Diane Orson

Managing Editor/Host

Diane Orson is WNPR's local host for Morning Edition.  She's also a reporter and managing editor for WNPR, as well as a contributor to National Public Radio. Her stories are heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here And Now.  Diane began at WBUR in Boston and came to Connecticut in 1988 as a co-producer for Open Air New England.  She shared a Peabody Award with Faith Middleton for their piece of radio nostalgia about New Haven's Shubert Theater.  Her reporting has  been recognized by the Connecticut Society for Professional Journalists and the Associated Press, including the Ellen Abrams Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism and the Walt Dibble Award for Overall Excellence.

Diane is also an active professional musician. She lives in Hamden with her husband and two children.

Mohamed Azakir / World Bank flickr.com/photos/worldbank / World Bank

Connecticut Representative Joe Courtney has been pressed to defend his vote last week with the Republican majority in the House to strengthen the vetting procedure for Syrian refugees entering the U.S.

Muslim Coalition of Connecticut‎ / Facebook

An event this weekend in Hartford honors people and institutions of higher education that have worked to build bridges between Muslims and their larger community.

Danielle Mailer

From brilliantly colored fish to dancing cats to sensual silhouettes of the female form, the art of Connecticut’s Danielle Mailer spans painting, sculpture – and now – large public art projects.

Eleazar Castillo / thehandthatfeedsfilm.com

The Latino and Iberian Film Festival opened Wednesday at Yale University with scheduled screenings of about 50 movies.

JECO Photo / Creative Commons

Across the U.S., low-income, first-generation college students are not graduating at the same rate as some of their wealthier peers. 

Chris Beckett / Creative Commons

Federal, state, and local authorities have announced the formation of a task force to fight human and child sex trafficking in the state.

George Chochos.

Lawmakers in Washington are considering federal criminal justice reform legislation, as some 6,000 inmates are released nationwide, part of the largest one-time release of federal prisoners in U.S. history.

An ex-offender from Connecticut is in Washington, DC today to tell his story as part of Senate and House briefings with faith leaders.

Carol Rosegg / Yale Repertory Theater

Yale Repertory Theater is currently presenting the world premiere of the play "Indecent."

Creative Commons

Connecticut’s students score well overall on standardized tests. But lower-income minority students in urban areas continue to lag behind their classmates. 

Edward flickr.com/photos/glasgows / Creative Commons

A state gun rights group said it will appeal this week’s federal ruling upholding stricter firearms laws passed in Connecticut and New York, after the 2012 mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Bullets flew outside a campaign office of Bridgeport Democratic mayoral candidate Joe Ganim Thursday. Ganim has made reducing violence a theme of his campaign.

The candidate was not at the office at the time. There were no injuries reported.

Charlie Smart / WHUS

Former President Bill Clinton spoke to a crowd at the University of Connecticut on Thursday. He was a co-recipient of the the Thomas J. Dodd Prize in International Justice and Human Rights.


Recent weeks of violence between Israelis and Palestinians have left dead a total of nearly 40 people from both sides. A former Connecticut resident is among those critically injured.

Todd Lapin / Creative Commons

Inmates from Connecticut are among those expected to be released from federal prisons at the end of October, part of the largest one-time release of federal prisoners in the nation's history. 

Sarah Craig/Faces of Fracking / Creative Commons

Coventry has become the second town in Connecticut to pass an ordinance banning fracking waste from natural gas or oil drilling and extraction. The town of Washington passed a ban earlier this year.

West Midlands Police Department / Creative Commons

Governor Dannel Malloy has signed legislation that makes a number of changes to law enforcement practices in the state.

Robert Benson Photography

A new play premieres this weekend as part of a gala event celebrating the hundredth anniversary of a synagogue in Chester, Connecticut called Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek.

The play is called “100 Years in 36 Minutes.” Its co-writer, Lary Bloom, came to the WNPR studios earlier this week to talk about it.

Games for Change / Creative Commons

Nicholas Kristof, columnist for The New York Times, and Sheryl WuDunn were the first married couple to win a Pulitzer Prize for journalism. Their latest book, A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity looks at people with great ideas who are making the world a better place and calls upon all of us to do our part.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Secretary of the State Denise Merrill said her office has no legal authority to grant exceptions to state law on petitioning minor party candidates. Her statement comes in response to efforts by the Job Creation Party Committee in Bridgeport to get a petitioning mayoral candidate, incumbent Mayor Bill Finch, onto the ballot for the upcoming November election.

John Walker / Creative Commons

Under current law, by the time students in this year’s sixth grade class reach 12th grade, there will be new, more rigorous requirements to graduate high school.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Sculpture gardens bring together art, human creativity, and nature. There are several in Connecticut, including a private one nestled in a residential neighborhood in North Haven that winds in and around the home of artist David Millen.

Allen Phillips / Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

This weekend marks the grand re-opening of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Voters headed to the polls for municipal primaries on Wednesday in 23 cities and towns in Connecticut. Some cities experienced problems with absentee balloting and minor issues with voting machines.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Voters in Bridgeport, Connecticut go to the polls Wednesday in what’s seen as an improbable, but competitive Democratic primary. A former mayor, who spent seven years in federal prison for corruption while in office, has a shot at winning against a two-term incumbent. 

gigi_nyc / Creative Commons

A dedication ceremony and unveiling on Friday morning marked the 9/11 anniversary. It took place at the “Arch of 9/11 Remembrance” at the Bartlett Arboretum and Gardens in Stamford. 

The archway is made up of 14 offspring trees cultivated from the seeds of the World Trade Center’s “Survivor Tree.” The trees are trained over an arch made of metal and bamboo. 

Trinity College / YouTube.com

The president of Trinity College has decided to eliminate a mandate to make all fraternities co-ed.

Emilie Foyer / Creative Commons

One of the top economic issues for voters is the vast economic inquality in the country, according to Gallup polling.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A transformation is underway in southeastern Connecticut. New London Public Schools are transitioning to become the state’s only all-magnet school district. The idea is not only to serve city students better, but also to create schools that attract suburban students and families back to New London.


Democratic candidates vying to lead the city of Bridgeport met for their first debate this week.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Despite an uptick in shootings in Bridgeport, Mayor Bill Finch is defending his city's public safety record.