUR in Boston and came to Connecticut in 1988 as a co-producer for Open Air New England.  She shared a Peabody Award with Faith Middleton for their piece of radio nostalgia about New Haven's Shubert Theater.  Her reporting has  been recognized by the Connecticut Society for Professional Journalists and the Associated Press, including the Ellen Abrams Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism and the Walt Dibble Award for Overall Excellence.

Diane is also an active professional musician. She lives in Hamden with her husband and two children.

Haitians living in the U.S. legally under what’s known as Temporary Protected Status by the Trump administration that they must make arrangements to leave the country within 18 months.

But a Connecticut immigration attorney said it makes no sense to end Temporary Protected Status for Haiti – a country vulnerable to natural disasters and one of the poorest nations in the world.

Ten nations are currently granted TPS status. These are countries where environmental disasters, armed conflict, and other conditions make it extraordinarily difficult for residents to live safely.

John Harris / FiGa Films

The annual Latino and Iberian Film Festival is underway at Yale University in New Haven this week. There will be dozens of screenings. Filmmakers from across Latin America are in the city.

Thinkstock

A wave of sexual harassment scandals nationwide has prompted a re-examination of harassment training in the workplace.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Voter registration numbers have been released and there are about 125,000 new registrants ahead of Tuesday’s municipal elections in the state.

Access Health CT

Open enrollment to buy health insurance through the Affordable Care Act exchanges began Wednesday, but the enrollment period this time around is shorter than ever.

Chion Wolf

The ensemble Cuatro Puntos sees music as a catalyst for change. The group, which is based in Connecticut, performs and teaches around the world. The ensemble often collaborates with members of local communities during performances.

Research shows girls and boys perform equally well in science, technology, engineering and math while in school. But that doesn't always follow into careers in the STEM workforce where, particularly in certain fields, there's still a gender gap.

Mstyslav Chernov / Wikimedia Commons

Eleven human rights activists – including the Turkish director of Amnesty International – are to face trial next week on terrorism charges in Turkey. They are among the thousands of people swept up in a huge crackdown in the country, following last year’s attempted coup that left at least 240 people dead.

Yoichi Robert Okamoto / Creative Commons

The film “Marshall” opens in theaters nationwide on Friday. The screenplay was written by Connecticut attorney Michael Koskoff and his son Jacob.

AJ Zanyk / Creative Commons

It's been 60 years since singer Harry Belafonte released The Banana Boat Song (Day-O) on vinyl. He had spent much of his youth in Jamaica and has said he chose to sing the traditional island work song as a way to challenge negative cultural assumptions about people of the Caribbean.

Diane Orson / WNPR

One week after Hurricane Maria pummeled Puerto Rico, the U.S. Defense Department said 80 percent of the island’s electricity lines are damaged and nearly half its residents are without drinking water.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A little over a year ago, Superior Court Judge Thomas Moukawsher issued a sweeping decision in a landmark education lawsuit centered on the way Connecticut funds its public schools.

New York National Guard

Marty Goldberg has run a grocery store on the U.S. Virgin Island of St. Thomas since 1975, and he called Hurricane Irma the absolute worst storm he’s ever seen.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The late Connecticut sculptor David Hayes liked seeing his work out in the public space. He wanted people to be able to move in and around his large, abstract steel pieces and discover the art’s meaning for themselves.

Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

A public comment period has just closed on a proposal by the Trump administration to expand drilling along the U.S. Atlantic coast.  

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