WNPR

Diane Orson

Managing Editor/Host

Diane Orson is WNPR's local host for Morning Edition.  She's also a reporter and managing editor for WNPR, as well as a contributor to National Public Radio. Her stories are heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here And Now.  Diane began at WBUR in Boston and came to Connecticut in 1988 as a co-producer for Open Air New England.  She shared a Peabody Award with Faith Middleton for their piece of radio nostalgia about New Haven's Shubert Theater.  Her reporting has  been recognized by the Connecticut Society for Professional Journalists and the Associated Press, including the Ellen Abrams Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism and the Walt Dibble Award for Overall Excellence.

Diane is also an active professional musician. She lives in Hamden with her husband and two children.

Melanie Barocas

Back in the days of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, ballroom dancing was all the rage. Then came the 1960s, when partner-dancing moved off to the sidelines. But ballroom is back on the dance floor – both socially, and increasingly as a competitive sport.

It's Complicated
Roberta Friedman

This week saw the end of an era in Cuba, as Raul Castro stepped down from the presidency on Thursday. During the island’s decades of comparative isolation, film and art have offered rare glimpses into life in Cuba.

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Picture Group 034

One of Connecticut’s most highly decorated World War I veterans is featured in a new animated film, opening in theaters nationwide Friday. He warned his fellow soldiers of a possible gas attack, located wounded men in the field, and even helped to catch an enemy spy hidden in the Allied trenches.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Walt Disney’s hit film "Black Panther" broke new ground as the first mainstream superhero movie with a predominantly black cast and plenty of strong leading women. The film’s music also opens new doors: introducing authentic African sounds into an action-packed Marvel movie score. Central to those sounds is the talking drum from West Africa which can be heard sailing above many of the orchestral and choral arrangements.

Garry Monk, executive director of the National Veterans Council for Legal Redress speaks in Hartford with Sen. Chris Murphy looking on.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Inside the omnibus appropriations bill recently signed into law is legislation that, for the first time, provides mental health care for tens of thousands of combat veterans and sexual assault victims who’ve received other-than-honorable discharges.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Six months after Hurricane Maria, the recovery effort in Puerto Rico is well underway. Still, the island  faces many critical long-term challenges.

Sheila Hayre, visiting associate professor at Quinnipiac University School of Law, Congolese Artist Toto Kisaku and law students Thai Chhay and Brendan Lawless.
Quinnipiac University

A Middletown resident who was incarcerated in his native Democratic Republic of Congo for creating political theater has been just granted asylum in the U.S. This comes as the Trump administration is making moves to limit who gets asylum.

Hand dryers in Milford, Connecticut.
Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Are bathroom hot air hand dryers a better choice than paper towels?

Babe Ruth in his first year with the New York Yankees in 1920.
Paul Thompson / Public Domain

Seventy years after Babe Ruth's death, a long-lost radio interview with the baseball legend has turned up in the archives of Cheshire Academy, a private school in Connecticut. It's part of a collection of interviews donated two decades ago by sports announcer Joe Hasel, an alumnus of the school.

Composer Nathan Fletcher.
Courtesy Nathan Fletcher

A short-form chamber opera composed by Connecticut native Nathan Fletcher recently premiered at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. Fletcher’s music blends traditional classical styles with influences from musical theater and film.

Neil McIntyre / Creative Commons

With the start of the baseball season still weeks away, plenty of Connecticut Red Sox fans have a chance to mingle with their favorite players this weekend.

Diane Orson / WNPR

Thousands of Salvadoran immigrants in Connecticut and Massachusetts will find out by Monday whether their legal status in the U.S. will be extended or revoked. Some have lived in the U.S. for nearly two decades, and many don’t know what they’ll do if they’re told to leave.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim, who served nearly seven years in prison for corruption, filed paperwork Wednesday to launch his campaign for governor.

DVIDSHUB (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Amid a cascade of workplace sexual harassment and assault allegations across the country, the military is facing scrutiny for its handling of complaints.

Diane Orson / WNPR

Hundreds of Honduran immigrants in Connecticut and Massachusetts will find out in the coming months whether they’ll be allowed to stay in the U.S. or face possible deportation. This comes as violent protests continue in Honduras following a contested presidential election.

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